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I submitted this edit yesterday, which was rejected because

This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer.

I tried submitting it again today with a clearer description and no lines added, but the proposed edit currently has two Reject votes with the same reason given.

All I've done is remove the unimportant parts -- the lines of code that did not change between the question and the answer -- so why are the reviewers interpreting the edit as a response?

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    It doesn't matter if it's irrelevant, you're rewriting the answer. Such substantial changes to answers are almost always going to get rejected. The answerer decided to write it that way. If you don't like how they presented it, that could be a reason to vote one way or another, but it is not a reason to change their presentation style. – Kendra Mar 3 '17 at 22:58
  • You have to think that the people who are reviewing may not have an understanding of the answer/code/language and so as a rule they would reject such changes. I would stick to formatting, reducing noise, grammar and the likes but don't go removing parts of code. – Bugs Mar 3 '17 at 23:12
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You're basically saying the answer has too much irrelevant information... Which you could just say to the answerer in a comment rather than making such a drastic change to their answer.

You're rewriting their answer, with how much you're changing. That's generally a big no-no. While you may argue about the exact rejection reason used, I honestly agree with this edit having been rejected both times.

  • But the information I removed is irrelevant, and the answer is less readable because of it. – wjandrea Mar 3 '17 at 22:58
  • Au contraire, if the answer has too many irrelevant details that might muddle the main point of the answer, trimming it out should be done and editors are encouraged to do so. – Braiam Mar 4 '17 at 2:41
  • Also, the heck that answer is a total complete mess! It uses the most convulsed way to make everything play along. The OP would have figured out if they used an MCVE from the start... the whole thing is brittle and riddled with problems (the tmp file creation, just to mention one). BTW wjandrea is the correct one. – Braiam Mar 4 '17 at 2:45
  • Putting the solution in context is one thing, but copy-pasting the whole script is unnecessary. – wjandrea Mar 4 '17 at 3:38
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    @wjandrea provide your own answer instead of rewriting existing one. If you feel that an answer is not useful because it is hard to find actual answer in it - consider downvote or comment (avoid doing both at the same time for reasons). – Alexei Levenkov Mar 4 '17 at 3:51
  • @AlexeiLevenkov How to Edit pointers say "clarify meaning without changing it" which is exactly what I did. Brevity is part of clarity. – wjandrea Mar 4 '17 at 4:13
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    @wjandrea major code rewrites can't be reviewed without experts in the particular area. Currently SO have no solution how to make it happen (reviews are done by regular users who may not have experience with particular technology). If you have proposal how to successfully review such major code changes - feel free to make separate proposal on this site, make sure to read through existing posts first - meta.stackoverflow.com/search?q=reject+code+change – Alexei Levenkov Mar 4 '17 at 4:28

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