30

Consider the below Snippet:

console.log("Hello.");
console.log("OMG. See how big?");
div {
  border: 1px dashed #f90;
  background: #fc6;
  line-height: 5;
  text-align: center;
}

Because of the CSS I used, the console is messed up. Can this be sandboxed or fixed?

In contrast, here's what the console is supposed to look like:

console.log("Hello.");
console.log("How it's supposed to look.");

  • 11
    Shouldn't you avoid CSS on all divs anyway? I mean, this is kind of exactly why you would want to follow that as a best practice, I think... – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 18:26
  • 14
    @jpmc26 no, in my opinion if you want to make an answer here on SO you may want to keep your snippet as simple as possible why complicate with another container or extra classes that doesn't add any value to the real code issue just to avoid the bug of the snippets ... – DaniP Dec 13 '16 at 18:57
  • 2
    @DaniP Because of novices who won't recognize that you're using bad practices and will make someone else's life a living hell trying to clean up their uninformed mess. Why does it have to be complicated, anyway? Just add a stinkin' ID or class. It's not that complex. – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 19:01
  • 4
    @jpmc26 I guess that is another discussion and isn't the topic of the question itself each scenario has its own particularities, there is no bad practice here. – DaniP Dec 13 '16 at 19:12
  • 2
    @DaniP It's absolutely relevant. SO shouldn't spend a lot of time implementing features that shouldn't be necessary in a good post. – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 19:46
  • 9
    Console has more issues than just being slightly overlapping with the div styling. It was a hacky solution, and so that is what you are using. If you ask me, there shouldn't even need to be a built in "console". If a user does not know what a console is, then it is more important to teach them how to use the console than anything else in their more than likely low quality question. – Travis J Dec 13 '16 at 20:39
  • @TravisJ Agreed half-heartedly with you. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 20:59
  • Flawed very much! – Manoj Kumar Dec 14 '16 at 16:32
  • My only concern with this is that is may invalidate posts that rely on this bug. They are probably very infrequent (if in existence at all) so I say go for it. – DavidG Dec 14 '16 at 17:16
  • 4
    @jpmc26 What you should do isn't what you get on Stack Overflow. It's it's not a valid argument to blame the user. – Madara Uchiha Dec 15 '16 at 10:28
  • Agreed whole heartedly with @MadaraUchiha! :) – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 15 '16 at 10:28
  • @jpmc26 When people are able to write professional code, why do they come to Stack Overflow? They want their **** code to be corrected. So when the **** code is put inside the snippet, then it breaks the snippet, which shouldn't happen. This is what my argument is. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 15 '16 at 10:30
  • 1
    @PraveenKumar: "They want their bad code to be corrected." That's not what SO is for. We're not a code reviewing service. – Cerbrus Dec 15 '16 at 10:52
  • 4
    Most come here with broken code. SO's focus is on helping solve programming issues, to become a repository of quality Q/A. We don't have to put up with junk questions. – Cerbrus Dec 15 '16 at 11:28
  • 1
    @TravisJ I disagree, displaying the snippet's console output on the page itself is an extremely useful UX improvement which is helpful to all users, regardless of whether or not they know how to use their browser's built-in console. I shouldn't need to open the devtools in my browser in order to use Stack Overflow. I agree though that the current implementation is really hacky and should be fixed. – Ajedi32 Dec 15 '16 at 19:47
16

Don't change this.

I regularly see users leverage this to change the console output:

console.log("Gee,\n\nthis\n\nis\n\na\n\nlo\no\no\no\no\no\no\nng\n\nstring!");
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

This is very convenient if the only output you have is some console.log statements. Changing this will also break those existing answers.

If you have to have a CSS rule on all div tags, just add a wrapper in your answer:

console.log("Yay, the console isn't red!");
.wrapper div {
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  background-color: red;
  margin: 2px;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
  <div></div>
</div>

I'd even argue that this has educational value, as it's a perfect example of why CSS classes on all div elements are troublesome.

  • Telling you again, when noobs come with yucky code, they might mess up the console right? I really agree with the "leverage" part. :) – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 14 '16 at 10:55
  • 11
    We can't expect stack snippets to work, regardless of what "noobs" throw at them. At some point, we have to say: "If it's not working, fix your snippet's code" – Cerbrus Dec 14 '16 at 10:58
  • 4
    This workaround would be obviated by making the console area vertically resizable. :-) – Cody Gray Dec 14 '16 at 16:15
  • 3
    @Cerbrus Sure we can. Wrap the console in an ID, use a proper reset with high specificity. Then you can still override stuff if you really want to, but accidental alterations are unlikely. – Madara Uchiha Dec 15 '16 at 10:26
  • 2
    There could be a console.maximize() method, or something like that. The console should be isolated. – Oriol Dec 15 '16 at 18:15
  • I don't really see any use case for this that wouldn't be better addressed by a change to the global styling of the console across all answers. For instance, if being able to view long strings like that is an issue, then the console UI should be made resizable. Furthermore, you shouldn't be including code in your snippets that isn't relevant to the answer you're posting. It's just noise. – Ajedi32 Dec 15 '16 at 19:33
  • 2
    @Ajedi32, it's not just noise. Often "superfluous" CSS makes the answer clearer (outlining, highlighting, readability, etc.) While test buttons are useful to test/show dynamic parts of the code but aren't part of the answer themselves. ... It would be nice to be able to hide/minimize this "presentation" code separately though. – Brock Adams Dec 15 '16 at 19:42
  • @BrockAdams I think there's a difference between "this code helps illustrate the answer", and "this code makes the snippet's console look pretty". One is code the reader might actually be interested in reading in order to better understand the answer, while the other is completely irrelevant noise. (Or worse, actively confusing to readers who don't understand what it's intended to do.) But yes, I do agree that in some situations it might be helpful to be able to collapse sections of snippets. See meta.stackoverflow.com/q/272351/1157054 – Ajedi32 Dec 15 '16 at 19:58
  • Wouldn't a .as-console-wrapper,.as-console-wrapper *{all:unset} rule be better though? Would still not fix the js side of the problem, but at least, we would still be able to style the console on purpose, and in the mean wouldn't do it accidentally by any selector with lower priority than .as-console-wrapper. – Kaiido Aug 3 '18 at 8:06
4

Yes, this should be fixed. CSS leaking into the console isn't the only issue; there are a lot of potential problems that can be caused by the fact that the console isn't isolated from the rest of the snippet.

For example, here is an additional test case taken from Oriol's answer to the original post on SE meta announcing the introduction of the console feature (modified slightly to better illustrate the problem):

// Demonstration that `length` on the jQuery instance will be 0
// if there are no matching elements. There are no `div` elements
// in this snippet.
$(function() {
  console.log("Number of div elements:", $("div").length);
});
<p>No div elements here!</p>

<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

Yes, you can work around these issues as the snippet author once you realize what the problem is, but you really shouldn't have to; the console should not be able to interfere with the behavior of snippets.


To address some of the points made in a few of the other answers to this question:

But isn't using a generic selector like div in your snippet a bad idea anyway?

No, using simplified code like the example above is a perfectly acceptable way to illustrate a concept like the behavior of a method or CSS property.

Yes, using it in production where you have other divs on the page you don't want to count would be incorrect, but "counting divs" isn't the point of the answer; illustrating the usage of the length property is. There are numerous other situations where simplified examples like this are appropriate.

But I like being able to style the console to make it work better/look nicer in my snippets!

Using code in your snippet to modify the behavior of the console is a neat hack, but it's still just that: a hack. It'd be far better for Stack Overflow to incorporate those improvements into the console itself so that all answers can benefit from them. (For example, rather than you using CSS to increase the display size of the console, Stack Overflow should just make the console resizable.)

Additionally, including code like that in your answers which has no relevance to the question whatsoever is noise at best, and at worst can be confusing to readers who don't understand what that extra code is meant to be doing. (E.g. "Why is he styling .as-console-wrapper? I don't see that in the snippet code.")

  • In situations where console output is required (aka including the console is required), it's overwhelmingly unlikely that CSS is required. So we should really be educating users to write more minimal MCVEs, instead. – TylerH Dec 15 '16 at 22:07
  • @TylerH Again, CSS isn't the only potential problem here. The example I gave in my answer is a very minimal snippet using JS and the DOM, yet it is still affected by this issue. – Ajedi32 Dec 15 '16 at 22:11
  • Still, why would you be selecting all the div elements, and not educating the user that they should be using a more specific selector to mitigate such an issue in the first place. – user4639281 Dec 15 '16 at 23:29
  • @TinyGiant Because the details of what selector you're using are not relevant to the problem, or even the focus of the answer. In which case simpler is better. – Ajedi32 Dec 16 '16 at 14:18
-4

I don't think this is worth spending time implementing. You shouldn't be globally assigning a style to div in professional code, anyway. As I understand it (as a developer not focused on HTML/CSS/JS), this would be very bad form since the div element is so generic. Just use a class. It's simple and will actively improve your post.

console.log("Hello.");
console.log("OMG. See how big?");
.myclass {
  border: 1px dashed #f90;
  background: #fc6;
  line-height: 5;
  text-align: center;
}

  • 1
    If the downvoters would like to point out any incorrect statements or anything I'm missing, I'd be all too willing to learn. – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 19:51
  • 6
    Man, this is a flaw with the system okay? I am trying to make sure the system is flawless. Don't you understand the question at all? This is not Stack Overflow for correcting the code. And ps: downvotes here doesn't cause you any damage. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 19:52
  • 5
    I fail to see how it's a flaw if the page does exactly what you told it to: style all divs. P.S. I know what downvotes are for here. I still like to know what causes disagreement with an answer I post. – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 19:52
  • 3
    No, I didn't ask that the console should follow the styles that are inside the page. :) – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 19:53
  • 4
    It's like this. You are not sanitizing the user's inputs on a login application, and preaching, Users should input only their username and password, not SQL Injection attacks! The developer is the lame loser! Do you not make it fail-safe? – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 19:54
  • 5
    @PraveenKumar It's a computer. It does what you tell it to. Your code does say, "style all divs thusly". You can't argue against that. If for some reason, you think it shouldn't do exactly what you told it to, then you need more explanation. And we're talking about page appearance, not data loss here. – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 19:55
  • 2
    Man, I am not sure if you are trolling me or you genuinely don't understand the issue here. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 19:55
  • 1
    I understand the issue. I'm saying, "Don't do things you shouldn't do anyway, and don't ask other people to waste time implementing features to make it easier for you to create lower quality content." – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 19:56
  • 5
    totally agree to not spend time on fixing this. – rene Dec 13 '16 at 20:02
  • 4
    @PraveenKumar Yes, and creating lower quality content is misusing. =) If this is an actual vulnerability, then please edit your question to show how it can misused and I'll delete my answer. There's no "ethics" here unless this is actually dangerous. Or you could argue that this isn't bad practice, as I've stated it is. If I'm right about it being bad practice, though, you shouldn't post this code anyway even if they do make changes to accommodate. As it stands, your responses have no actual substance. – jpmc26 Dec 13 '16 at 20:02
  • 3
    @jpmc26 Since this is just a CSS thing, it cannot be misused. Let's say, a noob, who posts a CSS question and asks for help (where the code written is crap) and then it uses global tag styles, then obviously the console gets affected. What if, div {position: absolute !important;} is one of the definitions? And the noob is here to genuinely get fixed, but the console is coming up and messing his code? – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 20:03
  • 6
    @jpmc26 Lemme tell you, there is no vulnerability here. I don't mind the lazy people telling don't fix, but seriously, if I was the product owner, I'll make sure this gets fixed ASAP. This is a bug, a confirmed UI loopwhole in the system. Who now-a-days takes UI seriously? That's the reason! :( ps: I am a UX Architect, it pricks me. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 13 '16 at 20:05
  • 4
    If people were able to write professional code correctly, they wouldn't be asking questions about it. So this seems like a relatively poor argument for fixing a UX problem on a Q&A site. – Cody Gray Dec 14 '16 at 2:19
  • 1
    It is not inherently bad form to add styles to the generic div tag with div {}. Sloppy code that does that is bad because it's sloppy, not because it's bad form. Sometimes it's efficient and semantic to do it. – TylerH Dec 14 '16 at 15:20
  • 25
    2 delete votes on a perfectly valid answer. Guys, even if the answer is wrong, that's not a reason to delete it. – Cerbrus Dec 14 '16 at 15:27

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