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I think about this often during development..

I've implemented something in a particular framework or language which I believe is a good solution based on my current knowledge. But I want to show others what I've done and ask if there is a better solution, or maybe they could highlight flaws (maybe it's an anti-pattern without me even realising for example).

Where is the best place to ask these sort of questions?

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    Code Review. Might be what you're looking for, but I encourage you to get acquainted with their help center and check out their faq on meta before posting your question. – user4639281 Feb 12 '17 at 1:48
  • I was not aware of Code Review, thanks @TinyGiant. But I guess the downside of NOT asking on StackOverflow is that if you're implementing something on a particular framework, then a question might not get opinions from other developers that are using the same framework. – Eurig Jones Feb 12 '17 at 1:55
  • That's a concern on stack overflow as well. Questions like the one you're suggesting usually end up being closed as too broad or primarily opinion based. It is possible to ask such questions and be on topic, but it is not easy. You need to make sure that what you're looking for is objective and based on facts, and that it is narrowly scoped but also useful to future viewers. You need to ask about a specific thing and make your example as short as possible while still being reproducible and readable. – user4639281 Feb 12 '17 at 1:59
  • I guess stack overflow is great in terms of asking specific technical questions for specific platforms/languages/frameworks... But for other questions that require more opinion/critique related answers.. Yes there are other stack exchanges for that... But as they are more higher level, and they will be hard to target developers specific to that framework, language or platform. – Eurig Jones Feb 12 '17 at 2:16
  • I don't think it's any more difficult than here. They have a rich and diverse user base, and they get less questions than we do, so if there are developers using whatever thing you're asking about over there, they are more likely to find it than if you ask here. – user4639281 Feb 12 '17 at 2:27
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The perfect place to ask these types of questions is Code Review. It is designed to do exactly what you describe:

I want to show others what I've done and ask if there is a better solution, or maybe they could highlight flaws (maybe it's an anti-pattern without me even realising for example).

In order to ask a question there, you need to include a brief description of the problem that your code solves, and the complete, working code that comprises your solution. People will then respond with improvements that could be made to your code, bugs that may be found in your code, or recommendations for an entirely different strategy that you should consider instead. All aspects of the code are fair game, and different answers will likely point out different things.

These types of questions are not on topic, broadly speaking, for Stack Overflow. We don't review code here, either to highlight flaws or suggest a better solution. You could probably ask a similar question on Stack Overflow, but you would need to frame it differently. Instead of presenting your solution, you would present your programming problem, note your requirements/constraints, and ask for a solution to it.

But I guess the downside of NOT asking on StackOverflow is that if you're implementing something on a particular framework, then a question might not get opinions from other developers that are using the same framework.

This doesn't make much sense to me. Yeah, you might get useless, irrelevant answers from people who don't know anything about the technology you're using, but those are considered bad answers, and you should be downvoting them. Eventually, they are likely to be removed by others with moderation privileges. This is true on both Stack Overflow and on Code Review (and, indeed, on any Stack Exchange site).

People do pay attention to the tags you apply to your question, which is why it's important to get them right. If you want answers from people who know jQuery, use the tag, rather than the tag.

Now, it may be the case, especially on Code Review, that you get answers from someone who is an expert in the language, but not in the particular framework that you're using. That is generally not a problem, as those people still have useful insight into ways that you can improve your code. If you don't like that person's feedback, you can ignore it. More than one answer can, and often is, provided. Unless you're using something particularly obscure, there's no reason to think that there won't be people familiar with it on Code Review.

Although you aren't saying this, the only concern here is that Code Review and Stack Overflow have two different audiences. While there are some users who participate on both sites, the most active users on one site are generally not that active on the other site (there is a limited amount of time in the day, after all), so when asking a question that could be on-topic either place, you would have to choose depending on which audience you'd like to have. As one example, if you're trying to perform low-level optimization on a piece of C code, that would be on-topic on either site, but at the present time, you're virtually guaranteed to get better answers on Stack Overflow, so you'd probably want to ask such questions here. This isn't a relevant factor for you, though, because as you describe it, your question would not be on-topic for Stack Overflow, making Code Review your only option. Since you won't have enough rep there to offer a bounty, use Twitter or some other means to promote your question. Or just do it the old-fashioned way by writing a good, interesting question.

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