-10

I recently discovered a simple solution to my own post and decided to post the answer. As soon as I accepted it someone voted it down, but I'm not sure why. I chose not to delete the down-voted answer, but instead to provide a stronger justification supported by additional information demonstrating its relevance to the scope of the question as it applies in my particular field.

That seemed the way to respect time and effort spent by those who sought clarification to my question and at the same time help others facing a similar choice with limited expertise. I noticed two votes to close the question so if anything it was my question, and not the answer, that should have been downvoted. Is there a way to know — rather than guess — why a particular answer or question is voted down by users so I can respond in a way that is most appropriate?

Response

Alexei, I accept your point that a question is not “about what you believe is written there”. It never is, even with a good question, and my question which you quoted certainly wasn’t. A "random joe" is right to a point even though in this case the problem was possibly the question, not the answer. But thank you for the alternative perspective.

Perhaps I should have edited my question further but rather than interfere with signals a community is sending about ideas under discussion I decided to clarify my answer and provided a justification for the practical solution I found. My answer will help someone and I will continue to stand by this even though it was not liked.

Thanks to responses here I recognise we shouldn’t read too much into voting in a forum which exists for people to share ideas and expertise. Voting is not an end in itself and we are dealing with signals limited to thumbs up or thumbs down.

At the same time, I will continue to up vote helpful answers from those who generously give their expertise and whose reputation (and possibly their livelihood) depends on up voted answers. I do not regard voting as an intellectual beauty contest, or something for the gratification of spectators or combatants at the colosseum but simply as a good way to say “thank you”, or alternatively, nothing at all.

And Hogan, I would take your point even further. As a teacher working with people who struggle with new concepts even though these might seem to be self-evident, it is always better to ask a probing question. This seems more helpful than a down vote.

  • 1
    Presumably you are talking about stackoverflow.com/questions/41438058/… - the answer does not in any way address question as asked - which is "why map in particular framework returns sequence instead of single item". You may want to actually read the question as asked - it is not about what you believe is written there (note that it is very hard to read your own questions/code as you have way too much context - try it as if random Joe wrote it) – Alexei Levenkov Jan 6 '17 at 7:37
  • 3
    Unfortunately, revenge down voting is a thing. Serial voting is caught and reversed by the system but there's no way to detect a one off tit-for-tat down vote. So you can either get angry every time you get down voted within minutes of posting a critical comment or you can just not leave down vote explanations (at least for anyone with > 124 rep.) People are also very rude in the comments when you do anything other than answer their question. – BSMP Jan 6 '17 at 18:33
  • 3
    @Greg -- Personally I always leave a comment when I down vote because I remember what it was like to get a down vote and not know why. Something to take with you into the future. – Hogan Jan 6 '17 at 21:05
  • Oh, here's a good reason not to comment on down votes that I was recently reminded of: It counts against the user more in the question ban algorithm. From Shog - In fact, any time someone else has put effort into evaluating your question, deleting it counts against you...Someone comments on your question to guide you toward improving it and you delete it? Bad. It can be kinder to say nothing rather than comment on a question that's unfixable. – BSMP Jan 6 '17 at 22:10
  • Thanks all, I've responded generally by editing the question – Greg Jan 7 '17 at 1:39
  • Related (cross-site): Encouraging people to explain downvotes – Peter Mortensen Jan 29 '17 at 14:57
12

Is there a way to know why an answer or question is voted down so forum correspondents can respond appropriately?

Yes. Hover your mouse over the downvote arrow. You'll see a tooltip that explains the reasons why it might have been downvoted.

Oh. You wanted something more precise than that? No, I'm sorry, there isn't any way. If no one left a comment explaining the problem(s), then you'll have to figure it out for yourself. Or decide that there aren't any problems and the downvote was unwarranted.

Please do not leave a comment of your own whining about downvotes asking for an explanation. If the people who downvote want(ed) to give an explanation, they would have done so. Often, it is not necessary because the person should be able to figure it out for themselves after reading the tooltip and engaging in some self-reflection. Other times, it's not worth it because it just gets you into an argument over the Internet, where no one wins. Besides, the people who actually downvoted are long gone by the time you get said comment posted, so they'll never see it.

I chose not to delete the down-voted answer but instead to provide a stronger justification supported by additional information demonstrating its relevance to the scope of the question as it applies in my particular field.

A perfectly reasonable strategy—good job! Common reasons for downvoting include technical incorrectness, inapplicability, lack of clarity, and poor formatting. Examining and improving any or all of these is always a good first reaction to a downvote. Lack of clarity is a very common problem, and something that people often underestimate since we're least qualified to judge the clarity of our own contributions. They make sense in our head when we re-read them, but of course they do, because we already understand what we were trying to say.

And yeah, don't feel like you have to delete something (question or answer) just because one or two people downvote it. If you think it's correct, and you think it's useful, and you can't see any way to further improve it, then leave it be—downvoters be damned. Sometimes peer pressure is useful; other times, it's a misleading signal. Not everyone with vote privileges is an expert.

In other words, don't obsess over votes. Use them as a signal, but don't try and read signal out of noise.

I noticed two votes to close the question so if anything it was my question, and not the answer, that should have been down voted.

Hmm yeah, this is a common problem. Questions that are off-topic, underspecified, or otherwise inappropriate often attract problematic answers. You're generally right that people should be directing their moderation privileges onto the question itself, since that's the source of the problem, but not everyone does it right. Also, some people feel that the answer is just as guilty as the question.

In this case, at least, it does seem like people were reacting to the question, since they had voted to close it. They may have just also reacted to the answer, which is not at all inappropriate.


Also, by the way, note that votes are sometimes a bit different here on Meta, in that they often indicate agreement or disagreement with the premise of your question. In this case, your question is being downvoted (A) because people vehemently defend the right to anonymous downvoting, and (B) because this discussion has been had repeatedly on Meta and you should have been able to find it if you had searched more carefully. Lack of research effort is another common reason to downvote questions. The good news is, votes don't affect your reputation on Meta (because there is no reputation on Meta).

  • 3
    What a great answer! Moreover, you won’t have to guess why I accepted it. I guess all I can do is to stand by my answer when I know it is right in the context of the problem even if my question could have been a bit clearer before it was first posted. There will be others who welcome what my answer offers. – Greg Jan 6 '17 at 6:19
  • 3
    "Please do not leave a comment... asking for an explanation" Why not? There's absolutely nothing that could go wrong by politely asking why a certain post (which is not necessarily yours) has downvotes. – dorukayhan Mar 11 '17 at 15:20
  • "Common reasons for downvoting include technical incorrectness, inapplicability, lack of clarity, and poor formatting. Examining and improving any or all of these is always a good first reaction to a downvote.": I feel it would be way more constructive to leave comments explaining the problems (with or without downvoting) than just downvote and let the poster figure out by him/herself what is wrong. – bli Jun 19 '17 at 11:32
  • @dorukayhan What can go wrong is that you leave unwanted clutter on the site, obscuring the content with meta-commentary. If someone wanted to provide that information, then they would. Since they didn't, they're not likely to ever check back and see your comment, and any future downvotes are evaluating the post on its own merit and would have no way of knowing why someone else downvoted the post. Therefore, your comment would go unanswered—at least in a meaningful way—making it the definition of noise. – Cody Gray Jun 19 '17 at 11:35

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .