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https://stackoverflow.com/posts/42958663/revisions

Revision 4 was a rollback of all revisions with no explanation. I don't think it was constructive.

The other revisions (admittedly, one was mine) improved readability, or corrected syntax.

So my question is, does a petition process exist, and if so, what is that process?

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    Your changes introduced code formatting on words/phrases which were not code (e.g., threshold value). You also added code to a question, where there wasn't code before. Don't do either of those, and don't complain when someone rolls back those changes. Mar 22 '17 at 21:31
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    Why isn't nobody voting to close the question as unclear? Mohammad tries to clarify the meaning of the question, his edits are rolled back, yet nobody vote to close!? Catch 22 anyone?
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 18:53
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    @Braiam Well, whether or not the question is unclear is a different matter entirely, and also isn't related to the general question of "Is it possible to challenge a revision?" Handle the edits appropriately, VTC when appropriate, these are separate parts of your review strategy.
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:01
  • @JasonC I try to avoid answering XY question focusing on the Y aspect. You and Servy focused on the "X" aspect, the reason for the rollback. If you don't agree with the edit, leaving an unclear question is the worst possible result.
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:04
  • @Mohammad You may wish to edit your post here and make it more generic, removing your specific example, which is becoming a distraction.
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:08
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    Voted to reopen as this question is not asking whether a specific revision is appropriate or not. It's asking how to challenge a revision. The specific details of the linked example are not relevant to this post. See also the comment discussion under Servy's answer (if it has not been removed) for more justification of this reopen vote. Note that as per the title and question statement in this post, "does a petition process exist, and if so, what is that process?" is what is being asked, and is not addressed in the links.
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:32
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    @MikeMcCaughan Mohammad did not introduce code
    – Rob Mod
    Mar 23 '17 at 23:04
  • @Rob Although it was assumptions about input/output, not code, my understanding of the review queue is that such information is treated the same way. That is, you can't insert any that did not come directly from the OP. You can't even run their code and put the results in the question; they will reject it.
    – BSMP
    Mar 24 '17 at 3:21
  • @BSMP In my experience, a proper edit comment can go a long way in that regards. For example "The OP's code requires a development platform that is hard to set up and we're having some issues picturing the output (see comments). I've added the output of their program for others to see." Not a great example (had to come up with one off the top of my head) but, one important thing is to make sure that you give reviewers enough information to make a judgment if you're doing something that a reasonable default, context-less judgment would deem inappropriate.
    – Jason C
    Mar 24 '17 at 23:27
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As your revision note states, you were editing the question with assumptions that you made about what you think the question is actually asking.

Don't do that.

You shouldn't be editing a question to put in your own assumptions about what you think it's asking. If you think the question is unclear, post comments to the OP to ask them what they're actually asking, and if the ambiguities in the question are significant, than vote to close as "unclear".

Edits are there to improve the presentation of the author's own ideas, not to change what their actual underlying content is.

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  • "As your revision note states, you were editing the question with assumptions that you made about what you think the question is actually asking." That's not reason for roll backs. Do not spread unfounded dogma. If he clarified the question instead, that's a good thing!
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 18:51
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    @Braiam That's absolutely a reason to roll back a revision. Do not spread unfounded dogma. Clarifying a question by guessing what you think it means and editing the question accordingly isn't appropriate. If you want to clarify the question you assist the OP in providing enough information to make the question clear, rather than inventing details yourself. Had the user clarified the question by presenting information the author already provided more clearly, moved info the OP posted in comments into the question, etc. then that would be "a good thing".
    – Servy
    Mar 23 '17 at 18:55
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    @Braiam Making major assumptions in an edit is definitely a reason to roll back the edit rather than closing the question.
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 18:57
  • @JasonC no, is not. "Editing is a form of communication", whatever you believe, editing to clarify the meaning of the post it's explicitly encouraged. Read Shog. You need it.
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:00
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    @Braiam I'll call that bluff. Let's see a quote form Shog saying that it's appropriate to edit your own assumptions about what you think a question is asking into the question.
    – Servy
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:04
  • meta.stackoverflow.com/a/288836/792066 I even quoted Shog words... this is so sad. How about using google search. Lead by the example will ya?
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:05
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    @Braiam So the full point there is "editing to clarify the meaning of the post without changing its meaning" (see also). And whether or not the OP was justified in their specific edit (and they were, in fact, as the author of the post they edited ultimately ended up applying their changes) is entirely unrelated to the general question of "How do I challenge a revision?" being asked here. The major mistake the OP here made was giving you a distraction by linking to their specific revision as an example.
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:06
  • @JasonC how can you not change the meaning if the meaning is unclear? You can't claim it change the meaning if you don't understand the question.
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:06
  • @Braiam More importantly, why do you believe that this question is about whether or not the specific linked example was appropriate or the specific linked question should be closed? The question is not "Was this edit appropriate?" or "Why was my edit rolled back?". The actual question is clearly stated: "Is it possible to challenge a revision? ... does a petition process exist, and if so, what is that process?"
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:09
  • @JasonC defending a decision (the rollback) with a blanket statement which goes against the core principle of SE (that no question should be edited, even if it clarifies it, when the help center states "Any time you feel you can make the post better, and are inclined to do so. Editing is encouraged!" and "If you see something that needs improvement, click edit!") I would obviously rebuff and rebuke such claims. At least what I claim is aligned with the help center and several posts made by CM's.
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:13
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    @Braiam Those statements aren't the entirety of the guidelines on how to edit. The fact that people are encouraged to edit posts that need improvement doesn't mean that every type of edit is acceptable. There are more rules than just that on what types of edits are and aren't appropriate.
    – Servy
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:18
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    @Braiam Uh... the title of this question is "Is it possible to challenge a revision?" The closing sentence of the question is "So my question is, does a petition process exist, and if so, what is that process?". My answer specifically has the section "In general, if you want to "challenge" a revision...". And all of Servy's points are valid, and focused on edits in general. I can only assume that you are experiencing a different reality than the rest of us, and I am not sure what else to say (and also not sure why you are becoming agitated about this).
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:23
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    @Braiam Yes, and that page that you reference has lots of information about when it is and isn't appropriate to edit posts. That it opens by saying that posts can be edited and then qualifies that statement by describing when it is and isn't appropriate to edit posts doesn't mean that all types of edits are magically okay, just because it opens with the phrase "Any time you see a post that needs improvement and are inclined to suggest an edit, you are welcome to do so." If that phrase were the entirety of the editing guidelines, then that would be different.
    – Servy
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:23
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    @Braiam The OP applied certain aspects of the change and not others, for starters, also that the OP did it is relevant.
    – Servy
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:25
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    @Braiam The whole rest of the page that you referenced. I can't quote the whole page, nor do I see any reason to do so. You challenged the existence of any editing guidelines beyond that one sentence. You clearly know where to find them; me repeating them here is pointless. Here are some quote marks if they make you feel better, "".
    – Servy
    Mar 23 '17 at 19:29
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There is no specific site mechanic to challenge revisions. In general, if you want to "challenge" a revision, some possibilities (among many):

  • You can ping the editor in a comment and ask them about it, or
  • You can accept that the revision occurred and just mention your point or ask for clarification in a comment to the OP, or
  • If the revision is vandalism, offensive, etc. you can raise a custom flag on the post and point out the issue (but this should only be used in clear cases where moderator involvement should be required, not when you simply disagree with the edit), or
  • You could come ask about it on meta if it's appropriate and you are able to make a clear case and are prepared to accept disagreement, or
  • You could let it go and move on.

The one thing you shouldn't do is start an argument in the comment section, or start a "rollback war". When in doubt, politely ask for clarification in a comment, or, in the case where you made an edit and it was rolled back, find another way to state the point you were trying to make with your edit.


As an aside, for your specific case: Your revision was rolled back by somebody who believed that to be the right decision: They believed you had made some rather trivial edits to the text and also, the major issue, is that it appeared you added code that wasn't there before. Even in cases where you do feel this is justified (and yes, parts of your edit seem to have been justified in this case, as the OP went and reapplied portions of your edit) it is generally better to point it out in a comment if unsure, or in the situation where the OP made a clarification in a comment that you're incorporating into the question, you'd be expected to cite the comment or whatever in your edit description so that it is immediately clear to reviewers who may otherwise roll back. You might want to check out the edit guidelines in the help center, they clear up what is and isn't expected of you in an edit.

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  • If you don't agree that the edit clarified the question, vote to close as unclear!
    – Braiam
    Mar 23 '17 at 18:52
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    @Braiam I am not sure I agree with that in general. Inappropriate edits warrant a rollback/flag/etc., not a closure (for example, our response to vandalism edits should not be to say "welp, that's how that post looks now" and vtc...). Also as I interpret the OP, the question is about "how to challenge a revision", but not anything beyond that.
    – Jason C
    Mar 23 '17 at 18:55

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