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Correct me if I'm wrong, but an up-vote means someone found a question useful, right?

So if a question receives 4 or 5 up-votes, why on Earth would it be closed as off-topic? Especially if it's a perfectly valid question which falls within the Stack Overflow guidelines?

I've noticed this many times where people don't bother to read the entire question, or just have poor reading skills and are allowed to close questions and retard the gains made by others.

I just had a perfectly valid question with +9 rep points put on hold using the vague excuse of "off-topic."

Here's the definition of "off-topic" according to the Help Center:

This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined by the community.

What scope is that? If "the community" decides they want all of the questions to end with "Praise Kek!" or "I love Hello Kitty!" would you succumb to that nonsense because "the community" demands it?

It continues…

What's on- and off-topic is not always intuitive...

And yet, this variably unintuitive "community" has the power to shut down perfectly valid questions because they didn't like the way they were worded.

Maybe some of us aren't the best at writing questions, but that doesn't mean they're bad questions and deserved to be closed.

I've seen plenty of examples where people pounce on the OP because their English wasn't very good, or they just wrote in a clumsy manner. They were derided and their question closed.

All they were doing was asking for help.

Asking for help is what Stack Overflow is all about.

Isn't it?

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    The notice says a lot more than just that sentence, including "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Heretic Monkey Dec 14 '16 at 16:05
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    5 people found it off topic, including a sitting community-elected moderator. 5 other people could just as easily disagree and reopen it. Give them a reason to disagree. – user400654 Dec 14 '16 at 16:06
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    The first thing i see wrong with your question is you don't state what is wrong or not working (other than "the code", which isn't good nuf) – user400654 Dec 14 '16 at 16:07
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    "Asking for help is what SO is all about.". Not really. SO is about helping yourself - hopefully based on existing questions and answers so you don't have to go through the lengthy process of asking a really good on-topic question and waiting for answers. In that process of helping yourself (and others) asking a new question might need to happen though, sure. – Gimby Dec 14 '16 at 16:10
  • @KevinB So the fact that I spent over an hour researching VBScript functions and re-writing the function in PHP myself shows no effort in researching how to do it? – timgavin Dec 14 '16 at 16:13
  • @timgavin we aren't sitting next to you watching you work. Unless you show effort we have no evidence of it. – user400654 Dec 14 '16 at 16:14
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    @timgavin That's exactly right. Spending an hour doing research is completely different than showing research effort. Doing it, or even stating that you did it, is completely different than demonstrating that you've done it. By simply showing your code, including no description of the problem, no indication of what you found when searching for information on that problem or how to fix it, the things that you tried to do to solve that problem, and the result of those (presumably failed) attempts, you have done nothing to demonstrate your research. – Servy Dec 14 '16 at 16:16
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    @timgavin Why should i assume anything else? you're using + for string concatenation... you didn't tell us what you gave the function or what it output... didn't mention any errors... (note that if you fixed the latter two points your question would no longer be off topic.) – user400654 Dec 14 '16 at 16:16
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    Regarding your last two sentences: No. Stack Overflow's definition of an on-topic question isn't: "Does the question ask for help?" – meagar Dec 14 '16 at 16:21
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    The question never once had a score higher than 0. Reading comprehension problem, yeah, check. Sympathy voting never once produced a "highly upvoted question", the [php] tag community needs to get its act together. – Hans Passant Dec 14 '16 at 17:50
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    Actually @timgavin it wasn't a mod. See Who are the moderators?. – Lankymart Dec 14 '16 at 17:57
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    @timgavin I'm sorry you feel that way. You opened yourself to critique, the best thing you can do is let it slide take onboard @Cody's answer and learn from it in future. The votes just reflect the communities agreement with the ideal, so in this case they don't believe the question was "perfectly valid" and the answer to that is by taking on-board cody's answer. – Lankymart Dec 14 '16 at 18:04
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    @timgavin I doubt very much it was intentional, your initial title "Closed Question" isn't very descriptive that was just their way of trying to improve it (it's a wiki after all!). If you don't agree with the title change it but try to keep it descriptive. – Lankymart Dec 14 '16 at 18:12
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    @Lankymart I appreciate your effort. – timgavin Dec 14 '16 at 18:16
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    @timgavin the solution to an edit you don't think is appropriate is to rollback to your version :). But yeah it does seem that the verbiage wasn't yours and you got some frack from it.... which isn't ideal. However the downvotes here do not cost rep, so your rep isn't trashed by this Q&A pair (well... maybe the meta effect that likely followed on the linked post). – Patrice Dec 14 '16 at 18:31
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but an up-vote means someone found a question useful, right?

Yes, that is one possible reason for an upvote. There are others, and ultimately, people are free to vote for whatever reason they want.

So if a question receives 4 or 5 up-votes, why on Earth would it be closed as off-topic?

Because usefulness and topicality are orthogonal concepts. Lots of questions are interesting to people, and therefore accumulate upvotes, but are still off-topic. We cannot do all things. A limited scope is one of the critical elements to Stack Overflow's success.

Especially if it's a perfectly valid question which falls within the SO guidelines?

Well, you've got me there! Obviously a question that meets those criteria should not be closed as off-topic! (Is this a trick question?)

I've noticed this many times where people don't bother to read the entire question, or just have poor reading skills and are allowed to close questions and retard the gains made by others.

Sigh, no. I'm so tired of seeing this accusation made. I would put my reading and comprehension skills up against literally anyone else on this web site, but that doesn't mean I close any fewer questions. In fact, I probably vote to close more of them. I have a high standard for quality; it's another one of the things that makes this site work.

Do try to avoid adopting an entitlement complex, where you think that we somehow "owe" you a place to ask your question or an answer. Insulting the competence of the people who thought your question was unclear or off-topic is not a good way to get ahead, especially absent a more persuasive argument than "well, I thought it was a valid question!" Of course you did. You asked it. You are literally the least qualified person to judge whether the question is clear or useful. Please understand that I don't say this as a slight against you, or your question in particular. It would be true of me or anyone else. The questions we have make sense in our own minds, but don't necessarily make sense once we get them down on paper/screen.

I just had a perfectly valid question with +9 rep points put on hold using the vague excuse of "off-topic."

It is only vague because that's the short description. Notice that it does go on to explain specifically what the problem is, right there in the big yellow close box:

"Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example."

Honestly, from where I sit, that looks like a pretty serious problem with your question. You present two snippets of code and say that the second is "not giving the expected results". Notice that you do not say what the expected results are, nor do you give any test cases/data. "Does not work" is not a sufficient description of a problem for "fix my code"-style questions.

Here's the definition of "off-topic" according to the help center.

This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined by the community.

Yeah…I'll grant you that it makes absolutely no sense for the "insufficient information"/"lacks an MCVE" close reason to have been placed under the general "off topic" heading. You're not the first person to have been confused by this, but so far, all attempts to get it changed have been met with derision by the team that runs this web site.

See:

What scope is that? If "the community" decides they want all of the questions to end with "Praise Kek!" or "I love Hello Kitty!" would you succumb to that nonsense because "the community" demands it?

To be fair, you, me, and all of us are part of "the community". You make it sound like it's some kind of tyrant, but that's not how it works.

Maybe some of us aren't the best at writing questions, but that doesn't mean they're bad questions and deserved to be closed.

Of course not (that's what editing is for). The critical issues are:

  1. Does the question contain sufficient information—in its current form—to be answerable?
  2. Would an answer be reasonably scoped?
  3. Is the question on-topic?

(Again, some of the things we put under the "off-topic" category really shouldn't go under that category. By "on-topic" I mean, "is it programming-related?")

If the question does not meet these criteria, it needs to be closed—at least until such time as it can be modified to meet the criteria.

We specifically tell people how their question runs afoul of the guidelines in the big yellow box so that they can improve their question.

Some people take this advice, improve their question, and get it reopened and answered. Other people throw a fit about their question being closed, and stall out there.

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    This cannot be argued, well done. – Antoine Pelletier Dec 14 '16 at 16:34
  • No entitlement here, just confusion and frustration. All of the answers to my "rant" have been the most helpful thing I've received on this site. Thank you for your excellent post. :) – timgavin Dec 14 '16 at 16:34
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    However, it really wasn't clear to me WHY the question was put on hold. It most certainly is now! :) – timgavin Dec 14 '16 at 16:37
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    @timgavin but... it was clearly explained on the banner..... your off-topic was explaining just that.... even linking into help center articles..... The information was there, at your fingertips... Also.. considering all the feedback you got on your question... now may be the perfect time to edit it into shape and see it get reopened, for the happy ending that question may deserve ;). – Patrice Dec 14 '16 at 16:52
  • "You make it sound like it's some kind of tyrant" some would say "the tyranny of the majority", but I just ask that the one in charge is sensible enough... – Braiam Dec 14 '16 at 17:22
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    Give this guy a gold star! +1 @Cody eloquent as always – Lankymart Dec 14 '16 at 19:16
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A high question score does not make a question magically on-topic. I have numerous times flagged years-old posts with high scores, and had those questions promptly closed.

As an example, take Best Android backend for turn-based game?—it was 3 years old with a score of 5, I flagged it and it was closed in about an hour with quite a few downvotes accumulated.

As another example, take Why do some Java library methods delegate to a native method with a nearly-identical signature?—62 score, yet closed anyway.

The wording of the question is also very important—if it's worded ambiguously, it is highly likely to be closed as "unclear what you're asking".

Additionally, the OP's English skills have nothing to do with the question being closed. In most cases, someone edits the post to fix it, unless it's, for example, written in French or completely unintelligible.

Finally, if you think it was wrongly closed, remember that questions can be reopened! If five users with 3K rep vote within a 2-day period, then the question will be reopened. Editing can typically expedite the process by putting it into the Reopen Votes review queue, but remember to actually fix problems with the post.

  • Wait...was this question an example of a reasonable closure? Because I'm not sure I follow the logic behind that question's closure. – Cody Gray Dec 14 '16 at 16:48
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    @CodyGray shh! I'm trying to get it reopened through Meta-effect! – Nissa Dec 14 '16 at 16:49
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    Hmm yeah, that poor question has a long and sordid history. I'da never guessed. Looks like another case of people getting hung up on key words. The question is clearly not meant to be subjective or opinion-based. It's asking about the purpose of a very specific code pattern, something that is both reasonably scoped and can be objectively answered. And I don't buy this nonsense about "no one knows but the Java designers". That's true about the meaning of volatile in C#, too. – Cody Gray Dec 14 '16 at 16:52
  • "it was 3 years old with a score of 5, I flagged it and it was closed in about an hour with quite a few downvotes accumulated." The reason that the question was closed within a short period of time, whether you flagged it or not, was because a user requested members of the SOCVR review that user's own moderation action of voting to close the question as being a request for an off-site resource, which was prompted by the question receiving this now deleted duplicate answer. – user4639281 Dec 14 '16 at 20:10
  • Also, one user reviewed the post in the close vote review queue, possibly due to your flag. Most close flags don't result in expedient closure of a question. In fact, most of my close flags from before I could vote to close questions actually aged away instead of being closed via the close vote review queue due to the close vote review queue being so darn big. – user4639281 Dec 14 '16 at 20:11
  • Another example: stackoverflow.com/q/701166/6392939 – RamenChef Dec 15 '16 at 1:31
  • @CodyGray The OP has told me (in person, see my profile) that they will flag it for a lock if it gets closed a 4th time. Apparently it also has a delete vote somehow. Not worrying about it being deleted though because it would take 8 votes to do that :P – Nissa Dec 15 '16 at 3:47
  • I recognize the names of many of the close voters as regular Meta participants. Has this question been the focus of a Meta discussion before? Also, cool. Had no idea you had a personal connection to RamenChef. – Cody Gray Dec 15 '16 at 11:32
  • @CodyGray I posted it on Meta, but I deleted the post that mentioned it. – Nissa Dec 15 '16 at 13:39
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The close reason shown in the "on hold" notice applies straightforwardly to your question:

"Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example."

One of the key reasons behind the existence of that close reason is that a Stack Overflow question should be both useful and discoverable to others facing similar issues to those expressed in the question. "Where I have gone wrong?", on its own, is a question which is only useful to the asker, and your question, as written, does not tell us about any other, more well-defined, problem.

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    I was pretty frustrated because the reasoning behind closing the question was unclear to me. I've been set straight. Thanks. :) – timgavin Dec 14 '16 at 16:38

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