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I read this question and flagged it as too broad along with some constructive comments.

The question was how to make an user draw shapes in a window and then calculate how many circles were enclosed, with some restrictions. I commented what was wrong with the question and gave some guidelines on how the questioner could solve the problem. He/she commented back and said that the guidelines I provided was the answer he/she was looking for.

Is it on topic to ask for guidelines to solve a bigger problem?

Some acceptable answers contains no actual code but instead general guidelines or pseudo-code, so it seems to be acceptable in certain cases. But in many cases I would believe that these questions are too broad since there are many possible ways to answer them, but I cannot find anything in what can I ask? and what should I avoid? about these types of questions.

And still, too broad is defined as "There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format". An answer with a couple of bullet points don't need to be too long and thus not too broad. Could it be that these questions aren't specific enough?

I understand that asking about specific algorithms is on-topic but is asking "What are the procedures to implement a help pop-up window?" a valid question? In other words; questions that are about bigger concepts than just one algorithm.

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    Possible duplicate of Is a question about the right algorithm on topic on Stack Overflow?. (Briefly: yes it is.) – Nathan Tuggy Feb 5 '17 at 0:33
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    @NathanTuggy I wasn't referring to a specific algorithm but more of directions to implement a concept. For example, is "What are the steps to create a voice input?". Is that a valid question? I do understand that asking about specific algorithms is on-topic but I've hard seeing for example the question I linked to as a valid on-topic question. Am I wrong in that regard? – Ted Klein Bergman Feb 5 '17 at 0:59
  • I believe the linked dupe mostly explains how such questions can at times be too broad or unclear (if they're poorly-specified). In this case, I think the question is on-topic, but it's not a particularly wonderful example, because it's not very concise. – Nathan Tuggy Feb 5 '17 at 1:23
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    FWIW, a lot of people use the Too Broad reason to cover now-extinct close reasons, like when a user just needs to do more research or try more things on their own before asking. – TylerH Feb 6 '17 at 15:45
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    I often find myself asking "What is the Right Way?" kinds of questions --- where I have a specific issue I'm hitting, but I really want to 'learn how to fish', not just get this one fish. Or in other words, many of the answers I find most valuable on SO are "best practices" guidelines --- "you can do that, but in the long run it's inadvisable, try this way instead." If there were some keyword that says "I'm soliciting 'lessons learned', best practices," it might help distinguish vague questions from questions that are honestly looking for these kinds of high-level guidance. – Scott McDermott Feb 6 '17 at 16:28
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Is it on topic to ask for guidelines to solve a bigger problem?

Yes, as long as the asker frames their question with enough detail on what they are trying to do so that the question doesn't:

  • Unavoidably require unreasonably long answers (be it due to needing too much code or explanations of too many things);
  • Make speculative answers unavoidable (i.e. you have to guess what the asker is trying to do);
  • Invite an endless list of suggestions in the answers.

I would believe that these questions are too broad since there are many possible ways to answer them

"Many" isn't necessarily "too many". In particular, there being more than one way to explain something doesn't make a question about it too broad.

I understand that asking about specific algorithms is on-topic but is asking "What are the procedures to implement a help pop-up window?" a valid question? In other words; questions that are about bigger concepts than just one algorithm.

A vague "What are the procedures to implement a help pop-up window?" question is indeed too broad, but not because it is "about bigger concepts". From the point of view of the asker, it isn't about any specific concepts; in such cases, the asker typically just wants to achieve something and have no idea how to do so. That forces the answerer to cover way too much ground in order to cover the (real, or presumed) gaps in the asker's knowledge -- ergo, too broad.

I read this question and flagged it as too broad along with some constructive comments.

You did correctly. The original revision of the question is too broad, as to answer it you would have to either write the whole thing for the asker or to guide them by the hand, step by step, from the very beginning. The current revision isn't stellar either, as the added code doesn't seem quite minimal, and isn't explicitly connected to what is written in the paragraph above it, but it probably could be worked into something acceptable.

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Asking how to go about doing something is definitely on-topic, and many times such questions and their answers are more useful than questions just asking for code. Such requests can still be too broad if there are too many possible answers or good answers would be too long for the format.

Who knows, such questions may even eventually be able to be solved very simply using a new built-in method, library, etc.

  • Yes, I do appreciate questions that ask how to go about doing something, but I was wondering if it's on-topic to ask about more general steps to achieve an bigger idea. For example "What are the steps to create a video player?". – Ted Klein Bergman Feb 5 '17 at 1:24
  • If the question is about programming, is narrow enough in scope, etc. then yes. The question you posed in your comment may or may not be off-topic for any number of other reasons, but not because it is asking how to go about doing something. – user4639281 Feb 5 '17 at 2:56
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Is it on topic to ask for guidelines to solve a bigger problem?

Lets put it this way: asking about how to get to the moon is too broad, asking how to build the rocket to get to the moon is too broad, asking about what route has to be taken to get to the moon is too broad; asking about how to get telemetry out of a device that happens to be to give you the information you need to calculate the route in your rocket to get to the moon, is not too broad.

  • I'm sure this is obvious, but the device is something you need to build your rocket. – Braiam Feb 5 '17 at 2:01
  • Why the downvotes? I like metaphors! – Cullub Feb 7 '17 at 0:37

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