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Stack Overflow is supposed to the comprehensive collection of programming wisdom, but as mentioned in a Meta discussion about the value of questions and answers (in much more detail than I care to repeat), the way we are instructed to format our questions tends to lead more to edge cases that are fairly user specific and may or may not be helpful for someone down the line. We recoil away from being a "discussion forum" or "help center" for some reason, and I think that that needs to change if Stack Overflow and especially its community will survive as the premier destination for programmers.

Any new question becomes a race of which multi-k rep user can close it as duplicate first because it's all about helping future users. But "future users" will all eventually become "present users", and at that point, the focus is still on future users, causing a paradox of sorts that is never able to resolve itself.

Therefore, I propose the following:

1) Allow questions to be marked as discussion threads. As a discussion thread, people can help the user find a solution either by trawling through duplicates or catering to the edge case. The final answer will be chosen or created from the sum of the thread by the author and appear to future users as a normal Q and A.

  • Pro: Newer users have a chance to earn reputation points and show their expertise

  • Pro: Users can get help for problems, and through that, we can separate the chaff from the wheat and construct something helpful for the next person with the problem.

2) Any question marked duplicate can be converted to a discussion thread by the author. Thus beginning the process outlined above.

  • Pro: if the duplicate presented didn't actually help because the multi-k rep user didn't take the time to figure out what was really going on, there is a recourse for the asker to get help from someone else.

Yes, this would change part of Stack Overflow into something of a help forum. THIS IS NOT AN INHERENTLY BAD THING. By doing this, we give newer users a chance to help others and prove their skill, askers a chance to get real help, and Stack Overflow the opportunity to get actual, well formatted, questions and answers for future visitors. We would not have to relax any of our standards; a poor question can still be deleted or even ignored. This will not create any more work for moderators; people like me would be providing the help and formatting the end result into something useful.

I would have appreciated this help as a new programmer, and I'd like to pass on what I know to the next generation. Stack Overflow is not very conducive to new knowledge any more. But we can change that.

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    Oh, kinda like what happens when you click "move discussion to chat" on long comment threads. Basically, you want a shortcut that gets a user in need of help in a chatroom with someone willing to help them. only, with chat, there'd be no rep involved (other than the minimum requirment) – Kevin B Jan 4 '17 at 23:05
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    "a help forum [...] IS NOT AN INHERENTLY BAD THING" - oh yes, yes it is. I don't know how long you've been active on the web, but every forum I've come across that allows "beginners questions" at one point degenerates into a "blind leading the blind" situation with users who are just there for the reputation/karma/tokens/post count, full of bad advice and devoid of knowledgeable people. – CodeCaster Jan 4 '17 at 23:10
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    Two observations: 1) Stack Overflow tries to do a few things, and do those well. It doesn't try to be a one-stop-solution for all things programming related. There are other resources for that already that do a better job anyway. 2) I strongly suspect that most experts are NOT interested in holding new programmers by the hand to teach them the same tired old concepts. If I would enjoy that I would have become a teacher :-) I strongly suspect that these "discussion threads" will become wastelands of non-experts trying to score rep, rather than experts giving useful information. – Martin Tournoij Jan 4 '17 at 23:32
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    I don't think we have a problem with people asking too few questions on Stack Overflow. We get 6k+ questions per day, the highest by at least one order of magnitude of any of the sites in the Stack Exchange network. – Heretic Monkey Jan 4 '17 at 23:37
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    @MikeMcCaughan and we don't even have enough hands to deal with a significant fraction of them. – Braiam Jan 4 '17 at 23:42
  • @MikeMcCaughan Depends on the month and the day: sostats.github.io/last30days Stack Overflow can get up to 10k questions per day. – Rizier123 Jan 4 '17 at 23:48
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    Apparently unlike Carpetsmoker, I have been a teacher, enjoy teaching, and would consider myself, in many ways, still a teacher. However, I would be very strongly opposed to such a feature being implemented on Stack Overflow. The Stack Overflow system does not handle it well. We are not positioned to be a tutorial site. It would be an exercise in masochism. I also don't see the paradox. Questions aren't closed as duplicates exclusively to help future users. The duplicate question has already been answered, so it's actually a faster way for the asker to get their answer. – Cody Gray Jan 5 '17 at 5:32
  • @CodyGray I think it was wrong choice of words - teacher is still teaches multiple people a time - sort of mini-SO :). I think "tutor" would be more appropriate for someone with significant interest to help single individual unwilling to learn at a time :) – Alexei Levenkov Jan 5 '17 at 7:01
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Any new question becomes a race of which multi-k rep user can close it as duplicate first, because it's all about helping future users. But "future users" will all eventually become "present users".

What difference does it make to present users? If your question has already been answered, use the existing answer that someone points you to. It's bad enough that high-rep users are forced to constantly close duplicate questions, we don't want to make them have to answer them too.

Pro: Newer users have a chance to earn rep and show their expertise

Googling for duplicates isn't exactly expertise, so I wouldn't consider that a "pro."

Pro: Users can get help for problems, and through that, we can separate the chaff from the wheat and construct something helpful for the next person with the problem.

That's already accomplished by closing questions as duplicates. If a question is mistakenly closed as a duplicate, there's already a reopen process in place.

I think this ties into the supposed decline of Stack Overflow. This gives the newer users something to do, rather than chasing them off with (rather aggressively enforced, yet arbitrary) rules or boring them to death with nothing to do

First, the rules aren't arbitrary. Every one of them exists for a reason. Just because you haven't taken the time to learn what those reasons are doesn't make the rules arbitrary. Second, newer users don't need something to do. They aren't bored. They come here to get help solving a problem. Once they find their answer then can get back to coding. I'd hardly call that boring.

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Allow questions to be marked as discussion threads

NEVER.

That conflicts with Stack Overflow's premise head-on. From the Tour (emphasis added):

This site is all about getting answers. It's not a discussion forum. There's no chit-chat.


Any question marked duplicate can be converted to a discussion thread by the author. Thus beginning the process outlined above.

Pro: if the duplicate presented didn't actually help because the multi-k rep user didn't take the time to figure out what was really going on, there is a recourse for the asker to get help from someone else.

You can ping that multi-k rep user if (s)he singlehandedly marked the question as duplicate. Simply leave a comment like this: @multi-kRepUsersUsernameWithWhitespaceRemoved I don't think this is a duplicate because [extremely thorough explanation of how is your question different].

In addition, five other multi-k rep users can remove the "duplicate" mark if they believe your question isn't a duplicate too!


By doing this, we give newer users a chance to prove their skill, askers a chance to get real help, and Stack Overflow the opportunity to get actual, well formatted, questions and answers for future visitors.

Well, we already give real help to those who are at least willing to follow our rules.


This gives the newer users something to do, rather than chasing them off with (rather aggressively enforced, yet arbitrary) rules or boring them to death with nothing to do.

Here's the thing: The problem isn't that our rules are harsh, it's that an annoyingly considerable part of new users who come here to ask questions don't even care about knowing those rules' existence, let alone following them. This group of "users" is big enough that one out of every few visits to SO lands on a question from them, thus making the Internet at large see all the rude complaints about how SO is drowned in a mountainous pile of "crap" harsh-looking-due-to-extreme-brevity comments begging the asker to make the question fit our rules, thus creating an appearance that SO is the worst online community ever.

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    It is rather like walking into a theatre and trying to start a discussion about plays. There are many smart people there, with lots of theatrical experience, so it seems like the perfect place to have such a discussion. But the moment you try to do it, people will start shushing you, giving you dirty looks, possibly hurling expletives in your direction, and eventually forcing you out the door. Why? Are all these people just unfriendly? No. They came to a theatre to enjoy a play, not to discuss it. Different forums have different purposes; it is incumbent upon guests to figure out what that is. – Cody Gray Jan 5 '17 at 5:35
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    Even better than pinging the user(s) who closed it is to edit the question to highlight how it is different from those other questions and explain how the answers to those questions did not help answer the current question. – Heretic Monkey Jan 5 '17 at 14:43
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    @CodyGray That's a really great analogy. – meagar Jan 5 '17 at 14:56
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    I'd emphasise that "the rules" aren't there to be stuck to; they're the letter that tries to put the spirit into words, namely that we want answerable questions. We don't want users to jump through arbitrarily decided hoops to prove their worthiness, no, we just want gosh darnit answerable questions. – deceze Jan 5 '17 at 21:06

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