-5

This question I asked was closed because some members claimed it was off-topic: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/41774201/in-version-2-1-0-why-is-marionettes-default-event-aggregator-called-vent?noredirect=1#comment70817814_41774201

I thought it was within the community guidelines of what was "on-topic", because the problem was a very common and important programming problem, i.e. understanding the code I was reading and writing.

The closers thought my question was opinion-based, because I was asking why something was named the way it was - but there actually was an objective answer from the author himself. Also, an objective answer could have just as easily been buried somewhere in the project's documentation, or an old issue page or a commit message that I never found.

So, I think my question was "on-topic". If not, can the answerer of this meta post please disprove me?

And if not, is there any site on SO that I could ask this (important) type of question?

UPDATE:

Immediately after posting this question, my question was deleted. I'm not sure if others can see it, so I'll quote it here:

In Marionette version 2.1.0, an event aggregator is given the name "vent". From [here][1],

The Event Aggregator is available through the vent property. vent is convenient for passively sharing information between pieces of your application as events occur.

var MyApp = new Backbone.Marionette.Application();

// Alert the user on the 'minutePassed' event
MyApp.vent.on("minutePassed", function(someData){
  alert("Received", someData);
});

Why is it called "vent"? Is this some sort of bizarre contraction for "event"? Is it a "ventilation shaft..." of events? This name really confuses me.

UPDATE:

Since this was closed, I can't add an actual answer. But I do have an actual answer, received from the author himself via email:

Hey Jackson,

From your question:

Why is it called "vent"? Is this some sort of bizarre contraction for "event"? Is it a "ventilation shaft..." of events? This name really confuses me.

Short answer: yes :)

I was trying to think of a name for it, and you guessed just about exactly what i was thinking when i named it. No real reason, no real meaning - just wanted a name other than "Marionette.events" because that had too many possible overloaded meanings.

- Derick

Please vote to re-open this question so I can add this as an answer and accept it. Thanks.

[1]: http://marionettejs.com/docs/v2.1.0/marionette.application.html#event-aggregator

EDIT:

It was suggested that this question is a "possible duplicate" of Is there a less restrictive Stack Exchange site specially suited for not too specific questions? I disagree that this is a duplicate of that question, because the question I was originally asking was very specific.

  • 14
    If you want to know why the author of some code did what they did ask them don't ask the entire programming population at large why that one person choose to use a given name for a given variable. All anyone else can do is guess. – Servy Jan 23 '17 at 20:39
  • 16
    It's trivia. You don't need to get an answer to that question in order to work with the tool. And I love trivia. Doesn't make it on topic. What I want to know is why it's bloody called "JSON.stringify". Stringify? Were they drunk when the ecmadouches came up with that name? – Will Jan 23 '17 at 20:43
  • @Servy I disagree that "all anyone else can do is guess," hence my argument "an objective answer could have just as easily been buried somewhere in the project's documentation, or an old issue page or a commit message that I never found." – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 20:45
  • 4
    It wasn't the case here, and in 99.999% of cases it won't be, and the questions aren't even useful in the very unlikely event that it is, so I see no reason for the questions to be here. As you found out first hand, asking the author of the project is by far the best way to get an answer, if you really care. – Servy Jan 23 '17 at 20:47
  • @Servy You claim that the question isn't useful, but it was certainly useful for me, because now I'll have a better understanding of this author's code when I'm working with it. – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 20:53
  • 1
    @Will The reason for "stringify" is because Douglas Crockford was the author of the original JSON library and had a bad habit of appending "ify" to his method names. And to further my argument, knowing that Crockford created JSON explains a lot about the data exchange format's versatility and reliability. – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 20:56
  • 6
    That's a lovely bit of trivia! Thanks for the info. But it's still trivia and we hate fun. – Will Jan 23 '17 at 21:00
  • @Will s/hate/hat ;) – NathanOliver Jan 23 '17 at 21:01
  • Now I want to know whether method names are thus crockified or crockfordified. Or maybe namified. – usr2564301 Jan 23 '17 at 21:38
  • 1
  • 2
    @gnat I don't think that works as a duplicate, as it only covers one aspect of what is being discussed here. I took the liberty of edit the title of the question to emphasise that. – duplode Jan 23 '17 at 21:49
  • 7
    "You claim that the question isn't useful, but it was certainly useful for me" and the same thing can be said for "debug my code for me" and "program this system for me" questions, they are useful for the author but very rarely useful for anyone else and them being useful for the author doesn't give them a free pass. would you consider "Why is VB Script Len named after a Succubus Cat Familiar?" a question that should even be asked? as the author i think it's useful – Memor-X Jan 23 '17 at 21:51
  • @Memor-X The answer to my question could have been useful for anyone else using the Marionette library. – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 22:20
  • Someone also suggested Is the purpose of questions to get an answer or spread knowledge? as a duplicate; while it is relevant to this discussion, it isn't a duplicate either. – duplode Jan 23 '17 at 22:26
13

As I explained in a comment on your question (quoting only what is relevant to your Meta question, and emphasis added):

Asking why something was named the way it was, besides being "opinion based", is not a programming problem. Knowing why it was called one way or another is not going to make code that does not work suddenly work. It's not going to improve performance. It solves no practical programming problem. There are other problems with what you are suggesting, but this is the most prominent one.

  • 3
    You haven't convinced me that "understanding code" is "not a programming problem." It's oft-stated that "reading and understanding code consumes much more of our time than writing it." – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 21:25
  • 9
    @Jackson You've decided to adopt a peculiar interpretation of what "programming problems" encompasses on SO. If we're to adopt your interpretation then I could argue that questions about sleeping habits are on topic because, well, just about any programmer is going to understand code better with good sleeping habits, right? Therefore questions about sleeping habits are on topic. – Louis Jan 23 '17 at 21:28
  • 4
    Knowing why a variable is named a certain way is not "understanding code" I can tell you exactly what var yesterday = Date.now(); does in JavaScript, without knowing why the variable was named "yesterday" instead of "today" or "now"... – Heretic Monkey Jan 23 '17 at 22:04
  • 1
    @Louis My definition of a "programming problem" is a problem related to reading or writing code. Sleeping habits are important, and some programmers should be told when going to bed will help them to solve their problems. But sleeping applies to many other activities too, so would probably be labeled "too broad" or "off-topic" here. In contrast, my question about the meaning of a word used by a programming library is exclusively applicable to programming. – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 22:09
  • 3
    but... a poor sleeping pattern could infact impact your ability to read/write code. – Kevin B Jan 23 '17 at 22:30
5

My take on this issue is perhaps a little softer than the one expressed in Louis' answer. It is not impossible for a question about a choice of name to be on-topic; however, the question cannot be solely about a choice of name, as on its own it is just trivia. More specifically, the question about the name must be clearly connected with a programming issue. By "clearly", I mean the connection should be either precisely stated by the asker or, lacking that, sufficently obvious and significant to the readers. I would say your question doesn't meet either criteria, and so its closure was appropriate.

See also: What's the minimum requirement for questions tagged with [naming-conventions]? Note, however, that it is more likely for a naming convention to have a clear connection with programming issue than for an individual name to have it, and so the likelihood of on-topicness increases accordingly.

  • 1
    Regarding, "the question about the name must be clearly connected with a programming issue:" To keep my question open, should I append a message like this? "I am beginning to maintain code that uses this library, and see "vent" being used everywhere. I'd like to understand why it's called that, to ensure I am properly using the feature, and not just blindly fumbling along, assuming I know what it means, and also know that the original author's use of the code was actually correct." And, perhaps, include a snippet of my application's code using "vent". That all seems a bit superfluous to me. – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 23:09
  • 2
    @Jackson It is superflous indeed. The superfluousness indicates you do not have a programming issue clearly connected with your question about the name, just a vague "I want to understand this better". – duplode Jan 23 '17 at 23:13
  • 2
    I don't see why "wanting to understand something better" cannot be a "programming issue" in itself. Programming isn't just about getting compilers to compile, or getting an avatar to show up on a screen. Beneath all that are APIs that we need to maintain - and I thought that understanding those APIs was implicitly useful. But based on the avalanche of downvotes and close requests, apparently fellow SOers disagree. Guess I'll be forever in the dark about C API function names, and other burning contraction questions I have, too. It's pretty depressing for a programming enthusiast like me. – Jackson Jan 23 '17 at 23:48
  • 2
    @Jackson The difficulty is that, on its own, "wanting to understand something better" is too vague. To pick an extreme example, a question that consisted literally of "I want to understand the Marionette event system better" is definitely closeable as too broad. – duplode Jan 24 '17 at 0:16
3

I think what you're getting hung up on here is a difference between two things

  • Nomenclature - Why things are named this way?
  • Syntax - How do I use this coding convention?

Syntax is always on-topic (and probably the #1 reason for duplicate closure). Nomenclature is where it gets more subjective (hence the lack of a hard and fast rule). In your example Ruby question, we see that the name actually ties to a class of functions that the authors wanted coders to use with caution. The nomenclature clearly relates to the syntax.

In your question, that link isn't made obvious

Why is it called "vent"? Is this some sort of bizarre contraction for "event"? Is it a "ventilation shaft..." of events? This name really confuses me.

While I agree it's confusing nomenclature (and there's always the curiosity factor) it's also clear what it does (per your quote of the documentation)

The Event Aggregator is available through the vent property. vent is convenient for passively sharing information between pieces of your application as events occur.

So, at this point, it's curiosity driving this. Ironically, your answer from the author actually proves why it's off-topic(emphasis mine)

No real reason, no real meaning - just wanted a name other than Marionette.events because that had too many possible overloaded meanings.

So it's cool to know why he named it that way, but it doesn't actually change anything about how to use the code. He just picked a syntax and went with it. Every coder has to do that sooner or later. Potentially there's thousands of such questions, but they don't help people write code.

2

A question about the meaning of an identifier would be off-topic as trivia (=non-notable fact).

But a question (even the same one but formulated differently) about the meaning of terms used in a library would be on topic (example).

Because it's immediately obvious that you have to understand the terminology to use the library. While the statement that knowing the exact origin of some specific identifier's name will help you in some valid goal is questionable at best (even if it's true).

To summarize, the formulation (=> the stated focus) of the question is important. Because people aren't going to spend their time figuring out how and why your question is on topic. You need to to tell them.

  • Good points. I'm just unsure whether it is possible to reformulate the specific question brought here by the OP in this way. – duplode Jan 24 '17 at 0:21
  • @duplode let's see... The OP wonders about the choice of term rather than a specific identifier. Because such a strange name has him confused about its exact meaning. I.e.: does it carry any bizarre implications about the semantics and/or behaviour? Is it a part of some larger naming scheme, thus affecting other (present and future) names (and their meanings)? These two concerns can be given objective answers based on evidence, regardless of whether the original author steps in to explain their motivations firsthand. – ivan_pozdeev Jan 24 '17 at 0:37
  • That might work. I still feel there should be a threshold of significance of the name involved (e.g. the reformulation would work better if "vent" were a term used in more places across the library and its documentation than just as the name of the event agregator property). It seems hard to specify exactly where such a threshold should lie, however. – duplode Jan 24 '17 at 1:56
-7

There is precedence for questions about the meaning of identifiers in code. See Why are exclamation marks used in Ruby methods?, which provides insightful answers for all users of the Ruby language. There are answers from several sources, only one of which is from the language author.

The usefulness of the meaning of identifiers in the Ruby standard library implies that there could also be some use in knowing the meaning of identifiers in a popular JavaScript library.

  • 4
    I would say that Ruby question is a good example of the second scenario I mention in my answer: the naming convention reflects a meaningful and relevant distinction which presumably was immediately spotted by readers familiar with the language. – duplode Jan 23 '17 at 23:03

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .