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Even if my question is more general, an example of the problem can be seen here.

Quick description of the keys things that make this problem what it is:

  • The question is quite specific and thus doesn't get many views.

  • There is another quite specific question that looks like the first one. It is older and already answered.

  • The answerer of the second one (who probably treat all the questions with the same tags) blindly flag the first as duplicate.

What can I do to make my question (the first one) be taken seriously?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Martijn Pieters support Feb 3 '17 at 11:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    For the record: I am an expert in Python, Flask and Jinja2 (top answerer in 2 of the 3 categories, 2nd in Jinja2), and the question is most definitely a duplicate still. The person who closed the post is one of the maintainers of the Flask project, his judgement on this can certainly be trusted. This was not an abusive or random closure. Stick to approaching this with an open mind and engage David in a conversation, and you might actually get an answer out if this. Treat the community like you do so far, and you'll only end up being ignored. – Martijn Pieters Feb 3 '17 at 11:21
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First of all, there's nothing "abusive" in marking a question as a duplicate. Second, neither the number of views nor the age of a question are relevant factors when determining whether or not questions are duplicates. Third, you have no way to prove that the user who marked it as a duplicate did so "blindly". In fact, there is pretty good evidence that they didn't, since they are obviously an expert in the topic and were able to post the accepted answer to the other question. Assume good faith unless you have evidence to the contrary. Nothing smells funny to me here.

So…what we have here is merely a case where you disagree that your question is a duplicate of the other one. Which is fine, you are allowed to do that. However, you have failed to provide a compelling argument on technical grounds that your question is not a duplicate. This is what you should be doing, and as the "duplicate" banner advises, you should edit this information into your original question.

Note that "the answer provided…doesn't solve the problem" is not an argument against a question's duplicate status any more than it would be a valid question. Why doesn't it solve the problem? What went wrong when you tried it? Did you see an error? Did it not compile? Et cetera.

  • I disagree on pretty much all of your points, so let's divide that into several comments. "First of all, there's nothing "abusive" in marking a question as a duplicate" -> If I mark a random question as a duplicate of another random question, you would agree this is a abuse of the "duplicate" marking. – user6170905 Feb 3 '17 at 9:22
  • "neither the number of views nor the age of a question are relevant factors when determining whether or not questions are duplicates" -> If a question is viewed by many people there is a kind of control that operate itself. There is no such control if there is only one potential answerer who vaguely knows something about the topic. – user6170905 Feb 3 '17 at 9:23
  • "you have no way to prove that the user who marked it as a duplicate did so "blindly". In fact, there is pretty good evidence that they didn't, since they are obviously an expert in the topic and were able to post the accepted answer to the other question" -> Exactly, I have no way to prove it and that's what bothers me. I know his answer on the other topic is completely wrong but as it is on an other topic I can't complain there that it doesn't answer my question. – user6170905 Feb 3 '17 at 9:26
  • "However, you have failed to provide a compelling argument on technical grounds that your question is not a duplicate. This is what you should be doing, and as the "duplicate" banner advises, you should edit this information into your original question." -> That's precisely what I did. – user6170905 Feb 3 '17 at 9:26
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    It is clearly not a "random" question, so there's no evidence of abuse. "Assume good faith". And since there's no evidence of abuse here, the number of views is not relevant, either. Furthermore, what I actually said is that the number of views and the age of the question are not relevant to determining whether it is a duplicate. They certainly serve as a bulwark against abuse, as will this Meta question. But it's far more productive to use the tools that the system provides you, rather than to claim it is abusing you. Especially when it's not. You didn't do any of what I advised. – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 9:31
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    Also, not especially interested in an argument here. If you continue to disagree, use the downvote button. I am trying to help you get the question re-opened. If you want to whine about the system abusing you, then I'm not interested. – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 9:32
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    Yeah, a duplicate vote closing a a flask to Javascript JSON problem as the duplicate of another Flask to Javascript JSON problem is clearly completely random. – Pekka 웃 Feb 3 '17 at 9:47
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    @AnneAunyme that's super interesting. But it isn't valid JSON that you can put in Javascript's JSON.parse() and expect it to work. – Pekka 웃 Feb 3 '17 at 9:54
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    @AnneAunyme you're right, I didn't think clearly here and made the wrong assumptions about how this works. Apologies. I have one suggestion as to what you can do with your specific problem, let's continue in chat – Pekka 웃 Feb 3 '17 at 10:06
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    Well, this is all very interesting. It appears you know more than anyone else here who is trying to help you, which suggests that you do not actually need our help. I certainly don't know why anyone would want to chat with someone after they were told they "know nothing of what [they] are talking about." – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 10:06
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    @CodyGray to be fair, I did get this wrong on the technical end, not realizing this is inside a template, not necessarily the final code as it appears in the browser. (That doesn't change that the closing was certainly not "random"). Anyway, I guess we need to leave this to the community in that tag to sort out (or not)... – Pekka 웃 Feb 3 '17 at 10:09
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    Assuming you're not a total idiot, that suggests the question could afford to be clearer, @pekka. I don't know anything about the tech involved here, and don't claim to, but if two people who at least know something about it misunderstood the first time, there is obviously something to be improved. Slinging around accusations about how no one else knows what they're talking about, or is being "abusive", won't help anything. – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 10:12
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    You are the one that wants the question answered, @anne. Being able to explain yourself in such a way that you can be understood by other competent programmers is an important skill, and critical to getting a good answer here. Of course the question is clear to you—you wrote it. That isn't the important question. I would encourage you to adopt a less entitled attitude and stop assuming that everything is someone else's problem. – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 10:28
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    By "here", I meant "Stack Overflow". Sorry if that wasn't clear. The comment does explain how to avoid such a situation in the future. I'm hardly ever accused of being pedantic, and I don't understand how anything I'm saying here is pedantic. Sorry if you don't find it to be helpful. No one likes to be told that they are doing it wrong. – Cody Gray Feb 3 '17 at 10:57
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    @AnneAunyme: Keep your comments constructive please. Cody is trying to help you improve your question, so that you don't have to encounter this situation in the future. Ad Hominim attacks are not appreciated and fall foul of our be nice policy. – Martijn Pieters Feb 3 '17 at 11:14