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Frequently when scanning my feed of questions I'll notice a question with 100+ upvotes (usually asked several years ago to get that kind of traction) that was just answered by a user with < 2000 rep. (Example). Almost invariably the answer is either:

  • Wrong
  • Blatant plagiarism of an existing answer
  • A poor(er) version of an existing answer (i.e. the answerer couldn't be bothered to read the existing answers)
  • Otherwise of questionable value.

Although I did not dig years back in my own profile, I'd bet money that I did this at some point early in my Stack Overflow membership simply by virtue of not knowing any better.

The question in my example is perhaps telling: It was asked in 2011 and has continued to draw answers of varying quality every single year. It was protected late last year and has drawn 8 Answers since then.

I almost always downvote with a comment (and flag in the plagiarism case). I realize that no matter what arbitrary rep threshold gets picked this will always happen, there will always be Stack Overflow users with more rep than sense. But it seems to me that setting the rep threshold required to post an answer on a protected question somewhere in the 1500-2000 range would cut down on a lot of the low quality answers.

Could we at least have maybe different levels of protected for questions that, while valuable/valid, are low-quality magnets?

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    I love this there will always be SO users with more rep than sense, and also seen more that once such type of answers for a 10000+ votes questions. I always wondered what made them post their answer on the first place – Alon Eitan Feb 3 '17 at 13:36
  • Maybe this specific example should be locked. It's not like there's gonna be a new method for that check any time soon. (And if there is, it could be unlocked to allow a couple of answers, again.) – Cerbrus Feb 3 '17 at 13:37
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    @Cerbrus that's certainly true in this specific case, but not necessarily the general one: many programming languages are under active development or introduce breaking changes at some point (e.x. python3). Otherwise we could just auto-lock any question that's over n years old with an accepted and/or highly-upvoted answer(s). – Jared Smith Feb 3 '17 at 13:40
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    Agreed. The auto-lock may have to take activity into account, as well. I think the 1.5-2k limit might be a little high, even though it still wouldn't have blocked 4 out of the 5 newest answers on there. Rep restrictions like that are tricky. – Cerbrus Feb 3 '17 at 13:42
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    I'd rather we scrapped the concept of Protected Questions entirely (at least on Stack Overflow - they may have value on other SE sites to prevent hordes of SO veterans ignorant of the smaller sites' norms from coming and causing a mess when their questions reach the Hot Network Questions section). We have the moderation tools to deal with these bad answers, there are bad answers everywhere anyway, and as you demonstrate quite well here, rep simply isn't a reliable predictor of whether a user will post something stupid. Restricting even more people from posting isn't an approach I'd favour. – Mark Amery Feb 3 '17 at 13:50
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    One thing that might help is if they made the new answers to old questions a real review queue. They could still keep it a 10K rep priv but as a real review queue it might get more eyes. – NathanOliver Feb 3 '17 at 13:54
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    @CodyGray The fact that it is not listed under review and the fact that it is not a queue. Its basically just a results page from a query. – NathanOliver Feb 3 '17 at 13:59
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    Another example: stackoverflow.com/questions/13968494/… – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 18:51
  • @CodyGray that's terrible, I usually flag such blatant plagarism for mod attention. How did all of those get upvotes? Especially the one with 24? – Jared Smith Feb 3 '17 at 19:23
  • "A poor(er) version of an existing answer" - Related meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/335548/… – Fermi paradox Feb 3 '17 at 19:34
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    I agree but I think having the limit in the thousands is absurdly high for the number of times it's actually a problem and not just a case of "I just don't like this answer or think it's not a great one". I think setting the threshold to 25 would probably be plenty. – TylerH Feb 3 '17 at 19:54
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    Maybe let the rep threshold scale upwards depending on question age. – Sombrero Chicken Feb 3 '17 at 20:16
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    How about the rep of the answerer should be at least the same as the highest voted answer has upvotes? – Teemu-callmewhateveryouwant Feb 3 '17 at 20:46
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    @Teemu that sounds promising – Jared Smith Feb 4 '17 at 0:05
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    Here is an example where users with rep in thousands swooped in to just add "yet another answer" :( That too was brought here on meta. – Abhitalks Feb 4 '17 at 16:04
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Questions can get protected by high-rep users, or when they accumulate three deleted answers written by low-rep users (if memory serves right). The only time when I saw questions become protected was when trolls targeted certain users, posting abusive garbage on a few questions with which the other user was involved.

So my impression is that protected questions are there to prevent spammers/trolls to flood certain questions with garbage. Sure, they can do that on separate, random questions instead, but that simply cannot be as intrusive for the site and for the user they had targeted. For this purpose, the current rep limit is perfect.

I also understand your frustration with all those late low-quality answers, but an arbitrary (and high!) rep limit would only lead to frustration for those low-rep users who could actually contribute to one of these questions. I agree with part of Mark Amery's comment (emphasis mine):

I'd rather we scrapped the concept of Protected Questions entirely (at least on Stack Overflow - they may have value on other SE sites to prevent hordes of SO veterans ignorant of the smaller sites' norms from coming and causing a mess when their questions reach the Hot Network Questions section). We have the moderation tools to deal with these bad answers, there are bad answers everywhere anyway, and as you demonstrate quite well here, rep simply isn't a reliable predictor of whether a user will post something stupid. Restricting even more people from posting isn't an approach I'd favour.

We have the new-answers-to-old-questions tool for >10k rep users. The kind of low-quality posts to old, popular questions you're talking about typically pop up in this listing. There's an incredible amount of not-an-answer posts being shredded each day, making use of this tool.

So I suggest leaving the system of protected questions as-is, in order to hinder trolls spewing answers on questions (especially considering that answering doesn't need registration). Anything more complicated than that can't be solved with a rep filter; we need mostly-human eyes on these posts, but we have tools to find them and to dispose of them once they're found.

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