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Not complaining, just asking, is there an etiquette or terminology that can be employed when requesting assistance, say with a code problem, where you don't want people to suggest redoing your company's architecture or suggestions to use an entirely different tool that you may not have available, etc?

For example, if I'm stuck trying to work out how to do something with MS Access or VB or whatever, and I state that my employer will only allow me to use those tools, it does me no good to have a dozen developers add comments telling me serious professionals shouldn't use Access or VB, or I should reengineer the company's data model, etc.

I understand that there may be better ways to use technology, but where I work this is what we have, and I'm trying to solve a specific problem today, using what is currently available to me. I know people think they're being helpful, but I can't simply tell my boss that we shouldn't be using Access and he needs to install SQL Server or Oracle this afternoon so we can build a proper application.

And by the way, I do appreciate all the kind assistance I have received from the community on this site, so please accept my gratitude.

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    If you've explicitly outlined in your post why you have to use/do what you are, the only other options you have are to downvote any answers which ignore these statements and make comments on them (politely) reiterating that you cannot change what you're using. (Keep in mind, though, that these answers may be useful for someone with your problem, but with the ability to change what they're using/doing.) – Kendra Jan 31 '17 at 14:31
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    Note that you can in fact tell your boss when you're required to use a problematic toolset. You can't exactly demand that they change it all immediately, but you are doing something wrong if you're not at least making them aware that the tools they're requiring are making it harder for you to do your job, and that there are superior alternatives. – Servy Jan 31 '17 at 14:33
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    The only thing I'd mention, which other answers didn't cover, is to flag the comments as not constructive. If you've clearly stated you can't use a particular tool, having comments saying "use this tool" are rubbish; however, worded correctly those comments can help future viewers (e.g. "Sorry to hear you can't use ToolX, as ToolX makes this particular problem trivial with FeatureY") – Tas Feb 1 '17 at 5:45
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    "can't simply tell my boss that we shouldn't be using Access and he needs to install SQL Server or Oracle this afternoon so we can build a proper application." Sure, but likewise it is encumbent upon you to make it clear to the boss, the downside of sticking with the current technologies. e.g. "using this tech. will increase developments cost by 10% & maintenance costs by 30-40%" Once you translate it into dollars, many management will listen. If they don't, then it's purely on them, you've done your duty. When I see WTE "boss says so" I want know "what did boss say when you pointed out.." – Andrew Thompson Feb 1 '17 at 6:03
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    As an aside, you really shouldn't be using MS Access :) – biziclop Feb 1 '17 at 16:01
  • "serious professionals shouldn't use Access or VB" -> lmao. seriously? Ever heard of legacy folks? :D – Mafii Feb 2 '17 at 11:39
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    -1 use JQuery instead – SGR Feb 2 '17 at 11:50
  • Please note that the answers aren't just for you, but for everyone else who comes across the question after you. They may not be as hobbled as you seem to be. – John Hascall Feb 2 '17 at 13:23
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In addition to Servy's advice about stating the requirements, I've also found that providing minimal information about that type of context helps sometimes, too. Think of it as "reducing distractions". This also has the added bonus side effect of forcing me to write clearer and more succinct questions.

For example, what is actually important? That your company requires you to use Access (for example), or that you are using it and have an issue?

If you say "At my company, I am required to use MS Access", expect comments on that (all with good intent of course).

But if you say, "How do I do X with MS Access?" there isn't much room for distraction. If you must, you can add a vague "Long story short, MS Access is my only option here" or, "for various reasons, I need to stick with Access". Statements like that lay down the requirement but minimize the opportunity for a critical response.

Also, if somebody follows up with "Why are you required to use MS Access?" bear in mind that you don't have to answer that. You can stop a potential comment argument in its tracks by not responding, or just quashing it with something like "Thanks and I agree, but for this project I'm locked in to MS Access", regardless of whether or not you actually agree.

All that said, these comments may be irritating at times, but they are made with good intentions and may still help a future reader. So another strategy you have is to change your reaction a bit, and expect these types of suggestions, accept that they exist, and let it slide. They may be distractions for you, but they're meant to help, and they may not be distractions for others.

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    Good response. The main thing I like to avoid is 1 or 2 people providing useful solutions, but 10 or 20 well-intentioned people preaching at me about why I'm essentially wasting my time or barking up the wrong tree, when I'm looking for a direct coding solution, not a philosophical debate over the merits of various programming technologies. Particularly when folks are adamant and even arrogant or insulting when they tell you your programming tool or language is a joke or a toy, that "real programmers" would never even think to use X, they use Y, and only novices and dilettantes use X. – Brian Battles Jan 31 '17 at 15:47
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    @BrianBattles that maybe but you also need to remember that the comments aren't just meant for you. If someone comes along with a similar problem and toolset but none of the restrictions you face, then these comments can point them in a more productive direction. Remember you have the power, if you don't want a "philosophical debate", don't participate driving the discussion forward. – Lankymart Feb 1 '17 at 16:19
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You can simply state in the question what the requirements are, in this case, that happens to include a particular toolset.

Answers or comments may mention that you have a problematic toolset. That's fine. It's useful information. It would mean that a complete answer would need to provide a solution using your toolset, so by all means vote accordingly, but also mentioning the problems with that toolset and a better option is entirely appropriate and useful additional information.

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Please provide examples of what you're claiming. This trope appears way too much, and it's repeated in every discussion about this site on Reddit and HackerNews.

Just recently, I stumbled upon this gem, meant as a sarcastic reply about how Stack Overflow works:

Q: Excuse me, but I have a very specific technical question based on an existing platform in my organization that is too embedded to change. Does anyone with experience on this platform know how to get past this discrete issue?

A: Why are you trying to do this with this platform. Don't you know this is sub optimal and contrary to best practices? You are an idiot. [marked as answer]

This does not happen. The "answer" that post claimed is not an answer, will not be posted as such, and if it is, it will be removed when flagged as Not An Answer, and will definitely not be marked as accepted by the asker.

Yet you claim the same, from your question:

a dozen developers add comments telling me serious professionals shouldn't use Access or VB, or I should reengineer the company's data model, etc.

From your comment:

1 or 2 people providing useful solutions, but 10 or 20 well-intentioned people preaching at me about why I'm essentially wasting my time or barking up the wrong tree

And:

folks are adamant and even arrogant or insulting when they tell you your programming tool or language is a joke or a toy, that "real programmers" would never even think to use X, they use Y, and only novices and dilettantes use X

I've seen thousands of questions over the years, both when recently asked and when aged a bit, I comment more than I answer, and I hardly ever see this behavior. Especially not "10 or 20 [...] people preaching".

Then still, one comment stating that you shouldn't have to choose between a shoe and a bottle for hammering a nail into the wall doesn't hurt. It tells later readers that the situation in the question is suboptimal to begin with, so if they can still choose, they should choose another path to get to their goal.

Also, those comments don't prevent people from posting answers. They're comments. Not answers.

Now of course a "circlejerk" can arise in comments, where people upvote the initial comment and post supportive comments, essentially starting an off-topic discussion in the comments below your question. That can be flagged as well. Make sure your question mentions your constraints, making the comments obsolete, and flag your post for moderator attention and ask for the comments to be removed.

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