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I have been doing some thinking:

I am a rookie developer, and I am learning the basics right now.

Stack Overflow has helped me immensely, and I appreciate both the presence of the site and of the community.

However I feel that the current structure of the site is a bit aggressive. Sometimes you really try your best, and then you might get stuck upon something that is really hard for you, but extremely obvious to others.

I have felt quite a lot of anxiety lately on whether I should ask a question or not. Sometimes this has been productive as it forced me to dig deeper before asking for help, but sometimes it gets plainly toxic.

For this I have been thinking that there should be two kinds of questions on Stack Overflow:

a) Permanent questions

and

b) "I am desperate for help questions" that will self destruct after 48 hours.

In order to put some limits upon help-vampires, each user should be able to ask only three desperate questions a month AND in order to not pollute the amazing educational legacy of the site, these posts will self-destruct after 48 hours.

Points gained by these questions and answers should be kept on a different reputation board, and for every 50 points earned through asking "desperate questions" you could be gaining 5 regular reputation points. Answering desperate questions however should give you half the amount of regular reputation points.

I think that this kind of division, is truly needed in order to keep people happier and limit question pollution without stiffling the efficient diffusion of knowledge.

New users should think before they ask but they should also have a credible way to show how engaged they are.

I believe that this kind of structure I propose will be hugely beneficial for the site (cause it will rekindle active interest) while also limiting noise pollution.

What the community thinks?

  • 3
    Wait! Isn't your self-destructed posts a kind of chat? – Jules Lamur Jan 12 '17 at 3:14
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    We already have self-destructing questions. The difference is that they leave a residue of sorrow and question bans. – Columbia says Reinstate Monica Jan 12 '17 at 3:15
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    This will invariably end up with the good answerers avoiding the 'temporary question' queue and then we will have an echo chamber of poor questions and answers. There are plenty of Q&A sites which will allow sub-par quality questions. There's nothing preventing people from asking on those sites when they're desperate and can't write a good quality question. You get what you pay for, though. SO is successful specifically because these kinds of questions are removed. – Rob Jan 12 '17 at 3:22
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    @Rob: It's not always beginners who ask for immediate help. – Makoto Jan 12 '17 at 3:32
  • @Makoto I couldn't find a better duplicate - however the answers to that question apply to this (and also to that question's dupe target). – Rob Jan 12 '17 at 3:33
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    If an answer is incredibly obvious, then you haven't done enough research or you haven't used a good tutorial. If the questions are low quality or being closed, then learn how to ask. High-quality questions about basic topics can exist, but most have already been asked before. – 4castle Jan 12 '17 at 5:42
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    Mentoring new programmers who don't know yet how to do research is a noble task. It's not what Stack Overflow was designed to do, though - that's what courses, classes at school and University, individual mentoring situations, internships, etc. are for. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jan 12 '17 at 9:37
  • @Kadriles no. a chat question has a very limited audience. – alexandros84 Jan 12 '17 at 18:41
  • @RobertColumbia do you know that you cannot delete your own question even if it has attracted negative votes, if it has upvoted answers? what kind of self-destruction is that? – alexandros84 Jan 12 '17 at 18:47
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    Oh, it certainly may. But this site doesn't want to. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jan 12 '17 at 18:55
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    I don't think you have really understood what this community is about. For the people who participate here it's never been about being the biggest, most dominant resource, the next Facebook or Myspace or Google. One important element is building a lasting library of programming questions and answers that future generations can reuse. That's the main reason for many people why they donate their time here - because when helping the asker you're helping future visitors with the same problem, too. Mentoring is by design much more custom-tailored, and less useful to people other than the mentee. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jan 12 '17 at 18:59
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    @alexandros "difficult for a beginner to grow"? In 2017, with millions of tutorials, books, and Q&A sites available online? I learned programming when there was no Internet. Only books and maybe a couple bulletin boards I was allowed to use an hour a day using a dial-up modem. That's "difficult to grow." – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jan 12 '17 at 19:04
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    I just dont get why this has to be a black or white issue Well, in practice, it's not quite black and white - we do a lot of mentoring and helping folks out. It happens all the time in comments, when an answer is not immediately obvious to someone. I guess the main argument against becoming "softer" by allowing "please help" type questions has been that it would lead to a giant swamp of questions that don't have value for future visitors, and wouldn't be very attractive to answer. After all, there's very little we can stop lazy people from creating new account after new account.... – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jan 12 '17 at 19:09
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    @alexandros84 you have absolutely NO proof that it is what happened. Not saying it's impossible it is what happened, but it's also possible someone saw your question and downvoted it organically. Remember that any post here is for the next user with the same issue to see and find. This is also why the proposal of questions that auto-delete is rejected so harshly. It goes against the mission of Stack : build a permanent repo of knowledge. – Patrice Jan 12 '17 at 20:05
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    @alexandros84 Again, I am not saying you are wrong. Just saying that you MIGHT be wrong, and the site is actually supposed to be LIKE that. Your questions are expected to be viewed and get voted on once in a while. It is possible someone went in and threw a downvote. It's also possible someone organically searched on Google, found your question, went "not helpful to me, I am downvoting". There is such a thing as the "meta effect" that tends to happen however where going on meta tends to cast a bigger spotlight on your content. – Patrice Jan 12 '17 at 20:16
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There isn't any substantial difference between a user's question, whether or not they need an answer now or can research an answer and get one later.

To be blunt, questions which warrant or ask for "immediate" attention indicate that their time is more valuable than ours; even though we may be knowledgeable, we have lives and other obligations outside of Stack Overflow, too.

There has been discussion on this matter in the past, but I want to address your specific request here.

a) permanent questions

and

b) "I am desperate for help questions" that will self destruct after 48 hours.

What is the fundamental difference between A and B if I see B at 47 hours 59 minutes and 00 seconds of its lifetime? Should I be deprived of the answer (if any exists) just because the OP needed to get something done on a deadline? What of the students who can take full advantage of a scheme like this to cover up any evidence of their plagiarism? Or worse, what of the actual "professionals" who make use of Stack Overflow as if it were an outsourcing platform to get somework done on the sly? Those thoughts alone dissuade me from a feature like this.

I suppose the root of your suggestion comes from this:

I have felt quite a lot of anxiety lately on whether I should ask a question or not. Sometimes this has been productive as it forced me to dig deeper before asking for help, but sometimes it gets plainly toxic.

Stack Overflow has a lot of answers on it, and a ton of questions. A handful of those questions are actually decent. The vast majority aren't. The community-at-large is vigilant in making sure that the questions which don't belong aren't kept around, and it's natural to have concerns that your question may fall into that category. Have a read at this question/answer; the answer is somewhat satirical but it still rings true; if you do your research, and you show that you've done your research, your question will be well-received.

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    "To be blunt, questions which warrant or ask for "immediate" attention indicate that their time is more valuable than ours; even though we may be knowledgeable, we have lives and other obligations outside of Stack Overflow, too." Nobody is forcing you to answer a question. – alexandros84 Jan 12 '17 at 18:29
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    @alexandros84: The only way that kind of system could ever possibly work is if users were otherwise obligated to pay attention to "urgent" questions. – Makoto Jan 12 '17 at 18:41
  • Honestly I think you are judging out of your own feelings. People at the beginning did not even believe that wikipedia would be successful... but it was. I do get what you say however. – alexandros84 Jan 12 '17 at 19:13
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    @alexandros84 and in that time thousands of sites were thought to be the next big thing and went bankrupt. If you think your idea is so revolutionary and the way forward; go build it. – Rob Jan 12 '17 at 21:37

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