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As a gut feeling, SO is having more than its fair share of questions that are "rewarded" by psychic users' answers. That is, the questions are of poor quality and miss critical information. The question is nevertheless answered, but the answer is based on clairvoyance, mad skillz or just guessing the actual problem.

As a case in point, consider question that asks "add more rows above the output". The question isn't clear at all, and that's besides the original language problems. It never describes in concrete a way what's desired and uses odd terminology. In addition to a close vote, I did ask the OP to improve the post by adding desired output too.

Anyhow, it has attracted two answers. Is this really desired behavior?

Both answers describe how to create an array of PSObjects. These are likely to resolve the problem, I'll give you that. On the other hand, because the question is such low quality, I doubt if anyone is ever going to leverage this particular Q&A. As the answers are actually useful, down-voting would be unreasonable and petty.

If the community answers poor questions, it encourages asking poor questions. The stance on answering bad questions is already discussed, but that's more about people who wonder if answer or not. In this case, the answers are already posted and damage done.

To sum up: what, if anything, should be done to the answers in such a case?

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    As the answers are actually useful, down-voting would be unreasonable and petty. Interesting that you say that immediately after describing why these answers aren't actually useful. Given that these answers aren't actually useful, per your own description, and that there's no way to verify their correctness, downvoting would be entirely reasonable and warranted. The fact that people reward these unhelpful answers is why people keep posting them. Why bother providing a correct answer when you can just answer an unanswerable question and get upvotes because nobody can prove it's wrong. – Servy Jan 12 '17 at 14:18
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    The don't answer bad questions to dissuade future bad question askers theorem hinges on the assumption that not answering a question will in fact reduce the future number of bad questions being asked. I don't see how that holds true, given that most bad-question-askers are being blocked from asking eventually, and we still see a lot of crap every day by new users. – deceze Jan 12 '17 at 14:19
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    @deceze Your argument doesn't hold. The fact that there are still bad questions doesn't mean that answering them doesn't encourage that bad behavior (especially given that they are being answered). If others were arguing that not answering bad questions would entirely eliminate all bad questions then sure, but that's not what's being argued. There are more bad questions because they get answers than if they weren't answered. The fact that subverting the question ban is as easy as making a new account means that relying on it simply isn't going to do much to solve the problem. – Servy Jan 12 '17 at 14:21
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    Anecdotally I see plenty of users who keep posting questions without ever receiving one answer. Even users who often get their questions closed immediately often keep posting questions. If there is any message being sent by not answering such questions, it doesn't seem to have much of an impact on individual users. And it most certainly won't have much of an impact on other users. There may be some dissuasion factor at play, but it's not very strong IMO. Not strong enough to warrant punishing those answers for. – deceze Jan 12 '17 at 15:09
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    Having said that, I'd be happy to be proven wrong by actual data showing a measurable effect. – deceze Jan 12 '17 at 15:09
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    Not referring to your specific example, but in general just because someone is able to decipher a question that is unclear to someone else doesn't necessarily mean that they're psychic or guessing. Of course, if those psychic people want their answer to really be useful, they should edit the question into something other people can understand too. If a question and its answer are actually useful, there's no need to punish it just because the OP sucked at asking it. – Don't Panic Jan 12 '17 at 16:04
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As a gut feeling, SO is having more than its fair share of questions that are "rewarded" by psychic users' answers. That is, the questions are of poor quality and miss critical information. The question is nevertheless answered, but the answer is based on clairvoyance, mad skillz or just guessing the actual problem.

Yes, I've seen this, too. I'm not sure if it is actually a more rampant problem than it was a few years ago, though. But I agree it is a problem in the tags I follow.

Is this really desired behavior?

No, the questions should be closed to prevent answers, until such time as the requisite information is added to the question. If that never happens, the questions should be removed from the site.

Why aren't they? Because there are more people asking and answering questions than there are people closing questions. We don't have enough people or tools to keep the site clean, and not everyone who has the privileges to do so cares to exercise them.

As the answers are actually useful, down-voting would be unreasonable and petty.

I'm not sure how this follows from your previous claim. The answers aren't useful because they are just guesses, and more importantly, they are unlikely to help anyone else in the future.

Besides, I don't see voting either way as "petty" behavior. Upvote if you feel the answers are useful, clear, and correct; downvote if they are not; or abstain if you don't know or can't be bothered.

what, if anything, should be done to the answers in such a case?

Beyond downvoting in cases where you feel it is warranted? Nothing.

The problem should be addressed at its source: by downvoting and closing the question.

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    The problem should be addressed at its source: by downvoting and closing the question. But that doesn't address the source of the problem. That doesn't stop them from continuing to post more bad answers to bad questions going forward. – Servy Jan 12 '17 at 14:22
  • I'll continue to look for the "flog" button, @servy, but I haven't found it yet. If the questions aren't posted and available to receive answers, then people won't be able to answer them. As far as I know, that's the best we can do. – Cody Gray Jan 12 '17 at 14:24
  • If the questions aren't posted That's the problem, those actions don't stop them from being posted. If they did, then you are correct it would address the source of the problem. I'm not saying we shouldn't do it, I'm just saying it clearly doesn't actually solve the problem. – Servy Jan 12 '17 at 14:26
  • The answers are useful - in cases the guess was correct. This happens when the questions are about quite basic stuff. – vonPryz Jan 12 '17 at 14:28
  • Your forget one thing CodeGray : this question is the first question of the new user, so there was already the queue for them, but seems like it failed. (and the question is now closed) – Walfrat Jan 12 '17 at 15:10
  • Review queues often fail here, @walfrat, because a question can look good, but still be lacking critical information to make it actually answerable. Unfortunately, it often takes someone capable of answering the question to be able to make that determination, which means an expert in the tag, and that is not how review queues generally work. – Cody Gray Jan 13 '17 at 4:20
  • DVs are really only useful for those with "medium" reputation. For those with "high" reputation (say exceeding 10k), it's a case of the "the rich get richer." Those with "low" reputation don't care. So DVing doesn't really help that much with answers that shouldn't be there in the first place. – Ðаn Apr 12 '17 at 16:39
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Yes, any reasonably-competent programmer familiar with the topic can [daniel their way to a solution][2], but your ability to synthesize a problem statement where none is provided is no more an indication of clarity than is your ability to mentally insert missing letters into "Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde uinervtisy".

Basically, content that can't be found in a sensible manner, or that isn't clear enough to distinguish from similar but different problems are bound to be closed as unclear or too broad. Now your specific question is "how to avoid encouraging this behavior?", well, for one, we could make the asking questions a depletable resource, which in fact is, since there isn't an unlimited supply of people able to answer questions. There are some "rate limits" of sorts to fulfill this, but they aren't doing enough to do a impact on the site. The answers for the other hand would be lost... since nobody can find them.

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