-5

In reference to this question and this meta post. In said question, I initially posted this code:

if (condition1) {
    do_something();
    return;
}

if (condition2) {
    if (do_stuff())
        return;
}

if (condition3) {
    do_anotherthing();
    return;
}

// 10 more conditions

...with a description of do_stuff. Yeah, it's unclear. It's not too hard to figure out what's going on, but I could have made it better. I was told in the meta post to make it more compilable. So I did:

int conditions[10] = {0};

// set conditions based on user input, etc.

if (condition[0]) {
    do_something();
    return;
}

if (condition[1]) {
    if (do_stuff())
        return;
}

if (condition[2]) {
    do_anotherthing();
    return;
}

// rest of the conditions

...with an example do_stuff. I think this is pretty good. It is:

  • Minimal, only contains strictly relevant code.
  • Complete, compiles with little effort. Plus, I'm not asking for a bugfix so nobody needs to compile, I'm just asking about the C language itself.
  • Verifiable, it's an exact watered-down example of the problem.

But I was told that this is still not an MCVE, because it's not complete since it can't compilable. What do I have to do to get an MCVE? Must I write it like this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void)
{
    int conditions[10] = {0};
    int c = getchar();

    if (isnum(c))
        conditions[c - '0'] = 1;

    if (conditions[0]) {
        printf("Let's pretend there is a condition here.\n");
        return;
    }

    if (conditions[1]) {
        printf("blah blah yes or no? [y] ");

        if (getchar() == 'y') {
            conditions[2] = 1;
            return;
        }
    }

    if (conditions[2]) {
        printf("Let's say this actually does something.\n");
        return;
    }

    printf("Let's pretend stuff is actually being done here\n");
    return 0;
}

...while still somehow making it Minimal? What exactly should an MCVE be?

  • 2
    With all the contortions you've applied to your code in a vain attempt to create an "MCVE", you've inevitably obscured the entire point of the question. If you want someone to provide guidance on the best way to write the code in your specific case, then you need to post the code that you're actually using. – Cody Gray Jan 4 '17 at 18:33
  • @CodyGray what if the code I'm using is massive? – MD XF Jan 4 '17 at 18:35
  • 6
    @Redesign: I think this question here is irrelevant. Why? Because your problem isn't one that needs an MCVE. And your question was not closed because of a lack of an MCVE. It was closed as "unclear" because it's not clear what we're supposed to suggest you do with that code. – Nicol Bolas Jan 4 '17 at 18:39
13

The problem is that an MCVE is not defined by what it is, but rather what it should do: provide readers of the question with a clear example of your problem which leaves no room for guesswork.

That means you don't need to include #includes and int main(void) (unless your problem is with the #includes themselves, of course); everybody understands they need to be added in order to compile the code. What you should do, is making this like if (do_stuff()) more clear. I expect methods that do_stuff to return void. Abstraction is good, but if it's done too much, it only adds to the confusion.

I suspect that your problem is partly caused by asking the Stack Overflow public to improve a piece of working code. In general, those questions belong to Code Review, not here.

  • 11
    I disagree strongly - I think putting all the include directives and the main method in really is important... because it all makes it easier to reproduce the problem. For a true MCVE, I want to be able to copy, paste into a new file, compile and run (or compile and see the error messages). Why make each individual who wants to run the code go through the process of working out which include directives are required, and which bit of code is meant to be in main? – Jon Skeet Jan 4 '17 at 20:01
  • Well, let's agree to disagree agreeably. I rarely copy-paste the OP's code into my IDE, but run it 'in my head'. For me, boilerplate code is usually just noise. It might depend on the programming language, though. – Glorfindel Jan 4 '17 at 20:04
  • Well certainly in C# and Java it can usually be done in a pretty small number of lines for a console app, but getting the right namespaces etc can be time-consuming. I rarely use an IDE for this - but several times a day I'll copy/paste SO code into a text file and compile it from the command line. I often do the same when I'm answering, too. Aside from anything else, this prevents the problem where it was actually a part of the code that the OP thought was "unimportant" that caused the problem. When presented with a complete program, I'm more confident that's the code they've actually run. – Jon Skeet Jan 4 '17 at 20:07
  • 2
    The "for a console app" part is important as well, btw - too many users don't understand that just because they're writing a web app doesn't mean that their question is about web apps, or is best demonstrated in a web app. (Ditto GUIs.) Unless a question is specifically about a UI/web framework, a console app is much more useful. – Jon Skeet Jan 4 '17 at 20:08
  • 1
    Yeah, console apps are highly underrated by today's generation of programmers (I know this sounds really off, coming from somebody 33 years of age). Still, an IDE really helps with the imports/includes, if you need them at all. – Glorfindel Jan 4 '17 at 20:51
  • True - but in the time it takes to start an IDE and create a new project or open an existing one, I can easily have copied/pasted/compiled/run and started writing an answer... my main point is that this is unnecessary missing information. It doesn't take that much space to make the code complete, so why not do so? – Jon Skeet Jan 4 '17 at 21:05
  • Well, I have my IDE open already when I start to answer questions (from my colleagues or from SO). It takes me less time to hit the shortcuts for 'Manage all imports' and 'Run app' than to type the necessary commands to compile from the CLI, but YMMV. Don't take me wrong, if somebody includes boilerplate code I won't blame them; it's just that for most OPs the real problem lies elsewhere. I hope that's clear from my answer. – Glorfindel Jan 4 '17 at 21:23
  • Fascinating to see you and Jon both suggest that you have your IDE or a compiler open the majority of the time when answering questions. I'm quite the opposite. Most of the time, I analyze the code provided in the question looking for errors, and then write up my response directly in the answer box in my browser—including code. I often answer from an OS X notebook that doesn't have my Windows dev tools installed, unless it's a really complicated question that prompts me to switch boxes. Maybe it's the type of questions I answer. I tend to steer clear of "debug my code for me"-style questions. – Cody Gray Jan 5 '17 at 5:13
  • I don't see the merit in generating a complete console app—no matter how simple—to demonstrate something that could be even more simply demonstrated with only a few lines of the relevant code. Any competent programmer could assemble those into a full test case if they really wanted, but most of the time, it is not necessary, because that same competent programmer can look at those few lines of code and immediately see the problem (or understand what is being asked about). The less boilerplate code that needs to be included, the better, because it's less for everyone to wade through. – Cody Gray Jan 5 '17 at 5:16
  • No, that's not what I do (see my first comment), but I can understand Jon's perspective. It might very well depend on the type of question as you mention. – Glorfindel Jan 5 '17 at 8:27
-1

Imagine wanting to answer a question on Stack Overflow. Of course, you want to provide a good quality answer that is correct.

So you want to test your code to make sure it's correct before posting it. Programming is hard, even for experts, and it's spectacularly easy to make small mistakes.

But with the code in your question I can't do that. I need to figure out where to add that int main(void), figure out which #includes to add, somehow mock out the do_otherstuff() function, and make all sorts of changes just to get it running (assuming I won't make any mistakes or wrong assumptions leading to confusion or a wrong answer).

The MCVE is this question (that starts with #include <stdio.h>) is better, since it makes the job of anyone attempting to answer the question easier: I can copy/paste it in a text file, compile it, observe the problem you're describing, muck about with it until I solve your problem, and then post that as an answer.

And that is what I would consider the "gold standard" of an MCVE: code you can copy and paste the code into a file, and then run or compile it with no changes or additions what-so-ever* and get a clear demonstration of the problem described in the question.

Yes, the code should be minimal, but not so minimal that I need to write additional code to actually get it running. That's too minimal and not complete. It's needs to be minimal and complete.


* there are cases where removing excessive boilerplate code is warranted (e.g. Ruby on Rails questions), but this doesn't really apply to your question.

  • 4
    Then the only problems that could be covered by "gold standard" MCVEs are trivial nonsense that we don't really want anyway. You can't even start an OpenGL or Vulkan application without tons and tons of boilerplate. His question isn't even about the execution of such code, so why should he have to present one? – Nicol Bolas Jan 4 '17 at 19:20
  • 2
    @NicolBolas Yes, I agree that if there's a ton of boilerplate code involved you should probably omit that in most cases. That doesn't really apply to this specific question though, but I've clarified my answer to include that. Thanks. – Martin Tournoij Jan 4 '17 at 19:24
  • 1
    @NicolBolas: For a few questions, that's the case - but a huge number of questions don't require huge amounts of boiler plate, and can be demonstrated with console apps - even if the questioner actually wants to use the code in a GUI or a web app. IMO, it's incredibly useful to provide a genuinely complete example where possible. – Jon Skeet Jan 4 '17 at 20:03

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