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In review queue, I felt many things were wrong about a specific tag wiki edit, including asking for abuse:

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/15286625

To my surprise, the edit description was approved. So I felt to be in a situation I had described some time ago. I tried to figure out why it was approved. The three people to approve it have high stats: 91% approval rate on suggestions (rkosegi and VividD) and 82% approval rate on suggestions (Sun Qingyao). So I thought I may be facing a situation of over-approval. I decided to submit a correction on the edit, with explanation on the three matters that were corrected (and the system forced me to add an excerpt in order to fix the description, even if I had no idea on what excerpt to add):

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/15336760 https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/15336761

And to my second surprise, three hours later, I'm unanimously rejected by 2 rejections so far [edit: votes seem reversed now, could be the meta effect]. So I must have been doing something wrong twice, despite that I really dislike to see a sentence asking for abuse on a ballerina: it sounds like a sexist joke.

I'm aware that tag descriptions do not follow the same rules as questions and answers, but I'm now concern to know how to write a correct description for a tag? (and how to vote for approval/rejection on those)

  • Is typo irrelevant?
  • Is making jokes fine?
  • Can it be minimalist without even a context ("[tag] is open-source")?
  • Is providing a link to official website the only required information?
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    "unanimously rejected" Check again. For the record, it's not a sexist joke, it's saying that they want people to use the language too much, to the point that it becomes abuse. It deserves to be removed -- that is, the whole tag wiki, since it doesn't describe anything -- but it's not sexist, just bad. – Nic Hartley Feb 25 '17 at 16:52
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    To be clear, the tag wiki wasn't asking for users to abuse the tag, but to abuse the software. That's a term frequently used among new programs to indicate users should do anything and everything in the program so the developer can weed out all the bugs and perfect it. That text still isn't appropriate for a tag wiki, but just pointing that out. – animuson Feb 25 '17 at 17:30
  • @animuson in order to fix the description, I was forced to provide an excerpt of this description... which I did by copy-pasting the whole description... and it now counts as a rejection for being too short. I'm afraid I'll continue to skip all the tag-edits related suggestions, as the outcomes are unpredictable. – Cœur Feb 26 '17 at 2:09
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    @animuson: Please, some review bans for those who voted 'Accept' on the suggestion linked in the question and in my answer (I'd already reported one via flag, because my reviews overlapped with multiple of his, all on tag wiki edits, and he approved plagiarism every time -- but the other reviewers ought to be examined as well). – Ben Voigt Feb 26 '17 at 18:40
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    @animuson: Also, can stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/15347034 be turned into an audit? It was apparently my 21st review today so my rejection vote didn't get recorded by the system... but it's a beautiful example of a code-breaking edit (whitespace does matter inside #include, for those who aren't aware) that is likely to be accepted by reviewers not paying attention (here, the only reviewer was the OP, a brand new user to the site, who clearly didn't know that it's permissible for a total newbie to reject a bad suggestion) – Ben Voigt Feb 26 '17 at 18:48
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    The owners of the object of the tag say "Ballerina is an open-source project. We want you to use it, abuse it and show us how to improve it". It is quite clear that, when asking for it to be abused, they are soliciting testing and bug reports. Why deny them that? – Mawg Feb 27 '17 at 9:44
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    @Mawg: They are welcome to tell their users that. You can even quote them saying that (with proper attribution). But you cannot pretend to have made that up yourself, and that quote does not a good tag wiki make (I've already quoted the explanation in my answer, which was posted long before your comment; I'm not going to explain it again in comments just because you couldn't be bothered to read the top-voted answer before weighing in) – Ben Voigt Feb 27 '17 at 23:29
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Hmm that sounded familiar. https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/15340127

And the tag wiki you identified also should have been rejected as plagiarism, because it's directly copied from https://gfoss.ellak.gr/2017/02/21/ballerina-a-new-programming-language/ (toward the bottom).

The rejection reason already explains why direct copies are bad:

Generic descriptions such as encyclopedia articles and ad copy do not provide useful guidance; try creating something useful to this community specifically, and be sure to attribute the original author.

In cases like this, don't try to submit an edit suggestion cleaning up the most objectionable sentence, as the wiki as a whole will still be plagiarism without attribution. Instead, find an answer made by one of the reviewers who voted badly, flag it with a custom "needs moderator attention flag", and explain what's wrong along with a link to the review page. A diamond mod will then nuke the whole bad wiki from orbit and issue review bans to the robo-reviewers.

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The main issues with the proposed tag were the lack of tag usage guidance and plagiarism. It should have been rejected for these reasons alone. There needs to be some content unique to Stack Overflow, even if it is just a brief description.

Similarly, your edit was rejected for the lack of tag usage guidance... and well, complete lack of any meaningful content really.

So I thought I may be facing a situation of over-approval.

You were, for the above mentioned reasons. The edit should have been rejected.

I decided to submit a correction on the edit, with explanation on the three matters that were corrected (and the system forced me to add an excerpt in order to fix the description, even if I had no idea on what excerpt to add)

That's not a good idea. Unless you have knowledge of the topic, you shouldn't touch tag wikis. Similarly, if you don't know what's required of a tag wiki, you shouldn't touch them or review edits of them.

Regarding the choice of language for writing this particular wiki, it was informal and therefore not very appropriate, since a tag wiki is a reference text. Jokes or other forms of informal language are not fine, nor are subjective opinions etc. One should keep a neutral tone, like when writing a scientific article.

So for example, the text "we" seems to refer to the contributors of the open source project, but they don't own the SO tag. There's no groups here, only the one community. It is not ok to use tag wikis as some form of advertising for external resources.

As for sexist jokes, that seems to be your personal (mis)interpretation of it. Rather far-fetched and not really the point why all of this should have been rejected.


Is typo irrelevant?

Typos should be fixed.

Is making jokes fine?

No.

Can it be minimalist without even a context ("[tag] is open-source")?

No.

Is providing a link to official website the only required information?

No.


Overall, nobody should be messing with tag wikis unless they have technical knowledge of the topic and understand the rules for writing wikis, which you can read about here.

The same applies to reviewers of tag wikis. If you aren't certain, always click 'skip'.

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    This sounds like edits or reviews on a tag should be limited to people with at least 1 point in the tag. – Cœur Feb 27 '17 at 14:34
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    @Cœur Indeed. I believe several people have proposed just that. – Lundin Feb 27 '17 at 18:10

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