5

It is true that if you're working with x86_16 or x86 real mode in general, you are probably using some flavor of DOS, be it MS-DOS, FreeDOS, etc. A lot of questions about real-mode assembly programming include either or .

However, if the question does not specifically relate to DOS or MS-DOS, is it still appropriate to include one of those tags? I often edit tags such as out of programming questions if the question doesn't specifically relate to Windows, or , for example, if a question is about the C or C++ language but not the IDE itself - the fact that they are using that system is not really relevant to the question.

Should I apply the same logic to questions about 16-bit assembly?

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    I would say no. It is only applicable if the question or code uses the DOS API or can only be observed on DOS system. – rene Feb 7 '17 at 17:35
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    It is a pretty decent contextual tag. Most of these questions are asked with the [assembly] tag, it isn't specific enough to narrow down to this antiquated kind of programming. [real-mode] could be an alternative, but it is very small. – Hans Passant Feb 7 '17 at 18:26
  • Same question, different tags meta.stackoverflow.com/q/342436/792066 – Braiam Feb 9 '17 at 0:56
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No.

If the question is not actually about DOS programming or the DOS APIs, then it should not use the tag.

All questions about real-mode x86 programming should use the tag.

Arguably, any question with the tag should also use the tag. (At least, this is my opinion. Even though it's 16-bit real mode, it's still x86 programming, and so should still have that "master" tag.)


Basically, if you're doing x86 programming, you want the tag.

  • If you're doing real-mode 16-bit programming, you also want the tag.
  • If you're doing long-mode 64-bit programming, you also want the tag.

Then, you should add a language tag (e.g., , , etc.).
If it's , then:

  • Also tag with the actual assembler that you are using (e.g., , , , etc.).
  • If your question is specifically about AT&T syntax, you should consider adding the tag.

Then, you should add an "environment" tag—for example, , , , , etc. Or maybe you are building a boot loader and aren't operating in the context of any OS (this is a very popular type of question, for some reason). In that case, you would use the tag.

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    This is absolutely perfect. – Jonathon Reinhart Feb 8 '17 at 14:05
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    Q: However, if the question does not specifically relate to DOS or MS-DOS, is it still appropriate to include one of those tags? A: No. ... Then, you should add an "environment" tag—for example, dos. R: Maybe I misread this, but isn't this just the yes to the no? – Sebastian Lange Feb 8 '17 at 14:20
  • @sebastian It doesn't seem unclear to me. If the question does not specifically relate to DOS, then you don't use the DOS tag. If it does (i.e., your "environment" is DOS), then you use the DOS tag. The point is, just because you're doing 16-bit real-mode programming doesn't necessarily imply that you are using DOS. DOS happens to be a 16-bit real-mode operating system, but it certainly isn't the only one, and you might not even be using an OS (as in the example I give, where you're writing a boot loader). – Cody Gray Feb 8 '17 at 14:29
  • @CodyGray When I read that block, I read: specifically related as in not my environment but actually DOS-API or DOS functions. The text says he often edits posts about C/C++ with windows-tag (as your mentioned environment), but removes windows tag, since the question is not about windows/MS-*: the fact that they are using that system is not really relevant to the question. Maybe the intention of the author is not totally clear, whereas I support your explanation of how to tag. – Sebastian Lange Feb 8 '17 at 14:36
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    I don't think I understand your comment, @sebastian. I guess the word "environment" is confusing? Obviously don't add tags that are irrelevant to your question just because you happen to be running a particular operating system. If you are asking about a C++ standard library feature, it doesn't matter if you're running Windows and you shouldn't include that tag. Same thing if you're asking about the most efficient way to clear a register in x86. You don't need to include the [dos] tag just because you're running DOS. You only use it if the question is about DOS programming. – Cody Gray Feb 8 '17 at 15:03
  • TL;dr: use the tags that are relevant to the question. – Braiam Feb 9 '17 at 0:51
  • It was actually suggested previously that we blacklist the [dos] tag, just like Super User has done, because its so badly misused. Mostly because the endless Windows batch-file questions but also the occasional denial-of-service question. That would mean retagging DOS operating system questions with the less abused [ms-dos] instead of the other way around. meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/320573 – Ross Ridge Feb 9 '17 at 1:53
  • Thanks for the note, @Ross. I had somehow missed that discussion. Definitely something to consider. – Cody Gray Feb 9 '17 at 12:05

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