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I asked a now-deleted question that I considered not terrible. The short version is that updating my installation of MSysGit (Git on Windows) silently changed the configuration of my Cygwin HOME variable, without making any changes I could detect in configuration files or setting the Windows HOME environment variable. (Details of the specific configuration changes I checked for are in the question itself.)

My question was, how did the Git installer accomplish this? (E.g., is there some configuration setting I failed to check, or some backdoor to overriding the HOME configuration?)

My question was not how to fix the issue; in fact, I stated in the question that I'd already found a workaround (specifically, I set the Windows environment variable myself).

A user objected in the comments that I shouldn't be mucking about with a non-default HOME directory, and said the question should explain why I wanted this in the first place. I was reluctant to provide a reason, because (1) modifying the HOME dir configuration is not an uncommon request (there are at least three upvoted questions on the site about doing so, two of which I'd referenced in my question) or an unreasonable desire (Cygwin provides multiple ways to accomplish it); and (2) my reasons for desiring a non-standard configuration are not relevant to the question. When the user said they had an answer but insisted I provide my reasons for wanting a nonstandard configuration before they would post it, I went ahead and gave my reasons; the user then posted an answer saying I should use mount --bind to make the default HOME identical to the Windows HOME (!!!). This completely missed the point of the question, and in any case seems like a ridiculous solution to the problem of configuring the HOME variable. I told the user as much in a comment on their answer, after which they deleted their answer.

At the same time, the question received a single downvote. Since the aforementioned user's comments indicated that they thought the question was bad, and given the timing, I suspect that it was the same user who downvoted. Even if it was not the same user, no other user provided any comments with objections to or criticism of the question, so it's hard to guess what other problems anyone may have had with it.

No one else interacted with the question in any way. I do not think it was viewed much; at time of writing this question, it had 58 views, and since views are not unique to users (I think?), I expect most of those are from me and the other user. So, of course, my question was automatically deleted after 30 days, since it had no answer and a negative score.

What recourse do I have here? I've nominated the question for undeletion, and of course I may get lucky with the meta effect by posting this question. Would posting a bounty have prevented the automatic deletion? Should I have brought the user's behavior to the attention of Meta earlier? Would it have been appropriate to flag either the question itself or the user's comments for some sort of moderation intervention at any point? And is there any way (other than simply copying the content somewhere else) to preserve the question so that I can still access it after the 60-days mark (past which, if I understand correctly, it will no longer show up on my "deleted questions" page)? It seems sort of ridiculous that if only one user notices or pays attention to a question, they have this sort of power over it.

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    It died mostly because of inattention from you. Next time put a bounty on it. – Hans Passant Jan 26 '17 at 19:50
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    Not only can you not know the user's reason for downvoting, you can't even know that it was the user who deleted their answer who downvoted. So any speculation is silly and immaterial. The problem is you asked a software setup question about a non-standard setup and told the person who answered that their solution was ridiculous. And now you're here telling SO that their rules are ridiculous. What kind of discussion do you want to happen here? – Heretic Monkey Jan 26 '17 at 19:59
  • It isn't one user that has the power to delete something with a vote.... it's also that every people that visited it as well decided "meh" and moved on without voting, which a strong indicator of something being off. The fact that a subject matter argued it was a XY problem could have something to do with that... In any case, no, don't not ask for moderator intervention. And you can post a bounty... but keep in mind that doesn't imply voting (up and down), it simply implies more views... And I would never bring a user behaviour on Meta, that's uncalled for. – Tunaki Jan 26 '17 at 20:02
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    @MikeMcCaughan The user didn't provide an answer to my question, though (and frankly their "solution" was ridiculous). Also, I don't think my setup is/was particularly "non-standard", it's just not the default. And I wouldn't really consider my last sentence to imply that the rules are ridiculous, only that in instances like this they apparently have effects that I would consider ridiculous. As for the kind of discussion I'm expecting, HansPassant's comment is somewhat helpful, since it is a direct answer to the questions in my last paragraph. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 20:15
  • Also, I fail to see why the impossibility of knowing something for certain makes speculation inherently "silly and immaterial." The user made clear their views on the question in the comments; surely it's reasonable to suspect (though not, of course, to assume) that they may have voted in accordance with those views? – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 20:17
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    @Tunaki "every people that visited it as well decided 'meh'...strong indicator of something being off." I'm not so sure of this. My understanding is that if something is wrong with a question, the community is expected and encouraged to downvote. If people are ignoring a question, it seems more likely (to me, at least) that they simply don't know much about the subject matter or are not that interested in it. And based on the view count, which seems pretty low to me, I'm not even sure many users actually even saw the question. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 20:29
  • @Tunaki For clarification, when you say you "would never bring a user behaviour on Meta", do you mean that you think what I've done here (describing that behavior without specifically identifying the user) is inappropriate, or are you just saying that it would have been inappropriate if I'd posted a question here while my original question was still open and specifically complained about the comments, downvote, etc? – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 20:32
  • (To be fair, I couldn't have identified the user in this question even if I'd wanted to, because I don't remember their ID and I don't have enough rep to see the comments on the deleted question.) – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 20:32
  • @MikeMcCaughan Actually, you're right--rereading my answer, I did phrase it with the assumption that the user who downvoted was also the user who deleted their question. I've edited to clarify. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 20:45
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    related: List of all deleted questions, not only recent ones. It's about time to get rid of this restriction – gnat Jan 26 '17 at 20:49
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    And is there any way (other than simply copying the content somewhere else) to preserve the question so that I can still access it after the 60-days mark (past which, if I understand correctly, it will no longer show up on my "deleted questions" page)? After 60 days, you won't have a link to it in your profile. The question doesn't go away, and you can still see it, so if you simply bookmark the question in your browser you'll be able to go see it at any time, forever (or at least until SO shuts down). You'll just need to hold onto the link yourself. – Servy Jan 26 '17 at 21:18
  • @Servy I sort of assumed that I'd need 10K rep to see it once I lost the link--is that not true? – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:26
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    @KyleStrand That is not true. You need 10k rep to see someone else's deleted posts (at all, not just after 60 days), not your own. You need to be a mod to have links to all deleted posts on a user's profile. Even 10k users have to already have the link from before the post was deleted (or some other source besides the system itself) to get to the page. – Servy Jan 26 '17 at 21:27
  • @Servy Fantastic. Thank you; I'll remember that. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:31
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The question was not deleted by a single downvote. Yes, it is technically the reason for why it was deleted, but it would be an error to think that this technical reason is related in any way to the actual reason of deletion.

The truth is that it was deleted because no-one, in its 30 days of existence, cared about it. Not even yourself.

  • It was edited only one time, and that's only because another user argued for an explanation, clearly hinting at a XY problem. But there were no attempts to improve it, even after the downvote, and even after a couple of weeks. Editing bumps the question to the front page, thus potentially bringing it more attention.
  • About 50 people visited it according to the view counter, and only one of them decided it was worth voting on (up or down, it doesn't matter). The counter may be somewhat wrong, but the fact remains that subject experts following the Cygwin or Git tag read the question, and simply moved on without voting or commenting. This, itself, is a strong indicator that something is off with the question: it isn't bad and doesn't warrant a downvote, but it isn't interesting for the reader (like considered meh, clueless about the topic, wondering why someone would ever want to do such a thing anyway), and doesn't warrant an upvote. The possibility of just hitting the right 30 day period where absolutely no-one can answer it, and the people that could care are all out of votes is very thin.

Effort was clearly put into writing the question. But you also need to react based on the community's feedback by editing. And no feedback is feedback in itself. Keep in mind that if no-one cares about the question and it had some negative attention... it isn't worth keeping it at all (which is the reason for those automatic deletion).

Would posting a bounty have prevented the automatic deletion?

Technically, it would have. In practice, setting a bounty simply implies more views and more attention. There is always the chance that the right user for that question may see and answer it... but there's no guarantee it'll bring votes or the answers you're looking for. Still, this is clearly worth it when you think your question didn't have the attention it deserved.

Should I have brought the user's behavior to the attention of Meta earlier?

No. In fact, you should never have brought any user behaviour to Meta when dealing with supposed downvotes (and the hinted abuse coming out of it).

Would it have been appropriate to flag either the question itself or the user's comments for some sort of moderation intervention at any point?

No, moderators do not deal with questions not getting attention.

And is there any way (other than simply copying the content somewhere else) to preserve the question so that I can still access it after the 60-days mark (past which, if I understand correctly, it will no longer show up on my "deleted questions" page)?

Feature requests to remove this restriction were declined. But if you keep the link to the question, you, as author, will be able to see it, even after 60 days and regardless of reputation.

  • I understand what you're saying, and I find the second part of your answer helpful. However, I object to most of the first half. "...it would be an error to think that this technical reason is related in any way to the actual reason of deletion." That sentence makes no sense; the "technical reason" is in fact the mechanism by which the question was deleted, so of course it is at least part of the "actual" reason you propose for deletion. And I fail to see how your "actual" reason is anything but speculation, since the "technical" reason is the only direct cause we can be sure of. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:14
  • Second, you claim that I "didn't care" about the question, because I only edited it once. Well, I crafted the question carefully, and after engaging with the critical comments (and trying to take them constructively), and after re-reading and thinking about the question, it still seemed--and seems--to me to be exactly the question I wanted to ask, and as complete as I could make it in its details. If I had thought I could genuinely improve the question further, I would have done so. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:16
  • "The possibility of just hitting the right 30 day period where absolutely no-one can answer it, and the people that could care are all out of votes is very thin." On the contrary, I expect that it's very typical for reasonable questions to get little visibility or interest. This is purely a hunch based on (1) a general feeling based on my experience on the site and (2) various comments and questions on meta complaining about what types of questions are popular and what types are ignored. But neither have you provided evidence for your opinion on the issue. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:20
  • Also, I did care about the question enough to put a bounty on it, and would have put a bounty on it if I'd known it was about to be automatically deleted. (I only learned about the automatic deletion rules after trying to find the question, not seeing it, looking among all my StackExchange questions, realizing it must have been deleted, and finally looking up the rules for automatic deletion. By this point, of course, it was too late.) – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:21
  • @Kyle If you wrote the perfect question that can in no way be improved (clarified / simplified / others), yes, editing "just to bump" is pointless. This is, however, hardly the case in practice. The difference between technical reason and actual reason is that saying "it was deleted because of a single downvote", therefore implying that only one person had a say in it, is wrong. Every single user that didn't vote also had a say in it... – Tunaki Jan 26 '17 at 21:24
  • I didn't say I wrote the "perfect question." There may be an improvement that could be made. But the question, as it stands, is as good as I can make it, at least without additional constructive feedback. Note that I did address the only issue the user brought to my attention--namely, that the question could be misinterpreted as asking how to change the Cygwin HOME. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:29
  • "Every single user that didn't vote also had a say in it..." Well, every user that read the question had a say. Again, we have no way of knowing how many users that is. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:30
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    Also, per Servy's comments on my question above, I don't need to copy the content of my question to preserve it for myself; the question will still be accessible to me (even with <10K rep) as long as I save the link. – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:41
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    @Kyle I admit I forgot about that specific condition. Edited with a reference as well. – Tunaki Jan 26 '17 at 21:51
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Was this question ok to be deleted - based on number of up-votes for usefulness (0) and number of view (~60) this is regular on-off question and can be safely deleted automatically. There is no loss or SO overall due to deletion of the question.

What you could have done to keep question open:

  • put bounty is the way to preserve question till it has bounty.
  • post and accept answer
  • promote question through other means to obtain more than one answer/acceptable answer (i.e. post on Facebook, Twitter, Redit,...)

(See How does deleting work? What can cause a post to be deleted, and what does that actually mean? What are the criteria for deletion? for complete Roomba rules)

Whether any actions should be done about "user who made comments" - based on information in the post there was nothing that deserves any additional action. It is perfectly fine to express disagreement with usefulness of the question or provide alternative answers that presumable address real problem (i.e. if post looks like XY-problem).

Please also understand that the way people read your question/answer may be very different from how author believes it should be read (frequently authors skip large amount of context making questions obvious to them, but open to broad interpretation to everyone else).

  • Thanks for the advice. I certainly would have posted a bounty if I knew I had an expiration date on the question (I only read the Roomba rules after I discovered this question had been deleted). But I'm curious about your last paragraph--do you believe it applies to my question specifically? Especially after my edit, I really don't see how it could be misinterpreted by a conscientious reader. (E.g. I can imagine someone reading the first couple sentences and assuming the gist of question, but that's hardly a shortcoming of the question text.) – Kyle Strand Jan 26 '17 at 21:26
  • @KyleStrand your question is quite concrete, but it never stopped people from misreading questions... :) – Alexei Levenkov Jan 26 '17 at 23:34

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