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I've seen a few suggested edits that have changes basically amounting to "… a SQL query …" → "… an SQL query …", and vice versa.

I will typically approve these if the rest of the edit is substantial enough to warrant it, and will reject it otherwise as not improving the post. Do we agree that's the way to go?

If so, I'd like to be able to point to this question when rejecting such suggested edits, in order to improve behaviour around the issues in the future, with the ultimate goal of reducing noise in the suggested edit queue. "No improvement whatsoever" doesn't really cut it for me, because those people who have very strong opinions may well just think "what a bunch of ignoramuses" and move on to the next one.

And yeah, I'm aware this is an extremely minor issue; does that really matter? It seems to me to be one more (small) way we can be a less hostile community—respect authors' right to use whichever pronunciation they're most comfortable with.

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    As far as I can see, it is clear-cut: if that is all the suggested edit does, reject as too minor/"no improvement whatsoever". – duplode Dec 15 '16 at 22:22
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    Those should be rejected as minor. I think this is like the British/American English debate: we follow OP's style. Both "a" and "an" are acceptable: english.stackexchange.com/questions/1016 – approxiblue Dec 15 '16 at 22:23
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    On Wikipedia, the lead sentence in the SQL article indicates that both pronunciations are acceptable. Personally, I believe that the choice of "a" or "an" made by the original author should stand (assuming consistent use throughout the post). – DavidRR Dec 16 '16 at 13:24
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    Obviously the solution is to rewrite all such sentences to use a definite article, rather than an indefinite article! English is nothing if not flexible. – Cody Gray Dec 16 '16 at 15:08
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    @CodyGray You say, do not, hmm? – Braiam Dec 16 '16 at 18:21
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    And here i was thinking i'm really going to see a serious topic and a debate on whether SQL should be changed to SeQueL or vice-versa so i can chime in with my wat? ... :( – Shark Dec 16 '16 at 18:24
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    Just re-word the sentence to read "the SQL query …" no matter what tense or context it is in and then it would produce a substantial (more than one word) edit :) – MonkeyZeus Dec 16 '16 at 18:48
  • I'm with you and your recommendation, its a perfectly pragmatic approach to reject edits that just change a -> an or vice versa. It brings to mind the "Ly-nux" vs "Lee-nux" debates of old, and I think people agreed to go with both, despite Linus himself giving a preferred pronunciation. – Phylyp Dec 16 '16 at 18:50
  • Never figured I would be flogged so hard for such a light-hearted comment on Meta but here we are I guess... – MonkeyZeus Dec 16 '16 at 18:57
  • @MonkeyZeus Ha I never thought this question would get more than a few down votes and a terse answer. I didn't see Codecaster's comment and didn't mean to gang up on you, so sorry about that :) – Jeff Dec 16 '16 at 19:01
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    @Jeff Lol, no sweat man. I was just hoping to poke fun at a solution which would actually work but is even more futile than the edits which your question is pointing out. Maybe CodeCaster simply didn't see the smiley face at the end of my suggestion :) – MonkeyZeus Dec 16 '16 at 19:03
  • @MonkeyZeus true - I have to admit that I did :/ – Jeff Dec 16 '16 at 19:04
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    @MonkeyZeus - you are evil and should be flogged more! :D – Hogan Dec 16 '16 at 19:50
  • Perhaps we should defer to English Language & Usage SE, as I believe "an SQL" is actually less correct than "a SQL". Having said that, we tolerate a large amount of heavily broken English to be more inclusive, so such a fine point of English is a very trivial distinction. – Hack-R Dec 16 '16 at 20:23
  • Wikipedia on SQL has pronunciations as /ˈɛs kjuː ˈɛl/ or /ˈsiːkwəl/. So both an SQL and a SQL are valid depending on how you would pronounce SQL. Personally I think /ˈsiːkwəl/ sounds better and I always write a SQL query. The wikipedia has it written as an SQL ... in the article. – TT. Dec 16 '16 at 20:40
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And yeah, I'm aware this is an extremely minor issue; does that really matter?

I think that's really the point. Changing "a SQL" to "an SQL" or vice-versa is an extremely minor issue, and it's completely debatable which is even "correct." That change alone is not enough of an improvement to justify making several other people approve an edit. I agree that rejecting those edits is the way to go.

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    Thanks :) this gives me something to point at with a "causes harm" if I feel that I need to give more precise feedback to the aspiring editor. – Jeff Dec 15 '16 at 23:00
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    @Jeff it's similar to the notion of changing UK spelling to US or vice versa. If that's all an edit does, or not much more, reject. If it does that in the midst of an otherwise great or helpful edit, well, maybe click "Improve Edit" and change the spelling back. You can always do this for your scenario, too. This will give you the opportunity to simultaneously revert the "a" -> "an" change while approving the rest of the edit at the same time. The original editor will probably never notice. – TylerH Dec 16 '16 at 17:11
  • @TylerH good point- I will do that from now on – Jeff Dec 16 '16 at 18:23
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Personally, I would do the same. If this is the only change, I would reject it as "no improvement whatsoever". If it's one of many bigger fixes, I would accept it. Basically, this change alone wouldn't affect how I would evaluate the edit.

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I would not only agree (that changing 'a' to 'an' is 'no improvement whatsoever'), but assuming I had the time, I would override them (selecting 'improve edit' and/or 'reject and edit' depending on the rest of the edit) and revert the a/an to how it was.

Changing the article when there is a disagreement over what is right is flat-out inappropriate. (It would be different if you saw "an bus" and changed it to "A bus", that is clear; but "a SQL" vs "an SQL" is a matter of style, not a matter of correctness.) Let the author determine style.

  • I'd argue that it is a matter of correctness. In English (all versions), "an" is only used when the first letter of the following word is a vowel. "S" is a consonant, so "a SQL" is the only correct version. – Tim Dec 18 '16 at 19:52
  • @Tim If you regard the initialism as an acronym that is correct. Otherwise the S is pronounced as ess: en.oxforddictionaries.com/spelling/initialisms. – Andrew Morton Dec 18 '16 at 20:10
  • @AndrewMorton - In professional circles it is always pronounced "sequel", and never "ess-que-ell". Thus "a" is appropriate. – Tim Dec 18 '16 at 20:51
  • Both pronunciations are appropriate and thus no edit should be made. Regardless of your opinion on the matter. I work in the field and plenty of people say both. – Joe Dec 18 '16 at 20:56
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    @Tim TIL that I'm not a professional, since I sometimes pronounce it S.Q.L. – Jeff Dec 19 '16 at 20:00
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I will typically approve these if the rest of the edit is substantial enough to warrant it, and will reject it otherwise as not improving the post. Do we agree that's the way to go?

No, do not let that go through, not even if the rest of the edit is substantial enough to warrant it. That would likely lead to the edits being rolled back by the original authors of the posts, so just wastes people's time.

If the rest of the edit is good enough, do feel free to revert the "a"/"an" changes and apply the rest, but rejecting them outright and recommending the editors to resubmit without those changes seems reasonable to me too.

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respect authors' right to use whichever pronunciation they're most comfortable with.

What about respecting the right to get the answer? What about the right for the question to hang around long enough to be spotted by someone who can answer? The right of other questioners not to have their question bumped down by such pointless edits only because someone wants to snatch some cheap reputation points?

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    "The right not to be bumped down by such pointless edits only because someone wants to snatch some cheap reputation points?" That's exactly what the OP said, so I'm not sure why you phrased this like you disagree. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 16 '16 at 18:16
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    Yeah I was talking about the post's author not the editor. I believe we're in agreement. – Jeff Dec 16 '16 at 18:25
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    @ThisSuitIsBlackNot then you don't understand either the OP or this answer. To me the right of expression is too negligible an issue, already violated by the SO rules anyway. You don't own the content you posted, so it will be edited, this way or another. I don't care for the OP's freedom of expression. I do care for their right to get the answer. But it seems there are no people here who actually realize how SO works - and so get my idea. First you need to understand that edited question bumps UP. Pushing new questions DOWN. – Your Common Sense Dec 16 '16 at 18:25
  • Oh I see. Yeah sure, that's a fair point, but those are compromises for a reason. This kind of change seems like all it's doing is being disrespectful without improvement to their post or to the community. Maybe "right" was a poor choice of word – Jeff Dec 16 '16 at 18:28
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    @YourCommonSense The OP said he rejects edits that just change "a SQL" to "an SQL" because they're too trivial. You're saying the exact same thing. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 16 '16 at 18:37
  • In what sense does a pointless edit bump the question down? – Martin Smith Dec 16 '16 at 18:53
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    @MartinSmith It doesn't bump the edited question down, it bumps other questions down. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 16 '16 at 18:54

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