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This question was deemed opinion-based by five people, incorrectly in my opinion. So I voted to re-open.

My question is, now that is on hold, and doesn't appear on the front page (I think), how is anyone ever supposed to find it and read the comments and potentially decide to vote to reopen, unless they happen to be scanning the reopen queue, and unless I'm missing something, while doing that comments on questions are not displayed, meaning the person deciding whether to reopen or not from the queue has no immediate access to potentially useful comments that might relate to why to reopen or not.

Should we notify people voting to close of comments that might relate to a reason that might convince them to reverse their vote and/or vote to reopen? Personally even if I dupehammer a question I wouldn't mind being alerted to a comment about why someone thought that was wrong.

Anyway, I think this question is interesting, and could have useful answers relating to the use of micro-classes and the semantics of CSS classes.


I'm usually not the one taking the side of the poor abused low-rep user, but in this case Jules must be experiencing a severe case of whiplash. First his question was closed as "opinion-based" by five people not all of whom, let me say, had sterling CSS credentials; then it was re-opened; meanwhile it was downvoted four times; and then it was closed yet again, for the same bogus "opinion-based" reason.

Let's say for purposes of argument that he was looking for a performance benchmark for the two styles of writing CSS. Whatever that question is, it's not "opinion-based"; neither does it qualify as "too broad" or any other close reason. Fine, downvote, fine, comment that he should run the benchmark himself, but why on earth would ten people vote to close for clearly fallacious reasons? What we have here, I am guessing, is yet another case of people who decide they don't like the question and can't just leave it at a downvote; they have to pile on with a "double downvote" in the form of a vote to close, no matter how ludicrous the reason.

At this point, people who already voted to reopen the first time are not even allowed to vote to reopen the second time, so we have to find someone else to kick off the reopen vote, at which point it goes into the review queue but will most likely never be reopened.

When I first read this question, I imagined the OP was asking a more general question about the two styles of CSS class design: micro-classes vs. kitchen-sink classes. I assumed that his intent in using the word "efficiency" was actually "best in terms of conciseness, readability, writability, maintainability, usability, and extendibility". If that had been the case, then there would at least be some logic in calling the question "too broad" and/or "opinion-based". But as I pointed out in my comment on the post, just because a question has no single, obvious answer does not necessarily mean it's too broad. It could have several possible answers, depending on the circumstances. In that case, a good answer can still identify the relevant criteria and point out how they would affect the choice of a solution. Come on. It's not like this question was "how do I get started writing a website in PHP?", or "which is better, FORTRAN or COBOL?".

CSS class design is no simple matter, and everyone has an opinion. Books can and have been written on the topic. But there mere existence of a book, or the possibility of writing a book, does not in itself make a question too broad or opinion-based. We already have answers, some of them with hundreds or thousands of upvotes, which approach book-length. :-) An answer can provide a gist of the issues and basic conclusions, and such answers are useful, and the questions that lead to such answers are useful, and they enhance the short-term and long-term value of the site.

I'm puzzled. We have a hard time closing the 1000th question about how to center a div, yet the hordes descend to close interesting questions (granted with poor titles, or poor choices of words like "efficiency") which I had thought were the very kind of interesting programming problem we were trying to attract and provide great answers to.

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    unless they happen to be scanning the reopen queue, and I mean does anyone really do that See for yourself, rather than asking us. – Servy Dec 5 '16 at 17:58
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    It has been reopened now. And yes, people are reviewing the reopen queue. – Glorfindel Dec 5 '16 at 18:00
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    The reopen queue is routinely emptied.... So.... There is your answer. – Patrice Dec 5 '16 at 18:10
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    And it now has 3 close votes because of this meta question. – user4639281 Dec 5 '16 at 18:13
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    Seems like a mashup of a list-of-things and yes-or-no question, with a sprinkling of why-didn't-you-just-profile-it-yourself on top. – Will Dec 5 '16 at 18:15
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    @Will I think it could be edited to be a better question, and while I do see how an answer could be "profile it yourself", I think that it might be able to bring some kind of insight. When you actually look at how the code is interpretted and applied to the elements, performance considerations at repaint, etc. – user4639281 Dec 5 '16 at 18:17
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    We need to look past the all-too-common wording of "most efficient", used reflexively by lots of more junior folks, and interpret it more broadly as efficient in terms of writing, reading, using, maintaining, and extending code. Perversely, if the question is about run-time performance, then it's exactly not opinion-based. – user663031 Dec 5 '16 at 18:20
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    It may not be opinion based but it's certainly too broad. – Paulie_D Dec 5 '16 at 18:26
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    Well if we need to look past the common wording of something, I'd be tempted to say that the onus is on the question asked to be CLEAR what he means... if "most efficient" doesn't mean what it tends to be taken as, then your question could be construed as unclear. You need to be precise in the metrics you want "most efficient" to be considered as. – Patrice Dec 5 '16 at 18:45
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    As I said, the question could be clarified and improved quite a bit, as can most posts. For some reason I feel this could yield a useful answer or two. Though I can't help but notice that the OP has done nothing but post the original question – user4639281 Dec 5 '16 at 18:48
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    @torazaburo Performance isn't necessarily as objective as you might think. Writing performance sensitive code is virtually all about weighing competing costs and benefits, and trying to determine as much as possible about the likely inputs, as most non-trivial performance decisions come down to make certain situations faster while making others slower, exchanging CPU operations and memory, etc. It's rather rare to see strictly better improvements in any professional code. And that's if you care about literally nothing but the execution time of the program. – Servy Dec 5 '16 at 19:10
  • @Patrice But as I mentioned elsewhere, if "most efficient" does mean what it tends to be taken as, then there's even less reason--actually no reason at all--to consider this opinion-based. You write a benchmark, get the numbers, and that's the answer. Other than opinions about how to write the benchmark, how is that "opinion-based"? – user663031 Dec 5 '16 at 19:27
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    Yeah opinion-based might not apply here. But as others have mentioned, too-broad does, doesn't it? Can you think of a way to narrow the scope a bit? I'll gladly vote to reopen if so – Clive Dec 5 '16 at 19:30
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    @torazaburo In my experience most all of them make bad questions. In order for them to be appropriate questions they need to include a lot more than just "how do I make X faster?" The question needs lots of specifics about what the exact situation is, what the performance requirements are, for each metric, the priorities between metrics, an explanation of why the current code fails to meet those metrics, etc. Almost nobody does that, it's just a code dump with "plz fix" at the end. For the record, I prefer "Too Broad" as the close reason for such questions over opinion based. – Servy Dec 5 '16 at 19:30
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    Even if you only look at the "efficiency" question, that is still impossible to answer. It varies by browser, version, page, structure of the DOM, just how small the rules are broken down, what the rules are. This is all of too broad, unclear, and opinion-based. – ssube Dec 5 '16 at 19:49
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  • "Now that is on hold, and doesn't appear on the front page (I think), how is anyone ever supposed to find it and read the comments and potentially decide to vote to reopen?"
    It'll show up in the review queue
  • "unless they happen to be scanning the reopen queue, and I mean does anyone really do that?"
    There are barely any questions in the "Reopen" queue, so yes. People do look at it, there's plenty of activity in there.
  • "Should we notify people voting to close of comments that might relate to a reason that might convince them to reverse their vote and/or vote to reopen?"
    Please don't... I don't want to see every single reason an OP can come up with to re-open their question. That's exactly what we have the review queue for.

"What has the world come to, and what kind of example is being set, when our fearless leaders with reps of 100K and 200K randomly abuse close voting and arbitrarily invent contorted and completely inapplicable interpretations of close reasons for questions they don't like."

That's a bit dramatic.

The question, as is, is completely too broad. Servy covered it pretty well:

"In order for them to be appropriate questions they need to include a lot more than just "how do I make X faster?" The question needs lots of specifics about what the exact situation is, what the performance requirements are, for each metric, the priorities between metrics, an explanation of why the current code fails to meet those metrics, etc. Almost nobody does that, it's just a code dump with "plz fix" at the end. For the record, I prefer "Too Broad" as the close reason for such questions over opinion based."
(Emphasis mine)

There is no way the question can be answered correctly, without the answer turning into a complete book on the intricate details of how CSS works, per browser.

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