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I answered a question how could I reduce the cyclomatic complexity? The cited information does support my succinct answer where I basically question the OP saying cyclomatic complexity of 7 is too high and illustrate how the a number of sources say that 7 is not a high score and furthermore the explanations of what how the complexity level is arrived at could also be deemed helpful... the 6 upvotes seemingly being testament to the answers validity... from my little experience on SO I've learnt to not just answer the question, but to also to ascertain the validity of the question in the first place.

Here is the moderators explanation for deleting the post..

Copied wholesale from gmetrics.sourceforge.net/…. Please only cite sources to support your own words; remove the copied text and all we have left is a comment about one line in the question.

This is seemingly a very literal and almost flippant comment... I questioned the OP at the highest level, i.e. are you sure 7 is too high? Giving evidence to back up my assertion.

@Paul: Sorry, I ran out of space in my flag response (we're only allowed 200 characters). If you wish to get any more clarifications on this flag handling/ post, please ask a question on Meta. Flags were not designed (and therefore do not work well) for this type of back and forth. – Matt

P.S. While the Moderators explanation for deletion is somewhat logical, as far as I can see his logic does not follow posting guidelines for an answer being ok if it's helpful and it being ok to put text for references in the page (in case the external content gets moved/deleted)... of course I could always be wrong, hence this question post.

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I left a clarification on the post:

Copied wholesale from http://gmetrics.sourceforge.net/gmetrics-CyclomaticComplexityMetric.html. Please only cite sources to support your own words; remove the copied text and all we have left is a comment about one line in the question.

Also see our help center on reference material written by others:

Do not copy the complete text of external sources; instead, use their words and ideas to support your own.

Almost the entire post is a copy. The only words of your own are stating that you feel that a cyclomatic complexity of 7 is not too high:

7 too high ? that flies in the face of most documentation I've read on Cyclomatic Complexity. 1-10 is generally classed as low risk so for a 7 to be classed as too high?!?!?!? Strange to say the least

and the copied material is used to support that view. However, that doesn't actually answer the question stated (how could I reduce the cyclomatic complexity?); it is at best a comment that the question perhaps has no basis to be asked.

Even if it would be a valid answer, you could have quoted only relevant sections. For example, you could have just quoted the one sentence that supports your view:

The value of 10 is often considered as the threshold between acceptable (low risk) code and too complex (higher risk)

and leave it to the reader to visit the link to get the further context and evidence.

All taken together, the post has multiple issues; there is very little original material, a substantial amount is copied from elsewhere and can't be considered a quote supporting your own words, and the post fails to address the question, so I deleted it.

(and on a technical note: the OP never revealed the tool used to produce that warning; perhaps that tool uses a different scale or algorithm, and 7 is indeed 'high' in that tool?)

  • Let me start by saying thanks for your post here.... Technically I did not copy the 'complete' text of the linked material, I copied 2 out of 3 sections. – Paul Zahra Feb 8 '17 at 11:54
  • Both of the 2 sections being relevant as the OP stated "But I'm a bit confused on how I could rewrite it in such way so it works."; I therefore copied the first section which highlights how the score of 7 was ascertained, and the second section merely illustrates in a simple tabular form what I was saying, that 7, by some peoples standards, is not too high. – Paul Zahra Feb 8 '17 at 11:55
  • And finally as to why it isn't a valid answer (When considering links to external sites, quotes and my own text I could not have posted as a comment on their question)... stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer explains... In the section 'Answer the question' : "Any answer that gets the asker going in the right direction is helpful..." – Paul Zahra Feb 8 '17 at 11:59
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    @PaulZahra: you copied a substantial amount, and your post is 95% copied material. This is way too much. You could explain in your own words how the complexity metric works instead (with the source material backing that up, rather than be the main prose). – Martijn Pieters Feb 8 '17 at 12:00
  • Indeed but I can't see where it explicitly says this is not allowed... furthermore... as stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer in the section 'Provide context for links' "Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline." – Paul Zahra Feb 8 '17 at 12:04
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    @PaulZahra: I quoted the part from the help centre where it tells you to only use quotes sparingly. Take into account that copying other's work is normally a copyright infringement, but many copyright laws permit "fair use excemptions". Quoting text is one of those exemptions, but it has to be clear that the quotes are there to support original works, and you can't just copy huge sections as you did here. – Martijn Pieters Feb 8 '17 at 12:09
  • Okidoke... once again... thanks for your time and effort to explain your logic to me... I understand and agree... perhaps I was being a bit too pedantic in my questioning your logic, for which I apologise... do you recommend I just let it be... or is it worth me editing the post?... sorry I'm in a rush... going out the door now... – Paul Zahra Feb 8 '17 at 12:22
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    If you still feel like editing it into shape, including perhaps addressing how to still reduce it if they want to hold on to that very low setting of 7, then feel free to flag it afterwards again for a new assessment. – Martijn Pieters Feb 8 '17 at 12:34

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