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This question already has an answer here:

This question is inspired after a long discussion, where no consensus was achieved but nicely summarized by eis in this chat message

According to Wikipedia, "The idea [of plagiarism] remains problematic with unclear definitions and unclear rules.", and they give several definitions of which some include intent to benefit from such act and some say it needs to be deliberate. I think it's fair to say that there are different definitions of it, some mention intent explicitly, some don't.

Currently on SE plagiarized answer are handled with custom mod flag, if the flag is correct the user will receive a warning (comment or maybe mod message), possibly deletion or suspension.

The discussion in this meta is what is the threshold to consider an answer plagiarized, in help center

Plagiarism - posting the work of others with no indication that it is not your own

Help center continues with how to provide correct attribution (provide a link to the original page or answer, provide the name of the original author)

Fairly often however on Stack Overflow we see answer from new user that pass "non" answer like

Copied large block of code or entire post from other answer

Thanks UserName, that worked great!!!

or

Example

My "instinct" on these answer has been to flag as NAA (Not An Answer), passing comment as you can see in screen shot, however the attribution part is not correct since it has copied text from this answer on same post.

This brings up some considerations.

  • Is intent to benefit from plagiarism needed?

or

  • "No indication that it is not your own", are we more tolerant to new users, hence we don't expect them to know how to provide correct attribution, format ecc and we should look at context, when needed we help them to edit and in this case just flag it NAA?

or

  • The correct way is to always indicated that they are not providing correct attribution and custom mod flag all answers that do not provide correct attribution as plagiarism, in this case skipping the LQP queue.

Please note: I am excluding the case where it can be difficult to see the thanks, please help part, hence it is more helpful to in any case raise a custom mod flag to avoid review queue and help moderator to evaluate it correctly.

marked as duplicate by Yvette Colomb, Stephen Rauch, Michael Gaskill, Glorfindel discussion Mar 11 '17 at 8:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I find this definition of plagiarism to be well thought out. – Heretic Monkey Mar 9 '17 at 22:07
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    Note that none of the several definitions of plagiarism provided on Wikipedia rely in any way on intent, contrary to the false claim you have quoted in your comment. While the definitions do vary slightly in their specifics and subtleties, none of them rely on the intent of the perpetrator. – Servy Mar 9 '17 at 22:12
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    Change "with no indication that it is not your own" so that it is consistent with the rest of the help centre article (something like "unless you do exactly what we say, as set out below"). Punishment is a must. There's also the question of code. There needs to be a get-out for quoting code from the question, and indeed the questioner quoting code back at you. Plus are all the "as John says in his answer" references good enough like that if they relate to the same question, or the full kablooey from the updated help centre. With examples, or advice on how many lines can be copied? – Bill Woodger Mar 9 '17 at 22:18
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    The term is getting abused badly at SO because the voting dialogs limits speech. Reviewers in particular like to say "This isn't good enough, go back and do a better job". They can't. Endless debates about what a vote reason might mean is the result. The case where a user approved of an 8 word edit and got banned from reviewing was particularly egregious. It just isn't defensible. Review sucks, nothing generated more complaints and ill will than review and SO users get fed up with it. Best scenario is that it just fails completely with review queues filling up to capacity. – Hans Passant Mar 9 '17 at 22:59
  • @Glorfindel, the duplicate question is about if you can use another answer (how to reference) this is about when to mod flag, hence how we define plagiarism, in particolar if to use NAA flag or custom mode flag. I personally can not see how and answer on the other questions answers this question. As you can see the answer are different, we are speaking about intent, new user, how to evaluate when its plagiarism. – Petter Friberg Mar 11 '17 at 19:46
  • @Servy how does "to benefit in a setting where originality is expected" (part of one of the definitions from wikipedia) not include "intent to benefit from such act" (my claim)? Which part of my claim you think was false? – eis Mar 14 '17 at 7:51
  • @eis Because you invented the word "intent" out of thin air. One definition has it, the other doesn't, so your definition isn't included in the other. You can unintentionally benefit from something. You falsely claimed that the other definition required intent. It didn't. It just required a "benefit". (A statement that the majority of definitions, including SE's doesn't contain, by the way.) – Servy Mar 14 '17 at 13:17
  • @Servy ... are you claiming you can do something "to benefit" from it without benefit being your intent? Of course, you can unintentionally benefit from something, but that's totally beside the point. You can't do something "to benefit from it" without having intent to benefit from it. – eis Mar 14 '17 at 14:27
  • @eis So you're arguing that they need to intend to have benefited from the post. That doesn't mean they need to have intended to plagiarize the content. Not only is that not a part of most definitions, including SE's definition, that doesn't mean that they need to have intended to plagiarize the content. If they unintentionally plagiarized the content, so long as they wanted to benefit from the content they provided, it would meet that definition, so it still doesn't mean what you're claiming it means. – Servy Mar 14 '17 at 15:02
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    @Servy I'm just arguing that some definitions of plagiarism do contain intent, and I'm arguing against your claim "none of the several definitions of plagiarism provided on Wikipedia rely in any way on intent", which you also seem to now acknowledge as being a false statement. – eis Mar 14 '17 at 18:08
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Is intent to benefit from plagiarism needed?

No. Plagiarism is providing someone else's original content as if it were your own. You can do this intentionally and you can do it unintentionally. Whether or not you intended to post someone else's content without properly citing it doesn't change whether or not you did. It may affect the consequences; deliberate plagiarism may well have a more severe consequence than someone who intended to indicate that the content wasn't theirs but failed to. Not all types of plagiarism are created equal, but it is plagiarism.

are we more tolerant to new users, hence we don't expect them to know how to provide correct attribution, format ecc

We expect even new users to not plagiarise content here.

Like with the above case, a moderator may choose to take this into consideration when determining the consequences, but it's not okay to plagiarize just because you're new.

The correct way to always indicated that they are not providing correct attribution and custom mod flag all answers that do not provide correct attribution as plagiarism

If you see an answer that is plagiarizing content, yes, flag it and indicate as much.

in this case skipping the LQP queue.

You aren't prohibited from flagging a post for any other reasons that it may merit flagging for. If a post merits flagging for entirely separate reasons as well, by all means, flag it for those reasons as well. You aren't prohibited from using any other types of flags just because a post also plagiarizes content.

  • I see. We differ on the benefit. I see any claim of it being yours not someone else's as "benefit". It doesn't have to be directly tangible (like points or badges here, or money), just that you've claimed it is yours (by not disclaiming it as yours). For me, a plagiarist, uncaught, always benefits. – Bill Woodger Mar 9 '17 at 22:21
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    @BillWoodger If you define using someone's work without attributing it as a benefit to that person, then there's no reason to add a statement that the person must benefit to the definition of plagiarism. In your case it's a consequence of the definition, not a part of it. – Servy Mar 9 '17 at 22:23
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    Yes. I've not suggested adding anything about benefit, however. For me, the benefit is inherent (implicit) with plagiarism, and the intent is there, explicit, with not plagiarism. If we can get the help centre sorted out, then I certainly have no problem with how SO organises its own things. He who pays the piper. But, if the help centre continues to be unclear, then I will absolutely go with that first line from the help centre. Not the detail. Fix that, and we're done. – Bill Woodger Mar 9 '17 at 22:28
  • @Servy I'm not sure if it makes a difference to what either of you is arguing, but there's a subtle distinction between using somebody's work without attributing it to the source (your wording) and using it in a way that gives the impression that you've claimed it is yours (Bill's wording). It's perfectly possible to fail to attribute content without implying that you are its creator (e.g. an unattributed traffic accident compilation on YouTube - a reasonable viewer will infer that they weren't all created by the uploader unless they're a very unlucky person). – Mark Amery Mar 9 '17 at 22:30
  • @MarkAmery And there's me thinking that Servy and I were finally agreeing. – Bill Woodger Mar 9 '17 at 22:31
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    @MarkAmery If you're posting something in an answer on the site, it's going to be assumed to be yours unless you specifically indicate otherwise. The site's terms even say as much, saying that you must be the original author of user submitted contributions, and be able to apply the CC-WIki licence to it in order to publish it to the site. Contexts outside of SO can sometimes be murkier, but fortunately we don't need to deal with that here. – Servy Mar 9 '17 at 22:35
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    @Servy Ohh, goody. I read your last sentence incorrectly. The benefit in the definition doesn't have to be a tangible benefit. You could certainly leave out the benefit, and just go with "claim that something is yours which is not". I've no problem with that. Does the inclusion of benefit add anything? I don't think so, it's one less thing to put up in "defence" (there is none) of plagiarism. – Bill Woodger Mar 9 '17 at 22:36
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    @Mark Amery: Video compilations on YouTube are comparable to answers that are lists of links on SO. And besides, that still doesn't make it okay to reupload content that is not your own without expressly written permission. But even that notwithstanding, YouTube is a video sharing site and SO is Q&A - unlike with video reuploads, generally people will assume your answer is your own original work. The only thing closest to an indication that it's not your own work is if it's painfully obvious that you didn't write it. – BoltClock Mar 10 '17 at 4:27
  • @Mark Amery: Have you ever met a person whose only means of verbal communication were sentences copied from others? I fondly recall one particular user who not only plagiarized an answer, but also replied to all the asker's comments with sentences plagiarized from answers and even other comments. I don't know how they do it. Apparently they can't construct a sentence in English independently, but they know exactly which sentences of others to use in context? The human brain astounds me sometimes. – BoltClock Mar 10 '17 at 4:45
  • @BoltClock - That was actually Tay, Microsoft's Stack Overflow bot. All it could draw on was existing content. Tay aside, this answer is spot on. – Travis J Mar 10 '17 at 7:16
  • @BoltClock No, but then again, I haven't yet been granted my wish to become besties with Bumblebee. – Nic Hartley Mar 11 '17 at 6:52
6

Is intent to benefit from plagiarism needed?

Intent to "benefit" probably isn't a useful standard to apply at all, since the main personal "benefit" from posting on Stack Overflow is imaginary internet points and even the guiltiest of plagiarists here can plausibly argue that they didn't benefit in any way.

Intent to not attribute the content to its original source, however, is important. Frequently I see people posts that contain a link to a source followed by a copy-and-paste of relevant content from the source with no quote marks or quote formatting. That's not good enough - we should insist that it's clear what content is being quoted and what content is original - but it's still probably a good-faith attempt at attribution, and should be remedied by editing to fix the formatting and giving some gentle advice to the poster (either in the edit summary or as a comment).

On the other hand, when content has been copied and pasted without any indication whatsoever that it isn't written by the poster, I recommend always flagging for moderator attention. Those cases are either people who understand that what they're doing is considered wrong here but are shamelessly violating our rules and norms, or people who simply don't have a clue that most of the world considers plagiarism to be wrong, perhaps due to coming from a culture where plagiarism is widely accepted. Either way, they need somebody with authority to tell them to knock it off, and that means a moderator.

are we more tolerant to new users, hence we don't expect them to know how to provide correct attribution, format ecc

Whether a user is new to Stack Overflow is irrelevant. Even a user with thousands of rep and a long history of plagiarised posts may never yet have been challenged over them; you can't reliably assume that they know better than a user with a 1 next to their name. Treat the cases equivalently.

Fairly often however on Stack Overflow we see answer from new user that pass "non" answer like

Copied large block of code or entire post from other answer

Thanks UserName, that worked great!!!

I wouldn't flag this with a custom mod flag. The only real issue is the attempt to use an answer to reply to another answer. The original source is visible on the same page, there's clearly no intent to conceal the source (since the answerer is actually trying to address the original author of the quoted content) and any possible confusion about authorship will be moot after a NAA deletion. Just flag as NAA and move on.

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    The same culture where plagiarism is widely accepted is the same culture where Stack Overflow reputation is viewed as more than just imaginary internet points. It gets people jobs. – BoltClock Mar 10 '17 at 4:35
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    "a user with thousands of rep and a long history of plagiarised posts may never yet have been challenged over them" And once they are, hoo boy is it a pain to clean up. Don't just take my word for it; ask any of the other mods, or even Shog9. – BoltClock Mar 10 '17 at 4:40
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    +1 for the last paragraph. Posts like this might be (unintended) plagiarism, but they are also NAA. So they will be deleted in the LQPRQ anyway. I don't think, letting a mod nuke posts would be useful. It would be a waste of time (for both the mod and the one who flags). – FelixSFD Mar 10 '17 at 7:40
  • Can you explain how quoting an answer in it's entirety - even with proper attribution - doesn't generally imply that the question is a duplicate? While possibly not an exact duplicate, by SO standards of trying to keep good clean questions, a duplicate nonetheless? – dfd Mar 10 '17 at 19:03
  • @dfd: It does, generally. But take note that, like any other answerer, a plagiarist can also misunderstand a question and copy an answer from what they think is a duplicate question when in reality it's not even remotely relevant. If the copied answer does address both questions sufficiently, which it usually does, then yes the question is probably a duplicate. – BoltClock Mar 11 '17 at 2:58
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    @dfd From your comment, I think you may be misunderstanding the scenario being described in the "Copied large block of code or entire post from other answer" example in the question (and in my answer here) - it's talking about people quoting an answer in its entirety and posting it in an answer to the same question. (Yes, this happens reasonably frequently, I'm afraid.) – Mark Amery Mar 11 '17 at 11:29

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