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Over an a question about decoding HTML entities, I have an answer that recommends using a particular library and provides a simple code sample showing how to use it. The answer doesn't mention security, nor does it mention HTTP or web APIs at all. It's attracted this comment, which, if the author didn't have a history of better contributions, I would think had been generated by a spam bot:

Well definitively, handling thing on server side and providing safe data for the front end is definitively the first priority. Now if our server is providing data in a unsecured way (no https) from some rest/http API protecting it from front-end become necessary for a good level of security. Of course if everything is handled server-side (jsp/php/asp,...) with no ajax-call that include content in the page this isn't necessary.

Two attempts to get this comment deleted have now failed. I rarely fail to get the outcome I want with comment flags, and am confused by the declines in this case. The first flag read

this is irrelevant blathering and best deleted

which was admittedly not particularly detailed, though seems to me like a fair characterisation of the comment. The second read

not constructive; this comment is completely irrelevant to anything in this question or answer, and is so incoherent I can't even parse its grammar. Not sure why previous flag was declined

which was significantly more detailed. Yet that, too, was declined.

Three things are obviously wrong with this comment:

  • Nothing in it is in any way related to my answer
  • It's ungrammatical
  • It's incoherent:

    • Well definitively, handling thing on server side and providing safe data for the front end is definitively the first priority.

      Can anyone claim to know what this means? What is 'thing'? (And what is "safe data", for that matter?)

    • Now if our server is providing data in a unsecured way (no https) from some rest/http API protecting it from front-end become necessary for a good level of security.

      Again, can anyone claim to know what this means? The grammar is hopelessly ambiguous, allowing all of these completely different interpretations:

      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, then for a good level of security it becomes necessary to protect the server from attacks from the front-end.
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, then for a good level of security it becomes necessary to protect the data from attacks from the front-end.
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, then for a good level of security it becomes necessary to protect the API from attacks from the front-end.
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, it becomes necessary to act from the front end to protect the server
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, it becomes necessary to act from the front end to protect the data
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, it becomes necessary to act from the front end to protect the API
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API, it becomes necessary to act from the front end to protect the front end
      • If our server is providing data in an unsecured way (no HTTPS) from some REST/HTTP API that is protecting it from the front end, then a good level of security becomes necessary

      Given that not a single one of these 8 different interpretations is actually reasonable, I don't see how anyone can possibly claim to know what the commenter truly means.

    • Of course if everything is handled server-side (jsp/php/asp,...) with no ajax-call that include content in the page this isn't necessary.

      Again, I can't even figure out the pronouns here. What isn't necessary?

Can anyone see a reason for this comment to continue existing? I wasted minutes trying to parse it when it was first posted, and have now wasted minutes writing about it here; I just want it to stop polluting my answer!

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    That comment looks a bit like a suggested edit review audit. – Don't Panic Jan 9 '17 at 20:23
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    Rather than "why this comment should be deleted", I thought that the rule of thumb was "why should this comment be kept". We've been warned repeatedly that "comments are ephemeral" and "can be deleted at any time". Except, apparently, when you want them to be :). – Heretic Monkey Jan 9 '17 at 20:59
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    It is a strange comment indeed. Perhaps replying to its author with something to the effect of "Sorry, I don't follow" would have helped. – duplode Jan 9 '17 at 22:06
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    Looks like the commentor is saying that encoding HTML is useful if serving it up to the 'front end', but isn't needed if everything is handled server-side (jsp/php/asp,...)'. Not sure how it relates particularly to the answer, and not the question, though. Perhaps because you mentioned the fact that it works as a solution for node as well. – Rob Jan 9 '17 at 22:50
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    I didn't handle those flags, but my best guess is they were declined because you're using custom flags where standardized flags ("not constructive") would do just fine. Please use standard flags whenever possible; unnecessary custom flags make moderation much more difficult. – Ed Cottrell Jan 9 '17 at 23:04
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    @EdCottrell what? How? How can additional information/reasoning possibly make things more difficult for the moderator? That's not something that makes sense given any of the information I've ever read about the mod UI, and goes completely against common sense. – Mark Amery Jan 9 '17 at 23:06
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    @MarkAmery It puts it into a different list, for one thing, and requires more reading and analysis to digest what the flag is even about. When you have 2,000 flags to handle in a day, any unnecessary information becomes a serious drag. Think of the concept of "decision fatigue." And this is not new, although moderators have gotten a bit more aggressive recently in trying to keep the noise in the flag queue to a dull roar. That said, I'm speculating here; as I said, I didn't handle those flags. – Ed Cottrell Jan 10 '17 at 0:02
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    Wow, I am really impressed at anyone going to the trouble to write a meta post with this much detail about a comment! That's a level of passion I didn't think existed. If the comment is incoherent I just simply wouldn't worry about it, or perhaps just ask for a clarification from the comment's author. – Matt Coubrough Jan 10 '17 at 0:19
  • Unrelated to comment flagging, but if I had to guess, I think it has something to do with the accepted answer that you edited to add security note. The timestamp also follows: you edited the answer to look on either your answer, he commented on your answer. At best, the comment probably should had been posted on that answer instead. – Andrew T. Jan 10 '17 at 2:40
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    @Ed Cottrell: A standard "not constructive" flag would absolutely not fly in this case. – BoltClock Jan 10 '17 at 6:06
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    Why does that comment upset you so much? Why can't you simply make the determination that it is difficult to understand and probably irrelevant (as you have clearly done), and then move on with your life? – Cody Gray Jan 10 '17 at 9:14
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    @EdCottrell - "I didn't handle those flags, but my best guess is they were declined because you're using custom flags where standardized flags ("not constructive") would do just fine." ..... I would hope that you are not declining valid flags because you feel they entered through a channel that you personally feel was incorrect. – Travis J Jan 10 '17 at 19:54
  • @TravisJ on comments, no. The mod UI doesn't provide much (anything, really) in terms of opportunity to give feedback on comment flags. It's basically delete, edit, or dismiss (i.e., decline). On post flags, this has nothing to do with how I "personally feel." Failure to use standard flags is a built-in reason for declining flags. If a custom flag actually adds helpful context, great. If somebody raises a custom flag that adds no information beyond one of the standard flag reasons, though, we can and do decline those on a somewhat regular basis. Custom flags are more work for everyone. – Ed Cottrell Jan 10 '17 at 19:59
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    I can fully understand what every single word in that comment means. But in this context, and in this order? Nope. Not a clue... It's like Deepak Chopra has started leaving comments on Stack Overflow. – Martin Tournoij Jan 10 '17 at 20:23
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    @CodyGray seeing the enormous number of views and replies this question has received, I regret asking it and think you are entirely right. I opened it partly as an interesting case study (and something to refer back to in future as an example of the limitations of what users can achieve with comment flags), partly out of a compulsive desire to cull all time-wasting noise from popular posts (if 1 in 10 viewers spends a minute trying to decipher the comment, that's 2 man-days wasted per year), and partly just out of irritation. At this point, I clearly failed at the "avoiding time-wasting" part! – Mark Amery Jan 11 '17 at 10:10
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I was one of the two moderators who handled those flags, so I can at least explain my take on it. I'll be honest, comment flags that don't involve insults or other kinds of abuse are pretty much near the bottom of our list of priorities, so we don't spend a lot of time evaluating each one.

We get a lot of people who flag comments that they insist are wrong, and some people tend to flag any comment that disagrees with their post. As a result, I'm primed to decline any flag that attempts to try to get a comment deleted because someone's arguing that the content of a comment is technically wrong.

That's not exactly what you were flagging here, but I guess I didn't think this was as incoherent as you're arguing and thought you were more critical of its technical content. I thought I could kind of make out what they were trying to say, it's a comment from someone who has been a member for over a year and has a number of good contributions (so it's not bot-generated nonsense), and it doesn't insult or attack anyone. I guess I decided to give them the benefit of the doubt and not delete their comment.

I wouldn't take a declined comment flag as policy, or even an indication you were wrong, I just didn't choose to delete that comment. You make a decent case that the comment wasn't really adding anything, so maybe it should be deleted. I just didn't think so at the time.

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    Well, at least one other person seems to understand their comment judging by the upvote. Personally, I can't make any sense of the comment. – BoltClock Jan 10 '17 at 6:12
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    As usual when your name is attached to a post, I think this is a very rational and productive way of handling things. If there were a proliferation of comments below that post, then a cleanup would be warranted. But a single, non-offensive comment from a user in good standing that at least appears to be on topic does not seem worthy of deletion to me, not least of which because of the potential for abuse, as you mentioned. If NAA/VLQ flags are declined on half-arsed answers, we should certainly not delete comments (which are held to lower standards) simply because they're hard to understand. – Cody Gray Jan 10 '17 at 9:12
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    @BoltClock: I was the other mod to decline, and my thinking was exactly the same as Brad's. I too could decipher the comment. – Martijn Pieters Jan 11 '17 at 15:17
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    @CodyGray that logic doesn't seem right. We're frequently told that comments are ephemeral by design, while answers are not. The reason to decline VLQ flags on merely crappy answers but nuke similar comments with prejudice is that posts are allowed to exist by default and we need to overcome a hurdle of showing that they are garbage in order to delete them, while comments face a presumption that it would be better for them not to exist and need to have clear value to be allowed to stick around. – Mark Amery Jan 11 '17 at 21:30
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    On the other hand, answers are a lot more visible and therefore we stand to lose a lot more by having low-quality or not-useful answers hanging around. The same isn't true for comments, which are often hidden by default and easily ignored even when they are not. I would much rather have moderators spending their time and energy making decisions about things of consequence, rather than trivial matters like comments. @mark – Cody Gray Jan 12 '17 at 10:06
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    @CodyGray The key difference there is that bad answers don't crowd out good answers, or even waste the time of readers, because we have downvotes and bad answers get negative scores. Bad comments, though, can't be immediately recognised and ignored. I don't totally disagree with you - it is absurd that handling bad comments is a duty that falls only to diamond moderators. Like most of Meta, I wish we had comment downvotes so that I had some remedy available for dealing with bad comments that didn't waste mod time. – Mark Amery Jan 12 '17 at 10:15
  • "Bad comments, though, can't be immediately recognised and ignored." Going by the logic expressed in your previous comment, @mark, they certainly can, because all comments can simply be ignored, since we barely even deign them to exist. I'd prefer to treat comments more like chat, where we don't need to moderate them at all unless they contain something offensive or inappropriate. I'm also okay with comment cleanup in cases where the discussion has truly become obsolete, like where a comment thread is used to help someone figure out how to edit their question. Otherwise, leave 'em be. – Cody Gray Jan 12 '17 at 10:38
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    This is pretty bad Brad. A "declined" (read: not disputed) flag basicly says: "You should not have flagged that and we're considering taking action against your account (flagban) because you did" – Magisch Jan 12 '17 at 14:46
  • @Magisch I don't think that's the case; most users understand that they're going to get declined flags from time to time (and occasionally even wrongly declined ones, because our mods are made of meat and suffer from ordinary human frailty), and that this doesn't mean that they have committed some terrible evil in need of punishment. I've already had 27/451 post flags declined and 59/1605 comment flags declined; I wasn't at any point frightened that this flag was going to get me flagbanned. Plus I don't think "disputing" a comment flag is even possible. – Mark Amery Jan 12 '17 at 14:51
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    @Magisch - Declined comment flags do not result in flag bans, they don't work against you in any way. Helpful comment flags add to your helpful total (and even they didn't use to do this until relatively recently), but comment flags are outside of the normal flag mechanisms. Moderators only have three actions we can take on them: delete the comment (marking flag as helpful), edit the comment (marking flag as helpful), or leave the comment alone (declining the flag). I wouldn't worry so much about comment flags. – Brad Larson Jan 12 '17 at 15:17
  • @BradLarson May I also ask, why is a technically wrong comment not irrelevant? (if it were it should be deleted) ... or it is, it is just difficult for mods to evaluate and has low priority. – LGSon Mar 16 at 8:07
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If you feel you must take some sort of action, then the proper response in this case is to reply to their comment. Just say,

@user I'm not sure what you mean. The answer I'm providing isn't for server side code. Could you explain?

If they clarify, then maybe we've all learned something. If not, then anyone else trying to read it won't feel alone in their confusion.

I think what they're getting at is that manually encoding/decoding HTML smells of creating some kind of injection risk. (E.g., you could forget to encode a particular field.) So it's preferred to let templating engines do this on the server side for you (or to use a front end templating engine, instead of building up the HTML server side and sending it back); then you don't have to think about it. The mention of HTTPS just sounds confused. There's some risk of man-in-the-middle modifying content without it, but that's true regardless of whether or not you're encoding/decoding HTML.

Take that with the grain of salt it deserves, and please don't misinterpret it as saying that the comment is very good or useful in it's current form. However, even getting this far understanding it means that it doesn't warrant flagging. It's most likely some attempt to express a concern about the answer, whatever that concern may be, and that is an appropriate use of comments (or an attempted one). Flags are for blatantly inappropriate usage; they are a nuclear option.

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    "The proper response in this case is to reply to their comment." - I disagree. The comment is nonsense and there's no realistic chance of the author clarifying it into something worthwhile. Seeking clarification would just add noise, rather than removing it, and so would further reduce the visibility of any future critique of my post somebody wants to add that has actual value. – Mark Amery Jan 10 '17 at 10:41
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    @MarkAmery You said yourself that you can't figure out what the comment is trying to say, so how do you know that? You're not obligated to respond, but the only choices you should be considering are that or do nothing. I've updated the answer to clarify that. – jpmc26 Jan 10 '17 at 12:33
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    I agree with this answer. @MarkAmery "[There's] no realistic chance of the author clarifying it into something worthwhile." Even if that was the case, you still might get an useful reply -- for instance, "Oops, I posted it to the wrong answer!" Furthermore, 1-2 extra comments (there is no need for more if you don't feel like extending the conversation) are a quite small amount of noise. That feels like a bargain next to waiting twelve days for a resolution, while having to rais two custom flags and ask a Meta question in the process... – duplode Jan 10 '17 at 16:53
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    "the proper response in this case is to reply to their comment" I thought comments weren't for discussion. – Steven Byks Jan 10 '17 at 19:25
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    @StevenByks Comments are for seeking clarificaiton – Brendan Abel Jan 10 '17 at 19:45
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    @MarkAmery what's stopping you from deleting your comments after getting clarification? 1-2 comments are less noise than this whole meta post, answers and comments. – Amani Kilumanga Jan 11 '17 at 0:38
  • Can't speak for everyone's use of this site, but for a novice like myself, if I am trying to understand multiple answers and choose the best for my application, the popularity of an answer isn't always the deciding factor, and the OP's acceptation plays even less a role. For me, a coherent defense of the answer, in the answer or more especially in comments, leads me to believe that that answer is more likely to be more robust. Therefore, a nonsense comment, oddly enough, followed up as suggested in this answer, is more likely to garner my attention (and upvote) for the answer. – CWilson Jan 12 '17 at 14:33

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