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I know there is a lot of discussion on meta about whether minor edits should or should not be allowed. I'm more concerned about navigating the site in its current state.

The code sample in this answer is missing a closing brace. Call me OCD, but it's bugging me. It can't compile in its current state. I would go ahead and add it, but it's too minor an edit.

Can anyone fix it? The OP? The author of the answer? Do you have to have a certain amount of rep or be a mod? Or is it just stuck?

  • Once you have 2K rep and can edit without review, you can change as many or as few characters as you need to – psubsee2003 Jan 27 '17 at 17:43
  • @psubsee2003 so the solution for low rep users is to leave a comment and let a 2k+ rep user fix it? What if one doesn't come along? Can the original author of an answer make the edit if they're <2k? – user3288829 Jan 27 '17 at 17:46
  • @duplode I figured the answer was on meta somewhere but was having an impossible time finding it. Thanks for the link. – user3288829 Jan 27 '17 at 17:47
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    @user3288829 the author of the post is essentially given mod-like powers on their own content (they can approve/reject edits, edit their own post, and they have limited ability to close their own post as a duplicate singlehandedly). So yes, they can edit the post without review and without worrying about character count – psubsee2003 Jan 27 '17 at 17:52
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    But the solution to the issue depends on the seriousness of the problem. (1) Comments are often good for minor issues that aren't actively harmful, especially when the author is still active on the site. (2) in many cases, you can usually find something more to fix to get the character count up. (3) For stuff that absolutely needs fixed right away, you can usually find someone with edit privileges in chat that is familiar with the technology in the question/answer. – psubsee2003 Jan 27 '17 at 17:54
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    I made the edit, but it's still a relatively low-quality answer, considering it's just a code dump. It's missing the actual answer. A good edit, and not coincidentally one that is longer than 6 characters, would have edited in a brief explanation. – Cody Gray Jan 27 '17 at 18:28
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  • @CodyGray: "Use this:". That's even nine characters! Would adding an explanation not be second-guessing the author? I've heard before that you should add an answer of your own, then. By the way, checking this answerer's profile showed activity yesterday, so a simple heads-up with an @ ping may have worked. – usr2564301 Jan 27 '17 at 23:02
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    I don't buy into that nonsense about "second-guessing the author". If you can make a good edit, and you are confident about its accuracy and usefulness, you should make it, @rad. If the author really doesn't like it, they can roll it back. Of all the edits people have made to my posts, the vast majority of them have been outstanding, especially the ones where someone took it upon themselves to add details, improve my explanation, elaborate a point, etc. The only edits I've ever rolled back are ones where people took out a critique of school systems who teach Turbo C++. – Cody Gray Jan 28 '17 at 11:20
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You can make any edit you want by adding the code &nbsp; at the end of the post. This is an invisible change to the end user, but being six characters long, it lets you get around the restrictions.

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    This will work, but it won't escape the notice of users and/or moderators, who will likely issue a manual editing ban for knowingly abusing the system. – Cody Gray Jan 28 '17 at 11:21

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