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Is there any minimum reputation requirements for people to edit the documentations? I have rejected at least 30 entries where new users submit spam content... And we can't waste time on rejecting those while there are other questions and documentations that could be reviewed.

Edit:

Worst part is after rejecting all the spam I ended up wasting my quota on documentation reviews : "Thank you for reviewing 30 changes; come back in 6 hours to continue reviewing."

closed as off-topic by pnuts, jhpratt, il_raffa, Nissa, peterh Nov 8 '18 at 1:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, jhpratt, il_raffa, Nissa, peterh
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I just posted a very similar question. This is a very weird thing (the doc changes). I wonder why there's no rep requirement for doc changes – ItamarG3 Dec 28 '16 at 17:17
  • Documentation is meant to be an open wiki collaboration. I doubt the team wants to restrict proposed changes to so much rep or more. More likely, they'll set up a filter to restrict those characters from being proposed, at least temporarily. IIRC, there is currently such a filter in place (or was recently) for Q&A posts. – Kendra Dec 28 '16 at 17:19
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    @Kendra all the users that suggested those documentation edits are 1 rep, and created today, with no questions, and no answers. I highly suspect that this is automated and made specifically for this. a rep limit of 2 would stop this. (Or a different requirement...) – ItamarG3 Dec 28 '16 at 17:23
  • @ItamarGreen Yes, and the rep limit would likely be removed once this is under control. This question seems to suggest a more long term rep limit. A more likely filter will be to block posts with Chinese characters, as is already done on the Q&A side. – Kendra Dec 28 '16 at 17:24
  • @Kendra Oh. I understand. – ItamarG3 Dec 28 '16 at 17:25
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    You are rigth! and strongly I believe that asking people who are willing to contribute to have at least 10 or 15 points isn't that high... And it will help us avoid wasting the limited number of reviews and time on automated spam. – Hannoun Yassir Dec 28 '16 at 17:33
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    I'm more inclined to require an answer (Possibly even restricted to the tag and required to be accepted!) At least then we know they're a real person whose knowledge has a little bit of trust. – gelliott181 Dec 28 '16 at 19:40
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    I think the benefits of having a low rep requirement outweigh the costs of losing strangers' insights to SO documentation. I think that it stands to reason that you should have either asked a question someone thought was useful or answered a question in a way someone thought was useful prior to changing the site documentation. Making a low but higher than default rep requirement (or a verified answer) for doc changes would be a Good Thing. – Greg Schmit Dec 29 '16 at 5:23
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    Sure, and let's add a rep requirement for answering questions while we're at it, too! ^_^ – Justin Time Dec 29 '16 at 20:34
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    But seriously, I believe the intent is that it's supposed to work the same way answering does. Just like the site allows 1-rep users to answer, because never having used the site before doesn't mean that they don't have enough knowledge to answer any questions, it allows 1-rep users to add documentation, because never having used the site before doesn't mean they don't know anything about any topics. This actually seems to be an XY problem, IMO: I believe the main issue here is that documentation spam isn't dealt with as well as Q&A spam, not specifically the lack of a rep limit. – Justin Time Dec 29 '16 at 20:37
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    @JustinTime I agree, however spam is a serious issue. Maybe a better option would be putting a CAPTCHA in place? (I am aware that there are CAPTCHA farms) but at leaset it is a first step. – Hannoun Yassir Dec 29 '16 at 21:10
  • @HannounYassir That looks like a pretty good solution. If an account doesn't have a high enough reputation, or posts a lot of "spammy"-looking content, then it can be prompted for a CAPTCHA before being allowed to post any content. Users that prove they aren't spammers would skip this step, and be allowed to post directly. – Justin Time Dec 30 '16 at 17:49

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