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My question is at least loosely related (but not identical to) this one.

Most of the answers I've seen related to Community Wiki have focused on the advantages to the community of marking something as Community Wiki. The official explanation of why you have these is "One of the goals of the website is to be a continually evolving source of good information. Community wiki posts help enhance the wiki aspect of the site." In other words, it's an advantage to the community.

My question is what the advantage of having a Community Wiki answer is to the individual. Given that you can't gain reputation for Community Wiki answers, what's the incentive to mark your own posts as Community Wiki (other than to avoid losing reputation on something that's likely to be downvoted)? I'm a little confused as to why you'd ever want to do that for a high-quality answer.

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    Contributing to the community satisfies. This satisfaction is one of the advantages to the individual. It doesn't always have to be reputation or badge. – Maroun Feb 6 '17 at 18:29
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    You may find that, for whatever reason, you no longer want to maintain an answer. Maybe it's about a language/library/tool you no longer work with. But it's still popular so you start getting a bunch of comments asking you to change it when the lang/lib/tool has a major update. By marking it Community Wiki you allow others to keep it up to date rather than bug you about it or making their own answer that largely references yours. – BSMP Feb 6 '17 at 20:13
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    Sad to see that no one did use CW to answer this question... (even if there is no rep on meta. Hey rep is not the only thing why ppl do answer !? Weird...) – Kaiido Feb 7 '17 at 4:54
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    Contrary to popular opinion, rep isn't the primary motivation for most people. – Magisch Feb 7 '17 at 7:03
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    @Magisch: Right. – Nisse Engström Feb 7 '17 at 14:01
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    Personally speaking, I only post community wiki answers for the most part and have done so for the last several years. I do it because I am disinterested in the rep and would prefer not to have the sole onus of having to curate the more than 1000 answers I have posted on the once tag I answer questions on. – talonmies Feb 7 '17 at 21:04
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My question is what the advantage of having a Community Wiki answer is to the individual.

Making you feel righteous, if your answer is merely compiled together from what already was answered by other's in comments, or your answer was banged in shape with the help of other users.

Given that you can't gain reputation for Community Wiki answers, what's the incentive to mark your own posts as Community Wiki (other than to avoid losing reputation on something that's likely to be downvoted)?

Your answer may get downvoted in situations described above, by users that think what you're doing is kind of plagiarism.

I'm a little confused as to why you'd ever want to do that for a high-quality answer.

If you have given a high quality answer based completely on your own work, I don't see much reasons why to do so.

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When I copy an answer directly from another user's comment, without adding any information of my own (besides the attribution), I mark it as CW. There's absolutely no requirement to do this, but personally, I don't like getting rep for other people's work, no matter how trivial.

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When I come across an old question where the user has edited their solution into the question, and the user is no longer around, I sometimes remove the solution from the question and repost it as a Community Wiki (with appropriate attribution).

7

I sometimes use community wiki answers on typo questions or something with a similar trivial problem. When I feel that a comment next to the close vote does not suffice and it's better pointed out in an answer with formatted code, I refuse to take reputation. I'll mark my answer as community wiki, and point out in a comment that the OP may as well delete the question. And of course vote to close.

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    Ah this points to a thought : Can well received community wiki answers block asker's ability to delete his question ? In this case shouldn't we just VTC "typo" + kind comment to OP instead ? (I'm really wondering). – Kaiido Feb 7 '17 at 4:53
  • As far as I know, the OP can not delete a question that has an upvoted answer, or more than one answer. – Nisse Engström Feb 7 '17 at 13:55
  • Yes, by posting a CW answer I'm trying to prevent other users from posting answers that all would get quickly upvoted for their obvious correctness. – Bergi Feb 7 '17 at 16:54
  • In your experience, how effective is this approach, @Bergi ? It wouldn't be half bad to have an alternative strategy for dealing with extremely trivial questions that can't (or won't) be closed as typos. – duplode Feb 7 '17 at 19:16
  • @duplode Yes, it can work quite well. A good example can be found here – Bergi Feb 7 '17 at 19:36
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In my particular case, since I haven't seen this suggested anywhere....

I made this answer a community wiki because I wanted to encourage other users to help make this the canonical dupe target for the plague of low quality questions the tag was seeing at the time for this particular error, and at the same time not be seen as trying to cash in on what could easily have been seen as a cash cow.

What was in it for me directly?

I don't have to spend anywhere near as much time now on these errors and the ones that do appear are on average seemingly of a lot better quality and aren't caused by people misunderstanding the fundamentals.

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This is the last time I marked a question as a CW. Since all I'd done was take another user's code and replace a List<String> with a StringBuilder I felt it would be stealing rep to not mark it a CW.

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Another use case: you see a recently posted question which has a comment suggesting a solution and an answer from a different user. The solution in the answer is inferior to the one in the comment. That being so, you make an answer out of the comment, in an attempt to prevent the asker from accepting the other answer, and mark it as Community Wiki to disclaim the reputation.

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