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Yesterday I met a question which is absolutely useless for people as same as answer to it. More, it has only one answer, there can't be other answers by a lot of reasons. The main reasons for saying this content is useless are:

  1. The code completion mechanisms are not provided by the language itself; it is a third-party project (but the question is tagged "rust" and not "rust-racer"). Anyway, the code completion mechanism is not a god, and it can't know everything. Moreover, it can work unstable and just be not completing correct code. There is no reason for creating a question about your completion mechanism on Stack Overflow if your question is not about it, if it is - provide correct tags (for your code completion mechanism) and ask the appropriate question.
  2. If you have a question - use google for the solution, do not create the question on Stack Overflow immediately. This is the main rule of Stack Overflow - avoid duplicate questions, avoid useless questions, try to find the solution or your problem somewhere else first. Then, if you were unable to find anything, ask the community.
  3. It is very obvious that such kind of functions can be found immediately on the language standard library' reference. The question asks an obvious question; about 90% of developers which use Rust language may need this function. Again, you do not even need google this moment; you just need the language library reference, which may be saved as a PDF file, or at least its web address is constant and may be added to your bookmarks.
  4. Saying this would content be useful for people means people are unable to find this information anywhere else, but the question's author have not even tried to find it. He only says "my code completion have not worked well". Is this a reason for creating a content on Stack Overflow now?
  5. The only thing that should be changed (if it is not yet) is Google's search result page which should contain direct links with anchors to the needed function, but, again, Stack Overflow does not provide this functionality; this it not what it is intended for, so there is no reason to ask questions like this here.
  6. The author admits that the content can be found on the language's standard library reference page. He has even included this information into his own answer to his own question.

There are few reasons more, but I decided not to write them down here. And just imagine that Stack Overflow has tons of obvious useless questions like:

Is there a way to increment a integer variable in Rust?

And the answer:

Oh, I have it commented in my code, this is simple:

    let mut i = 0u64;
    i += 1;

I have told about the rating just because found it strange: the user has such a high rating and asks such obvious and useless questions and more - he thinks they can be useful.

Personally I deleted a lot of my questions because they were obvious and useless for others in my opinion. They could be easily found, or there was something else which made the content low-quality. I don't think people need such kind of information.

I still think there are some kind of questions which are better to keep undeleted, because they may seem obvious, but the answer does not really stare you in the face.

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    If you feel the question is useless, down vote and/or close vote it and move on. – yannis Dec 8 '16 at 7:25
  • @Yannis I thought it needs to be deleted if it is useless or low-quality or something else. More, I was asked a lot of times to delete my question by another people because the also told that. – Victor Polevoy Dec 8 '16 at 7:27
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    Not a stellar question, but not dreadful either. Downvote and move on. And nobody can oblige you to delete your own content. And in general I see no reason to delete borderline content other than with the mechanism we already have – Bart Dec 8 '16 at 7:45
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    To be fair, the fist google search result for "Rust string endswith" links to the rust docs for the string primitive, where the ends_with function is easily found if you search for "ends" or "suffix". People need to learn how to search. – Cerbrus Dec 8 '16 at 7:54
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    Yeah, that's pretty stoopid Q+A. Hard to dismiss it, the CEO likes this kind of stuff. Don't let that slow you down. You'd have to wonder a bit how actively harmful this is to the programming profession. Is this going to turn us all into brainless code monkeys that are only skilled in using Google? I suspect that SO is a foreshadowing of what the tricorder is going to do to the medical profession some day :) – Hans Passant Dec 8 '16 at 8:22
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The code completion mechanisms are not provided by the language itself, it is a third-party project (but the question is tagged "rust" and not "rust-racer"). Anyway, the code completion mechanism is not a god, it can't know everything, moreover it can work unstable and just be not completing correct code. There is no reason for creating a question about your completion mechanism on stackoverflow if your question is not about it, if it is - provide correct tags (for your code completion mechanism) and ask the appropriate question.

The question is literally "What is the Rust equivalent of Go's HasSuffix() function?". It is not at all about code completion.

If you have a question - use google for the solution, do not create the question on stackoverflow immediately. This is the main rule of stackoverflow - avoid duplicate questions, avoid useless questions, try to find the solution or your problem somewhere else first. Then, if you were unable to find anything, ask the community.

Google often points to Stack Overflow when given programming queries, as you surely know. The author explicitly addressed this point in the comments: "Yeah, the ends_with function doesn't show up nicely in Google. I'm betting this question will. Edit: Yep it's already 4th, and by far the most obviously title, so I think it will help some people."

The author admits that the content can be found on the language's standard library reference page, he has even included this information into his own answer on his own question.

That is not, on its own, a reason for closing a question (cf. for instance Are standard library function requests on-topic?). There can be plenty of non-obvious things buried in standard library documentation.


If you are not convinced by the arguments of the author, you are free to downvote, or even to cast a close vote (though in this case I believe you would have difficulties in finding a reason that applies). This Meta question, however, feels like a significant overreaction.

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    The question is literally "What is the Rust equivalent of Go's HasSuffix() function?" - exactly! And the reason for asking this question was "my code completion did not work well", neither "I was unable to find it elsewhere", nor "I have tried to do something". This question can be marked low-quality at least for "Show what you've tried" rule of stackoverflow. – Victor Polevoy Dec 8 '16 at 8:17
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Right. So...Stack Overflow has, over the years, accrued these types of questions in various languages and frameworks. Here's an example off the top of my Google searches for "increment" in Java.

However, they're not exactly bad. There's a few factors at play here.

  • The language may not be mature enough yet. There are a lot of people who rely on Stack Overflow to help with documentation in places that the official/formal documentation slacks (hey, that Documentation project is coming on a treat...), and the best place they believe to capture/codify that knowledge is here.

    That is a good thing. We actually want that kind of knowledge here. This gives it a suitable audience to curate, verify, validate and ensure that the information is accurate.

  • The official documentation is incomplete. This comes back to my first point: if Stack Overflow has that kind of knowledge here, then we're doing it right for now.

  • The language may not have well-illustrated examples on how to approach common problems. Since the OP here specifically references a feature they use in Go, and they'd like to be able to use something similar in Rust, then that's when a question spurs into existence. It probably shouldn't without some searching around, but that's usually how it happens.

To the point of "easily Googleable" questions...sure, sometimes they are, and sometimes they aren't. Honestly, the Java question I linked to makes me believe that the OP hasn't done any legwork whatsoever. I digress; if you believe that a question is poorly researched, then vote accordingly. Calling it "useless" out the gate bestows bad faith on the part of the asker, and it's simpler to assume good faith and good intentions on their part.

Besides, if enough people decide that they should've just Googled it, it'll get plenty of downvotes.


On the point of "downvotes"...

Personally I deleted a lot of my questions because they were obvious and useless for others in my opinion, they could be easily found, or there was something else which made the content low-quality. I don't think people need such kind of information.

This may be a premature reaction. We've had a user in the past delete their submitted content at will, which was likely considered valuable before it was removed.

The only real way you know if your questions aren't that good or if no one else is making use of the information is through the votes. If you're getting negative votes, that's a strong signal that others aren't finding your questions or answers all that useful. At that point, you should start to cull that sort of content, since it really isn't going to be helping anyone; anything sooner and you may start raising eyebrows.

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    "The official documentation is incomplete" In this case, this is not the case. The function is well documented. It's also got an example – Cerbrus Dec 8 '16 at 7:55
  • @Cerbrus: Yes, we've well-established that this particular question could've been found by a Google search. But in all honesty, is the fact that the question was asked and an answer was highlighted the worst thing to happen? If nothing else, this sort of information was better exposed to the audience that wants it. I don't deny that the user should've did a better job searching, but again, I'm really not all that upset about this one. – Makoto Dec 8 '16 at 7:57
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    It's not bad, but I did cv it as a request for an off-site resource, for that reason. I don't see the added value in diluting the search results with an answer that basically links to the official documentation. If the function name wasn't mentioned, it would've been a link-only answer. – Cerbrus Dec 8 '16 at 7:58
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    @Cerbrus: You could make the argument that any question asking if there's similar functionality from language A and language B could be closed as asking for an off-site resource. I don't necessarily believe this to be the case in this instance - even if it were a link that said, "Go to the docs", one should be studious enough to identify that this is a link to an actual, good resource which can be referenced and an answer can actually be built from it. Again, I'm not saying that this is a good question, but I'm not saying that it is so bad that it should be closed. – Makoto Dec 8 '16 at 8:01
  • I don't think that the Java question in your first paragraph is a fair comparison. In that question, the OP tried something and was confused why it didn't work as expected. It's perhaps not a stellar question, but still a lot better than a "how can I do foo which is easily findable in the obvious documentation page", which is that the Rust question is. – Martin Tournoij Jan 2 '17 at 4:08
  • @Carpetsmoker: It's still easily Googleable. One of the most common things to look up is how to iterate by a value other than 1. Even if you exclude Stack Overflow from that search, you come up with a wealth of knowledge. Also, it isn't like that sort of information wouldn't be found in a discussion about C or C++ since they use virtually the same syntax in loops. I stand by my assertion that the OP doesn't seem to have really looked around on that particular problem. – Makoto Jan 2 '17 at 5:48
  • I respectfully disagree. The Rust question can only be answered with one possible answer: a link to the documentation ("RTFM"), while the Java question can (and has been) answered with a more thorough explanation which combines various concepts from the Java language. As mentioned before, I don't think it's a particularly great question, but a hell of a lot better than the Rust question. – Martin Tournoij Jan 2 '17 at 7:28
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Yes, SO needs all on-topic useful questions and answers. SO is also designed to prevent single person to decide usefulness of the content.

If you feel that content is useless - downvote, consider if vote to close is appropriate.

Do not flag for moderator attention - flag will be declined as community can decide whether particular piece of content is useful or not.

On concrete question: without digging through searches and reading documentation question look acceptable - often enough similar functions in two languages/libraries to be found in completely different places. Sometimes documentation on particular usage is lacking.

With trying to search - result for "Rust string suffix" immediately points to official documentation (and searching for "suffix" on that page points to right function). So question clearly demonstrates complete lack of research and should be downvoted on that reason.

Note that question may have an answer that is easy to find on search engines, but still end-up being voted up as useful on SO as many people favor SO over other places. Or maybe question got some particular search term that many people use to find feature and just can't hit documentation with searches due to using "wrong" terms.

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    This specific example is well documented and easily found if you just google "Rust string ends with" – Cerbrus Dec 8 '16 at 8:00
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    @Cerbrus thanks, I've updated the answer. – Alexei Levenkov Dec 8 '16 at 8:38

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