44

The Visual Studio 2015 Community Edition is essentially the same as the Visual Studio 2015 Professional Edition. As it stands, the only real reason to use this tag is for license clarification. Which is off topic anyway.

As such, it's probably better to put this as a synonym of the broader visual-studio-2015 tag.

At the same time this tag has previously been proposed to be a synonym of the no longer existing visual-studio-2015-ce, because of which this can't be corrected without moderator intervention.

The differences are outlined on the feature comparison. But these differences are again License only. E.g. the Team Foundation Server issues are part of the Community Edition, but the license doesn't allow the usage unless a CAL is purchased seperately. If you connect to a TFS server and have a Client Access License, you get all these features, they are part of the Community Edition, are installed by default, but not licensed with it. Apart from that, they're still equal.

Plus, there are no vs-pro, vs-enterprise, vs-ultimate, vs-test-pro tags. And we can do without them just fine it seems. And on top of that many of the individual features have their own tags, so [visual-studio] + [uml] works much better than [vs-pro] or [vs-ultimate].

There is already a , so + has the same effect as a combined tag. With 10 versions of VS in tags, having all types as additional tags is not something that's desirable I'd say. (coincidentally, the version less tag has the same issue, two variations exist: and

The [vs-*] tag would be in line with and leaves space for other longer tag configurations. Plus, kind of feels like a community and not necessarily a specific edition of .

Would adding this information to the VS20* tag usage sections make sense?

Proposal:

  • 2
    If the only difference is license issues, then the separate tags are not needed and should be burninated. – Lundin Mar 3 '17 at 12:04
  • There are extensions that will install in Community but not in Pro, or vice versa, and questions about this might be topical. But I don't think that's enough to warrant a separate tag. – user743382 Mar 4 '17 at 21:24
  • Right, and the same is true for pro vs ultimate. And those have never had a separate tag. Plus lots of Qs regarding vs in general are tagged community edition. – jessehouwing Mar 5 '17 at 8:52
  • 1
    I've just done the first 2. I'll give some time for some meta-discussion to take place before doing the 3rd as well. – Matt Mar 5 '17 at 10:27
  • @Matt Thanks! We'll get this whole visual studio tag soup cleaned up at some point :) – jessehouwing Mar 5 '17 at 10:29
  • @Matt looks like there was no discussion. Should we proceed? – Vadim Kotov Aug 4 '17 at 12:23
-1

Possible Solution:
as it has only small impacts on features, it would be ok to merge the tags, and questions regarding the special features may add the tag of that feature, this also increases readability.

TL;DR It does have no impact on how code is compiled, but some features of the IDE are only available for the Professional or the Enterprise-Edition

I have to state that there are (minor) differences between the community edition and the licensed edition, They may have no big effect on the usage of the different tags, but it is different

Here you can find a list with all the differences between the versions:

https://www.visualstudio.com/vs/compare/

there you can for example see that the Professional and Enterprise edition have several Team Foundation Server features while the community has none of them

  • 2
    But do those differences effect how the code compiles in the different versions? AFAIK no. – NathanOliver Mar 3 '17 at 13:12
  • 1
    You need to think about the questions that are being asked with this tag. There are mayor swathes of shared functionality. That one is missing "UML® 2.0 Compliant Diagrams" most likely wouldn't change the average question that this tag gets with. – Braiam Mar 3 '17 at 13:16
  • As stated in the answer, it does not have a big effect, so no effect on the compiling but it does have an effect on for example the possibility of testing web applications – Florian K Mar 3 '17 at 13:17
  • 1
    +1; SO is for both compiling and tools for programmers. The tool is different in ways separate from compiling. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Mar 3 '17 at 14:50
  • The Team Foundation Server issues are again license only. If you connect to a TFS server and have a Client Access License, you get all these features, they are part of the Community Edition, are installed by default, but not licensed with it. Apart from that, they're still equal. Plus, there are no vs-pro, vs-enterprise, vs-ultimate vs-test-pro tags. And on top of that many of the individual features have their own tags, so [visual-studio] + [uml] works much better than [vs-pro] or [vs-ultimate]. – jessehouwing Mar 3 '17 at 14:54
  • @jessehouwing yes you are probably right with that, it is also better for readability – Florian K Mar 3 '17 at 15:23
  • Updated the Original Post to reflect this additional data. – jessehouwing Mar 3 '17 at 15:27
  • Updated the Answer with a possible solution, which you have provided, and because of thats partly your idea, I transformed it into a community wiki – Florian K Mar 3 '17 at 15:33

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .