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I had a 0 vote question about a framework that has evolved over the last 5 years. The author of the framework commented that the question is no longer applicable, since that version of the framework is very unlikely to be used any more: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7608114/orchard-commands-transactions?noredirect=1#comment70699082_7608114

Also, it didn't have any answer or comment (other than the one I received today)

Should I close the question, or should I leave it as is?

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    If it were me I would delete it. There's no answer to save for posterity and if the problem has ceased to be a "live" one, I sure would not want to get the notifications from new answers and comments. – Louis Jan 20 '17 at 12:18
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    Just because there are newer versions of software available doesn't mean that there isn't some poor schmuck out there stuck with an old, outdated one… – deceze Jan 20 '17 at 12:18
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    @deceze And that poor schmuck is welcome to ask their question on SO when they run into a problem. Someone for whom the issue is "live" is more likely to be active in responding to answers and comments. – Louis Jan 20 '17 at 12:21
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    @Louis Between now and the day that poor schmuck needs a solution, someone who knows a solution may drop by and post it. – S.L. Barth - Reinstate Monica Jan 20 '17 at 12:32
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    @S.L.Barth That can happen. Another thing that can happen is someone landing on the question before it gets an answer and placing a bounty on it. And the question gets downvotes because "you're shooting yourself in the foot by using an obsolete version" or because the question is deficient in another manner. I've seen it happen. So the author of the question gets downvotes on a question that no longer asks something they need solved. – Louis Jan 20 '17 at 12:54
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    What is the issue with leaving the question out there if it isn't a bad question to begin with? – Joe W Jan 20 '17 at 13:19
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    You could at least edit your post and state, that your question is addressing a specific older version and you want it to work with that. – DuKes0mE Jan 20 '17 at 14:21
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    @gnat I'm not sure this question is a duplicate of the the question ban one. I'm not asking about that, though the answers are similar. – Jaap Jan 20 '17 at 21:30
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    @Jaap Don't worry about the dupe vote. Claiming completely unrelated questions are duplicates is sort of gnat's entire reason for coming to meta. You get used to it. – Chris Hayes Jan 20 '17 at 22:14
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    In this particular case, I'd leave the question. It's a little unfortunate that the answer (as bad as it was, consisting of just a link) was deleted, removing what little useful information there was. I'll reproduce the link in a comment if that's ok. If I had infinite time, I would reproduce the useful information from the linked thread in a new answer, but that seems like a waste of time given the obsolete nature of the question. – Bertrand Le Roy Jan 21 '17 at 0:52
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    You are ultimately the one with the question. If you don't care about it, you have every right to claim no further involvement with it, and it is perfectly fine to express that disinterest by deleting your question. – Braiam Jan 23 '17 at 10:47
  • @Louis I don't see why a good question would get downvote because "using an obsolete version". We are stuck to obsolete versions everywhere by many different reasons. – EMBarbosa Jan 23 '17 at 12:38
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I would leave it alone.

  • The fact that the original author has commented is useful for people coming to the question later.
  • The question is valid as it stands, even if it has no answer yet. An answer may come.

It is doing no harm, it is not giving incorrect information, and "Obsolete" is not a valid close reason.

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    "The fact that the original author has commented is useful for people coming to the question later." Comments are ephemeral so the content should be ported into an edit, if it's useful. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jan 22 '17 at 14:53
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit why not ported into an answer? if that's the only real outcome of the question, then why should it not be seen as the endpoint? – Jake Millington Jan 23 '17 at 2:29
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    @JakeMillington: Because it is not an answer or an outcome. It is a potential constraint on the question. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jan 23 '17 at 2:46
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit: Potential? If something is proven as obsolete (not to mention, by the author of the framework), then surely that is definitive. – Jake Millington Jan 23 '17 at 3:11
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    @JakeMillington Because sometimes you're forced to work with old versions of products/libraries/other. A question about "How to copy something to the clipboard on windows 3.1" would still be a valid question even though windows 3.1 is obsolete and we pity the poor guy who has to code for it. – Gabe Sechan Jan 23 '17 at 6:57
  • @GabeSechan Right. So a different question would cover a different version. Makes sense. Thanks. – Jake Millington Jan 23 '17 at 7:19
  • @GabeSechan that's the most counterproductive and annoying way to solve stuff, imagine there's a new question for each version of software, absolute madness, compared to a single question with all possible answers. – Braiam Jan 23 '17 at 11:08
  • @Braiam yes, because when I want to solve something for a specific version I want to see the answers for 9 newer versions which aren't supported. Yeah, that's not only pointless, but confusing and frustrating. – Gabe Sechan Jan 23 '17 at 14:00
  • @GabeSechan why do you think that your problem is specific for that version? Why, if other versions are fixed, don't you upgrade, or ask for a backport of the fix? – Braiam Jan 23 '17 at 14:34
  • @Braiam Really? You think its always possible, much less desirable, to upgrade? Try doing some real world programming sometime. – Gabe Sechan Jan 23 '17 at 14:40
  • @Braiam: most questions and most answers apply across multiple software versions, so it would be ridiculous to split all questions as default, as you say. But it’s perfectly reasonable for some questions (or answers) to be version-specific — how else would the poor schmuck who has to code for Windows 3.1 ever get their answer? – PLL Jan 23 '17 at 15:17
  • @GabeSechan oh, yeah. I program in the way I have less problems on the long run, which usually is the latest stable version, like 99.9999999% of all programmers. – Braiam Jan 23 '17 at 15:58
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    @Braiam Now here's reality- you can't always do that. Migrating OSes could take months and you don't have resources. New versions of libraries won't have all the features you need. Or maybe you altered the library to your purposes and convderting those changes takes months. Its rarely the case that you can stay on the newest version of everything. Its not even necessarily desirable- new things are frequently buggy, its considered a good practice not to move to them for X months to wait for the bugs to shake out. Have you never done maintenance work ever? – Gabe Sechan Jan 23 '17 at 16:07
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    @Braiam You're right, it does. It also exists for people with it. Which means sometimes the right thing is to ask questions for specific versions. – Gabe Sechan Jan 23 '17 at 17:28
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    @Braiam You do realize that was removed as a close reason, and for a good reason, right? No, version specific questions do exist, always will exist, and will always have a place here. – Gabe Sechan Jan 23 '17 at 17:31
7

Chenmunka is correct that there is no good reason to outright delete this content (and you need a good reason to delete content) out of some notion of "obsolescence" (someone may come along with an answer in the interim, and you can't tell whether that may happen in five years' time the next time an attempt is made at asking the question).

However, the real problem with this question is that it is hopelessly vague. In its current form, it is not a question acceptable on Stack Overflow. No wonder it did not get answered in over five years!

Let's pore over the relevant points:

I'm trying to create a command that will run for some time. It harvests an external webservice and needs to insert or update ContentItems. It's using a service which is injected into the command.

I also want a progress record in the database that I can show in the admin using a custom controller.

Pretty vague, but we can probably accept this if the actual problem statement is clear.

I've run into several problems with the transaction each command lives in.

What problems?

In this command I want to handle my own transactions instead of using the default paradigm: "each command runs in it's own transaction".

What transactions?

I was unable to fix several issues I had.

What issues? Why were you unable to fix them?

Does anyone know a good way to do this?

Bordering on a poll question here. And what is "this"? Your goals were too vague to provide a useful solution off the bat.


The question needn't be deleted, but it should be closed pending improvement — and this may lead to a roomba-deletion in its present condition.

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    Note: if it wasn't for the answer that was recently deleted, this question would have been deleted by the system automatically years ago, as it didn't reach the 1.5 views *years – Braiam Jan 22 '17 at 15:15
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    @Braiam: Then let the system do so again if it deems doing so to be appropriate. We do not need to jump in here to destroy content. I do not understand why so many people lately get so giddy over going out of their way to destroy content. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jan 22 '17 at 15:16
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    "Destroy " what content? The question has little to no value, as it has no content. – Braiam Jan 22 '17 at 15:21
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    @Braiam: Says you! And, as above, says me also, but for very different reasons, meriting a very different way of handling the question :) – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jan 22 '17 at 15:28
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    No, says the metrics we have: in 5 years of existence, it hadn't gathered 200 views, one upvote (on either question or answer), not even by anonymous users. It is very far fetched to say it has any value, since nobody has demonstrated interest on it. BTW, anyone can ask that question, if they have it. – Braiam Jan 23 '17 at 11:01
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the question is no longer relevant

If it's no longer relevant, you can just delete it. Someone else that have the same issue, will ask the question that is relevant to them, which would in turn make easier for the people that can answer it, since any inquire they can have can be solved.

BTW, I've deleted irrelevant questions, because the issue no longer affect me.

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    I'm surprised this is an unpopular opinion. – BoltClock Jan 21 '17 at 7:10
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    @BoltClock Why? It's so much easier and faster reading a valid answer that applies to you than writing your own question and waiting for answers. – xtrinch Jan 21 '17 at 16:43
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    Even the answer that the question is no longer applicable is of help. – xtrinch Jan 21 '17 at 16:58
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    In my opinion researching a problem and finding outdated posts with no answers is very irritating. – Bugs Jan 21 '17 at 16:59
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    @Jinx88909 tell that to the the guy that propose to "leave it alone". – Braiam Jan 21 '17 at 18:00
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    @Jinx88909 It's irritating, but not sure if it's worse than not finding any post about the problem. At least you know you are not alone. – Oriol Jan 21 '17 at 22:50
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    @Oriol I share your sentiments, but I prefer them to ask the question a new... at least there would be someone interested in an answer. – Braiam Jan 21 '17 at 23:02
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    The solution to the no answers / not enough answers problem is to post a bonus. That won't help if the question is unanswerable because nobody knows the answer. Nothing will help that! – Stephen C Jan 22 '17 at 3:47
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    On relevance: how do we tell if a Question is no longer relevant? In general? In this case, we can't ... because despite the maintainer stating that the library is obsolete ... there make be a "poor schmuck" who has to use it. – Stephen C Jan 22 '17 at 3:50
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    @StephenC then, they should ask their own questions... why they shouldn't? – Braiam Jan 22 '17 at 7:55
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    I suppose from the look of things there are pros and cons to both sides and comes down to personal preference. – Bugs Jan 22 '17 at 10:25
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    There's no such thing as "my question" and "your question". The questions here all belong to Stack Overflow. You MUST NOT delete a question just because it's stopped being relevant to you. Whether you're the original poster or not, you don't speak for the whole Stack Overflow community. Why should someone else have to re-post a question just because you deleted it? – Dawood says reinstate Monica Jan 23 '17 at 8:48
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    Are you an authority on what things I'm interested in? – Dawood says reinstate Monica Jan 23 '17 at 10:47
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    One thing I want to mention on this, there's questions I personally avoided asking about more mature technologies (.NET / Win32) because I thought they were "too weird / too localized / too unlikely to help future visitors", plus I figured it out myself - result is, I didn't post about it. If I saw an unanswered question that happened to be something I avoided posting about, I'd answer it. A question without an answer is an invitation for an answer, the lack of a question I read as "nobody had this problem except you, so don't bother posting". – jrh Jan 23 '17 at 12:18

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