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After looking at this question I started thinking about why there would need to be a distinction between community-elected moderators and employee moderators, which then led on to the question of why publicly distinguishing normal users from moderators is even a thing.

Why can't moderators be silent guardians, watchful protectors, dark knights?

What benefit for the community is there that we know whether or not a person is a moderator or not outside performing moderator-level actions? The immediately obvious answer is that their input automatically carries more weight but personally I feel like it carries just as much weight as the frequent visitor that provides constructive contributions.

I, however, don't believe that to be the basis of reasoning for why it was decided to show moderator diamonds next to each moderator's name, so what was the reason?

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    FWIW, pretty much all communities/forums which have a notion of moderators denote those users in some special way. – deceze Jan 18 '17 at 10:33
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    @deceze Yes, although it seems like that convention, which was born for whatever reason, has trickled down and been inherited by all forum-like communities regardless of whether it has a purpose. It seems like the same might have happened here. – Shiri Jan 18 '17 at 10:37
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    Well, obviously the purpose is I have a ♦ and you don't neener neener. ;-) – deceze Jan 18 '17 at 10:38
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    Curse you and your special ♦ thing that I don't care about. – Shiri Jan 18 '17 at 10:40
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    Joking aside, I do think that adding some weight to the word of a moderator is a reasonable purpose. When a moderator bumps into a conversation and tells people to do/don't do certain things, that's somewhat easier to accomplish with a ♦ than if you appeared to be a regular Joe Schmo. (No offence to all the Joe Schmos on the site. – deceze Jan 18 '17 at 10:42
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    Albeit not related to moderators, but staff, as they get the same symbol. How would you feel to know a 100 reputation user single handedly closed your question? You might wonder why they have such power? But now with the symbol, you can be aware of it being done with due diligence as they have received specific training. Moderators on the other hand tend to get training in "the field" by participating on the sites and already have a high rep score. – Draken Jan 18 '17 at 10:43
  • @Draken I mentioned shortly in the question, possibly too briefly, that the question regarded the non-moderator-level actions across the site. Obviously users need to know that a user had the right privileges to perform something like a dupehammer. – Shiri Jan 18 '17 at 10:47
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    @Shiri extending your dupe hammer example which displays the gold badge so it's clear what's happened... It's worth noting moderators have binding votes. So while it normally takes 5 votes to close, or 3 to delete an answer or 3 to 10 votes to delete a question or 3 approvals/rejects in the review queue etc... it only requires a single vote from a mod. A visual indicator mitigates people wondering how an action was taken without the required vote threshold being reached. (there's quite a few questions about closed/deleted posts done by a mod at the time but who no longer hold a diamond) – Jon Clements Jan 18 '17 at 10:56
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    @Shiri in what cases do you think they're unnecessary? – Jon Clements Jan 18 '17 at 11:05
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    @JonClements I guess I worded that wrongly. What I mean is for certain actions that were able to happen because of a specific reason, for the reason to be displayed. That already happens; gold badges are displayed when questions are dupehammered, list of names are given when questions are closed for <reason>. Similarly, posts can be closed and re-opened (plus a wider array of privileges) because a moderator is a moderator, and I think the diamond should only be displayed in these cases. – Shiri Jan 18 '17 at 11:57
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    Blessed is he, who in the name of moderation and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his peers keeper and the finder of lost users. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who would attempt to poison and destroy my forum. – Tanner Jan 18 '17 at 12:04
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    @Tanner Say forum again. Say forum again, I dare you, I double dare you (censored), say forum one more (censored) time! :p – Jon Clements Jan 18 '17 at 12:07
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    The diamond is pretty much irrelevant to questions and answers on the main site. Aside from that and comments that aren't about moderation, I'm not sure I can think of any other place, though. – jscs Jan 18 '17 at 12:14
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    A related discussion has occurred on Community Building: "Should moderators always be denoted as such to the community?" – Andy Jan 18 '17 at 13:26
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    I'd suggest that being policed purely by secret police is not a good experience. – David says reinstate Monica Jan 19 '17 at 12:53
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  1. One of SE criteria for moderators is "leads by example"". Be it in posts, comments, chat, or meta, one expects that a moderator's behavior should be something to emulate.

  2. Not having diamonds everywhere would leave moderators vulnerable to impersonation. There are a lot of people called Matt (or Chris + something starting with F). And moderators probably make more than a few people unhappy in the course of their work.

  3. For multiple reasons, it is preferable to have uniformed police force, rather than patrols of undercover officers with concealed weapons.

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    Regarding the impersonation: Would SO stop me from choosing the a display name like " Admin ♦ "? – Manfred Radlwimmer Jan 19 '17 at 12:54
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    @ManfredRadlwimmer Yes, I'm pretty sure the system will not allow you to put the diamond in your display name. See this for example. – David Z Jan 19 '17 at 13:02
  • It is also a very clear indication that the action you are trying to reverse will not be able to as only another diamond can undo a diamond action. It is nice to see that visually and not have to cross check. – NathanOliver Jan 19 '17 at 13:18
  • imgur.com/a/n6on7 yes, the system forbids adding it :-) – Tschallacka Jan 19 '17 at 13:27
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Because, speaking historically, having "secret police" has generally not worked out so well.

Moderators should be open and accountable. We follow a modern, "western" model here.

I can't really fathom why you'd propose changing that, if indeed that is the purpose of your post.

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  • It was more of a wondering whether a specific decision was made regarding it or if it was kept because that's how it's always been. Inquisitive rather than propositional. – Shiri Jan 19 '17 at 16:33
  • Police officers where I live are allowed to take their uniforms off when they're no on duty. – jscs Jan 19 '17 at 23:08
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    @JoshCaswell: The notion of "off duty" doesn't directly translate to the internet, and moderators are basically always on duty here as long as they are visiting a SE page. Besides, you'll find that all photos of your police officers while they were on duty show them in uniform, and that those photos are not later digitally manipulated to remove the uniform to show that the officers are no longer on duty! – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 19 '17 at 23:30
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cop

Without the sign, speeders wouldn't slow down, which is useful if your town makes money from traffic tickets but doesn't really do much for safer roads.

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    So what you're saying is, we need to find a way to make money every time someone asks a programming question on Meta. – Cody Gray Jan 19 '17 at 13:41
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    @CodyGray No, what this is saying is we need to find a way to make money every time we close a question. – Servy Jan 19 '17 at 16:21
  • If only SO can charge for downvoted questions :) (or any other serious violations) – Alexei Levenkov Jan 19 '17 at 16:24

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