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Consider John makes a question, in example:

Q: What is a variable?

Alice posts an answer with several parts. Most correct, but it has a mistake. In example:

A: Such and such. List of types of variables with description and purpose. Volatile variables solve all synchronization troubles. Such and such.

How to deal with this?

I make a comment about volatile variables not solving all synchronization troubles but upon getting such comment Alice refuses to acknowledge the mistake. And there is no space in comments to elaborate.

I can't post an answer with an example of how volatile variables fail at some synchronization trouble since it would be off-topic to John's question.

I feel posting a new answer is not appropriate since, as far as my knowledge gets, Alice's answer is right and complete except for that mistake. So it would be just a rehash of an old answer with that bit corrected.

I might make a new self-answered question about volatile variables and synchronization. But people reading Alice's answer would still be getting wrong information with no pointer to the correct one.

UPDATE:

I'll clarify my words. I post a comment to Alice's answer stating that she is wrong about volatile values solving all synchronization troubles; and she replies with a comment stating she disagrees. Thus editing her answer is not a possibility. The answer is not fundamentally flawed, most of it is correct and useful. I know how to correct it, but nobody is allowed to edit the answer since Alice explicitly has refused it.

It is also worth mentioning that I might be wrong and maybe Alice is right. The "What is a variable?" question and the "Such and such. Volatiles solve synchronization troubles" answer are made up. In that example I am right. In other cases I might be wrong.

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  • Unless the original answer is yours you shouldn't change it so you shouldn't do the action in the last paragraph (or did you mean to comment under the answer rather than edit the answer?). Is either the original question or the original answer yours? – Robert Longson Dec 26 '16 at 9:12
  • I am A. The original answer is by B and the original question by C. I meant posting a comment to B's answer about the part he got wrong with a link in my comment to my selfanswered question. – Anonymous Coward Dec 26 '16 at 10:05
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    Well, if the new question can stand on it's own(and fit within the guidelines), then I'd say go for it, but I wouldn't link to the other ("wrong") answer, nor call out on it in either of the new answer or question. – Epodax Dec 26 '16 at 11:32
  • @Epodax Would it be ok to leave the quoted text, attribute it to the author and omit link to original answer? Or should I just word the question in a way which leaves no trace as to what or who originated it? – Anonymous Coward Dec 26 '16 at 12:09
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    It requires skill in order to do it in a way that will be well received by the community. The example you have of how the new question would be framed is bad. It is a "yes/no" question, which is not particularly useful. Q: "Can I use volatile for... " A: "No." Okaaaaaay, now what? Even a "no, because...." leaves the problem intact. As a matter of custom on this site we take "yes/no" questions as questions asking how, which are useful. A: "No, but you can do A, B, C, D." The question you show turns into a question about how to solve synchronization problems without volatile. Too broad. – Louis Dec 26 '16 at 12:42
  • @Louis I am going to follow your advice here in this very meta question. – Anonymous Coward Dec 26 '16 at 14:02
  • In your example, at first, it should be closed because it's too broad. Secondly, it's always a good idea to explain further concerns that we may be aware of and, lastly, if the answer it's very off topic, we should leave a comment stating so to the answer owner so s/he have the chance to clarify. – Sgdva Dec 26 '16 at 14:36
  • Rather than try to convince them that the statement they're making is wrong, you can simply argue that it's off topic, and should be omitted entirely from the answer. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 20:44
  • If this ends up in a rollback-war, you should write your own answer. You don't provide a link to the posting you mean (might help to add it), but this looks like a C or C++ problem. And I'm fully with you, volatile does not solve synchronisation issues in general. (it works on many embedded systems, though). That's why atomics have been added to both languages (and with mostly identical features). – too honest for this site Dec 28 '16 at 21:13
  • The question about variables and the mistake about volatiles is a made up example. It's the situation of "Complete answer which is 99% percent correct answer with 1% mistake but author disagrees about it being a mistake" that I don't know how to deal with. – Anonymous Coward Dec 28 '16 at 22:25
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UPDATE:

If your proposed changes have already been rejected by the OP, either by a rejected edits or a response in comments, I'd recommend following the advice of Can I contest a rejected edit?:

You can't contest an edit, although you can start a discussion on meta.

But you can re-suggest it if you really think it is useful.

But keep in mind that an edit must be substantial without changing the meaning of the post.

In particular, it could be that your edit is actually wrong or changes too much.

You can also choose to vote accordingly, if you so desire. You could also post a better answer. Every answer must be an answer though, so you don't want to post an answer that just corrects another answer.


For minor issues that you know how to correct, and that don't significantly change the intent of the answer, you should just go ahead and edit the answer to correct the mistake.

Be sure to include a detailed edit summary to clarify why exactly you are editing the answer, so that reviewers will understand the edit.

For reference, a very similar question is on Meta Stack Exchange. Here's an excerpt from the accepted answer:

When an answer is wrong, there are three tools you can use. Each tool apply to different circumstances.

  • If the answer is fundamentally flawed, downvote it. Preferably leave a comment to explain both to the poster and to people who will read the answer what is wrong with it.
  • If there is a minor flaw in the answer, and you know how to correct this flaw, then edit it. Editing is a core feature of Stack Exchange:

    Editing is important for keeping questions and answers clear, relevant, and up-to-date. (…)

    When should I edit posts?

    Any time you see a post that needs improvement and are inclined to suggest an edit, you are welcome to do so. (…)

    Common reasons for edits include: (…)

    • To correct minor mistakes or add updates as the post ages
  • If there is a minor flaw in the answer, and you do not know how to correct it, then leave a comment explaining what you don't understand or what trouble you ran into when trying out the solution in the answer.

    Comments are temporary "Post-It" notes left on a question or answer. (…)

    You should submit a comment if you want to:

    • Request clarification from the author;
    • Leave constructive criticism that guides the author in improving the post; (…)

    Comments are not recommended for any of the following:

    • Suggesting corrections that don't fundamentally change the meaning of the post; instead, make or suggest an edit

To summarize: comments are for unresolved issues only. If you are capable of resolving the issue, as was the case here, edit the post.

To be clear here, the first step is to try to correct the issue if you can, hopefully with a great edit that the OP and/or reviewers would not disagree with. If the OP or reviewers reject the edit, then it is time to consider other options.

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    This is not a mistake, it is a disagreement over content, in which the post author wrote exactly what they intended, and specifically indicated that they don't agree with the proposed change. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 20:43
  • @Servy OP called it a "mistake" repeatedly in their question than I am answering. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 20:44
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    The OP specifically said that the author feels the content is correct, and refuses to acknowledge that the change is in fact a mistake. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 20:46
  • @Servy That would be a different question: "What to do when my correction is rejected?" – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 20:46
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    They've specifically indicated that they feel the change is incorrect, and that their answer is correct. They have made their intentions explicit. You can't say that the change doesn't change their intent when they have said that the change violates their intent. How you feel a change could possibly not violate their intent when they have told you that the change violates their intent is beyond me. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 21:18
  • @Servy Maybe you've read the answer eluded to in the question, or have some more information that was not shared, but "refuses to acknowledge" isn't an explicit rejection of a proposed change. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 21:19
  • How is it not? The change you're proposing is very explicitly proposing changing the author's intended answer. It's very clear that they didn't intend the answer to be what the OP wants to change it to. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 21:24
  • @Servy Because "refuses to acknowledge" could just as well mean complete indifference. Again, we're not talking about a total rewrite here. We're talking about potentially correcting a minor error in details, which is presumably not their real intent. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 21:30
  • It means that the author doesn't want to make the change, which means it's their intention that the answer say what it says, not what the proposed change is. This isn't just some trivial phrasing change, it's a significant change to the underlying concepts the answer is explaining, and changing them to state something radically different from what the author stated. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 21:34
  • @Servy Not wanting to make the change doesn't mean they don't agree with the change, or wouldn't accept it if it was proposed. It may also be they didn't fully understand in the comments what was wrong, and a good edit might really show them their mistake. Also, the example questions was "What is a variable?" with an answer listing different variables, one of which is allegedly not-entirely-accurate. If I understand the nature of this change correctly, I do not agree that this is a radical change. Maybe if the question were "What are volatile variables?" and the answer was solely about that. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 21:40
  • Not wanting to make the change doesn't mean they don't agree with the change That's...exactly what it means. If they agreed with the change then why would they not want to make the change? Yes, the change is a radical change, in that it's changing the underlying content of the answer, and on top of that, in ways that the author specifically disagrees with. The answer contains an explanation of a concept that someone else disagrees with entirely and feels is entirely wrong, and would completely rewrite. That it's not the entirety of the answer doesn't make such a change an acceptable edit. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 21:45
  • @Servy "The answer contains an explanation of a concept that someone else disagrees with entirely and feels is entirely wrong, and would completely rewrite." The OP said they only had a partial problem with volatile variables description on the list and that the rest of the answer was good. Overall, that doesn't sound radical to me, or like it would fundamentally change the answer in any way. "That's...exactly what it means." Nah, I know I have legacy code in my repos that I 100% agree could be better, and would accept pull requests on. I don't have the time/desire to fix it myself though. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 21:53
  • If you don't consider re-writing a portion of the answer because the author just didn't understand the concept at all, wrong something completely wrong, and someone else wants it to say something entirely different then your definition of "radical" change is simply very out of line with SE's standards of editing. It's simply not appropriate to rewrite a section of someone's answer because they think it's right and you think it's completely wrong. You're free to use a different approach to your code repositories, but that doesn't mean it's appropriate in SE posts. – Servy Dec 28 '16 at 22:16
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    I'll clarify my words. I post a comment to Alice's answer stating that she is wrong about volatile values solving all synchronization troubles; and she replies with a comment stating she disagrees. Thus editing her answer is not a possibility. Thus none of the three options by Alexander work. The answer is not fundamentally flawed, most of it is correct and useful. I know how to correct it, but nobody is allowed to edit the answer since Alice explicitly has refused it. – Anonymous Coward Dec 28 '16 at 22:22
  • @Servy We edit wrong stuff all the time for one reason or another. Sometimes we even do it at the protest of the OP. Remember we don't put much value in answer "ownership" here. – Alexander O'Mara Dec 28 '16 at 22:24

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