26

There is a canonical question and answers, Is floating point math broken? for why there are rounding errors on floating point arithmetic. If a question asks why there are floating point rounding errors, I fully agree with closing as a duplicate of that question.

There is a subtly different type of question, example Java float precision, that asks about options to handle the consequences of rounding error in a specific situation. As the OP for the example question said in a comment while it was marked as a duplicate "I want a solution not an explanation why this is happening.".

In my opinion, answering those questions would add to the usefulness of the site, by building a database of practical advice programmers could apply if they have the same situation.

There seems to be a current policy of rapidly closing any Java question that asks how to handle floating point rounding as a duplicate of "Is floating point math broken?". It seems to be a reflex reaction to seeing floating point rounding errors mentioned in a question, without thinking about whether the claimed duplicate really answers the new question.

Possibly, we could add all the situation-specific advice to the canonical duplicate. There are two problems with that. First, it just asks why the issue exists - advice for handling rounding error is not responsive to that question. Second, finding the advice for a specific case would be a linear search through all the answers to that question, not a database lookup the way StackOverflow is supposed to operate.

Can anything be done to stop this? Perhaps impose a waiting period on marking as a duplicate in this particular case, so that people can see if the question has question-specific answers?

  • 4
    I'm not sure about Java, but in some other languages this might easily become a library recommendation question which is off-topic. – Bergi Dec 12 '16 at 4:42
  • 9
    Why "impose a waiting period on marking as a duplicate in this particular case," when such closures are justified 99% of the time? If someone reviews the closure and thinks it isn't appropriate, there are already proper channels for that. – TigerhawkT3 Dec 12 '16 at 5:50
  • 3
    I suspect people like to close-vote FP questions as dupe of the good old "is FP math broken" because most people, despite having read that, still believe that it is broken and that there's just nothing that can be done about it ever. That's not really a problem with the mechanics of the site, it's a widespread attitude/knowledge problem among developers. – harold Dec 13 '16 at 11:00
27

There is a subtly different type of question, example Java float percision, that asks about options to handle the consequences of rounding error in a specific situation. As the OP for the example question said in a comment while it was marked as a duplicate "I want a solution not an explanation why this is happening.".

It is not a duplicate of the canonical, indeed, and it shouldn't be closed as such. I'd argue that is not as much because the OP asked for "a solution not an explanation", but rather because it involves both a concrete instance of rounding error accumulation (an issue which is merely touched upon in abstract by the second answer to the canonical) and a XY problem of not distinguishing the precision of a number and how it is displayed (which is addressed in your answer by the use of DecimalFormat, and is not part of the canonical question at all).

Two additional remarks:

  • Even if it is not a duplicate, it would make sense to link to the canonical question, as a pointer to the OP in case they feel like reading a more in-depth treatment of the issue beyond their practical problem.

  • I presume the more specific XY scenario is relatively common. That being so, it is conceivable to think of a duplicate target specially tailored for it, which would presumably link to the "main" canonical question so that the long explanation of the underlying issue doesn't have to be repeated.

Possibly, we could add all the situation-specific advice to the canonical duplicate. There are two problems with that. First, it just asks why the issue exists - advice for handling rounding error is not responsive to that question. Second, finding the advice for a specific case would be a linear search through all the answers to that question, not a database lookup the way StackOverflow is supposed to operate.

I agree that, given the scope of the canonical answer, it would not be a good idea to expand it to cover such issues. Another option beyond adding extra answers would be adding extra sections to the main answer, but in this case the first problem you point out would still remain.

Can anything be done to stop this? Perhaps impose a waiting period on marking as a duplicate in this particular case, so that people can see if the question has question-specific answers?

I don't think this would help. I guess it would only create an obstacle for appropriate closures while failing to stop hasty close voters.

  • 1
    In addition to the use of DecimalFormat, there is a standard technique to avoid cumulative rounding error due to iterating over a floating point variable that the OP apparently did not know. – Patricia Shanahan Dec 11 '16 at 15:56
  • 1
    @PatriciaShanahan A fair point. I edited the first paragraph of my answer accordingly. By the way, the question is now closed against a better duplicate target, which does cover the technique you mention (though merely as the third answer there). – duplode Dec 11 '16 at 16:12
  • 17
    I don't think hasty close-voting is a serious problem. If anything, it gets the person quickly to something that might be a solution. If, later, someone like @Patricia comes along and believes that it would be better served by a unique, specific answer, then they can use their dupe-hammer in reverse to reopen it and provide that answer. I would honestly feel better about a possible duplicate getting quickly closed and then potentially reopened by an expert, rather than having it languish and accumulate a bunch of redundant, pointless answers. – Cody Gray Dec 11 '16 at 16:13
  • 2
    @CodyGray I tend to agree, given how hard it can be to close obvious duplicates in a timely fashion. – duplode Dec 11 '16 at 16:24
  • 15
    @CodyGray all very well for those with dupe hammers. Less so for the rest of us. I've almost never successfully gotten a question reopened merely by voting for it to be reopened; looking down my "reopen" vote list, I see [duplicate] or [closed] next to pretty much every entry, with the majority of exceptions being wholly rewritten questions or ones I fought for on Meta. – Mark Amery Dec 12 '16 at 14:08

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .