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Why was this question deleted instead of migrated?

I recently was researching different antivirus software. (Please note, this is not the place to argue using antivirus software vs. preventative measures.)

I was having a hard time finding information online, yet I found a question on SO that addressed my problem:

Least intrusive antivirus software for development PC?

What is the least intrusive and most effective antivirus software for a Windows PC that is used for software development (lots of small files and lots of disk I/O)? The software should support running from the command line so that virus scan be included into the build process. Edit: I understand that prevention techniques work better than any antivirus, but the employer demands that commercial AV software be used in the development environment (looking a replacement for horrible Symantec Antivirus). Edit: I switched to the free Microsoft Security Essentials -- works great with negligible impact on system performance. No more the system freezing while new virus definitions are being installed. MSE also supports running from the command shell.

The question was closed as off topic since it was asking for a recommendation for something off-site. It hadn't been updated in a while, yet it did still have some useful ideas. It also had a link which pointed to a helpful comparative site, which solved my problem.

I updated the link to more recent data to make the answer more useful for current users.

When I came back the next day, the question was deleted. This question had gone unnoticed for a while, so I am assuming that my edit is what caused someone to notice it and decide to delete it.

Was the question correctly deleted?

  • The question is off topic for SO, yet seems to be a good candidate for https://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com/.
  • I would not consider this question too old to migrate since it was helpful just 2 days ago.
  • The question had multiple upvotes and a few good answers, so other users have found this question helpful as well.
  • The question addressed something that is not found easily online. It is computer related and I can see others from this community being interested in it in the future. Removing it completely doesn't allow anyone from ever benefiting from it in the future.

Why was my +2 not reversed?

On a side note, since I edited one of the answers, I received +2 after the edit was approved.

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Usually, the +2 is reversed as soon as a question is deleted. An example is shown below.

enter image description here

For some reason though, even though the question was removed, a -2 was never applied to my account.

Is there some delay in this process? The question was deleted yesterday, so I would assume automated scripts would have run already. Is there a bug with this question deletion that for some reason didn't trigger the rep reversal?

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    "I would not consider this question too old to migrate since it was helpful just 2 days ago." ... it's years old, and therefore too old to migrate. – Bart Jan 4 '17 at 16:39
  • @Bart I guess then I need to ask what categorizes something as too old to migrate. I would think that if a question is still currently helpful, it still can be worthy of migration. I would categorize things as too old if they are outdated and not helpful anymore. – Tot Zam Jan 4 '17 at 16:42
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    Anything older than 60 days won't be migrated. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/10249/… – Bart Jan 4 '17 at 16:43
  • Related FAQ on the Meta.SE: meta.stackexchange.com/q/10249/194720 – Heretic Monkey Jan 4 '17 at 16:44
  • @Bart Oh ok. I didn't know that rule. Seems like a loss to have something that just helped me deleted so others can't also gain from it, but I guess there is nothing I can do at this point. That just leaves my rep reversal question then. – Tot Zam Jan 4 '17 at 16:45
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    To add on to what Bart linked, even moderators can't migrate questions more than 60 days old. This was posted in 2008, and it was 2014 before someone brought it to the attention of a moderator, who rightly closed it as being off topic. As to why three community members voted to delete it, you'd have to ask them, but migration was not an option. – Brad Larson Jan 4 '17 at 16:46
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    I believe the rep gain is permanent since the post is older than 60 days old when it was deleted. – NathanOliver Jan 4 '17 at 16:48
  • I have a feeling @NathanOliver is right here. The system that determines whether reputation should be reversed may not reverse suggested edit reputation if the post the edit is on qualifies to keep it. As in, if it qualifies do nothing, else reverse all the votes on it. I don't think it makes sense to pull out specific votes to reverse regardless of the post. – animuson Jan 4 '17 at 16:53
  • @NathanOliver That makes sense, though the logic seems to be a bit off. I would think the reversal lock should look if the edit date is > 60 days, and not the question asked date. – Tot Zam Jan 4 '17 at 16:55
  • @TotZam Probably but I do not think they check individual actions for when they happened but just if the post is over X days old. – NathanOliver Jan 4 '17 at 16:57
  • Edits don't change the fundamental concern, which is the answers that the question has received. Migration migrates both the question and its answers. – Cody Gray Jan 4 '17 at 17:03
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Why was this question deleted instead of migrated?

Simply because 4 trusted community members voted to delete it, while no one got a moderator involved to migrate it.

When I came back the next day, the question was deleted. This question had gone unnoticed for a while, so I am assuming that my edit is what caused someone to notice it and decide to delete it.

Yes, that's a pretty good guess. It had been closed since March of 2014, so it was just living on borrowed time anyway. It had managed to fall off the radar and thereby escape deletion, but your edit bumped the question up and put it on someone's radar. Once they cast that first delete vote, it made it even easier for others to find it (in the "Recent Delete Votes" category under the Review tools), and the question received enough votes to be deleted.

Agreed on both counts. It is definitely off-topic for Stack Overflow, and maybe a good candidate for Software Recommendations. I can't say for sure, since I don't participate there and am not familiar with their guidelines for what makes a suitable question. Judging from your network profile, you don't either.

  • I would not consider this question too old to migrate since it was helpful just 2 days ago.

That's not how it works. The question itself was asked way back in 2008. That's the only criterion that matters.

Aside from that, community members cannot migrate a question to Software Recommendations. A moderator would be required for that, and no moderator ever got involved here. You'd have had to raise a custom moderator flag asking for the question to be migrated, and even then, they would have had to decline for the same reason—the age of the question. Not even moderators can migrate a question that is over 60 days old.

  • The question had multiple upvotes and a few good answers, so other users have found this question helpful as well.
  • The question addressed something that is not found easily online. It is computer related and I can see others from this community being interested in it in the future. Removing it completely doesn't allow anyone from ever benefiting from it in the future.

These two points are kind of true. I'm kind of conflicted here. Most of the answers that question received were garbage, but there were a few that were good. However, even most of the good ones relied primarily on links (or, if not outright links, brief references to specific tools), and if those links (or tools) were ever to become unavailable, all of the information would be irrelevant.

There might be an argument that we should keep the question around until such time as it became completely obsolete, and that that hadn't happened yet. I don't know; maybe that's true. I personally tend to err on the side of not deleting things that could potentially be useful, but many community members disagree with me on this.

Their argument is basically that these old, off-topic questions are like broken windows, and this argument is bolstered by the people who periodically come to Meta wondering why their recent question was closed as off-topic when they see other questions like it asked back in 2008 that were well-received.

If you think this question is useful, my advice would be to read the FAQ over at Software Recommendations to make sure that it would be on-topic there. Then, if it is, I would recommend that you re-ask the question over there. Chances are, this is what a moderator would have recommended to you if you had flagged the old question for migration. Let the new community answer the question on its own terms, without having to deal with a bunch of old answers that were never intended to comply with its guidelines and would just make more work for its members to clean up.

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