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I am working with the Android API and find many answers to my questions on Stack Overflow. Many of the questions are answered correctly, but the answers are from 2010-2012 and the APIs have been deprecated. Over time, as the API evolves, these answers become incorrect. When I find the newly correct way to do something, what is the right thing to do?

  1. Provide a new answer on an existing question? This will be much lower ranked and hard to find, but continues an existing question.
  2. Ask-and-answer a new question? This duplicates a question, but makes the answer easier to find.
  3. Comment on the selected-correct answer? This provides less context, but is more visible.

I would like to update the information to help others in my situation.

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    Related question: Good question, old version-dependent answer. – Glorfindel Dec 4 '16 at 17:47
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    I would suggest a new detailed Q&A. IMO, duplicates are good if they are for good reason. – Mr_Green Dec 5 '16 at 9:07
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    The problem is that the API may be deprecated, the question and answer are not as they're still relevant to the older iterations of the API. When an API/tool/framework tends to deprecate/evolve a lot, generally specific tags are introduced that date the question to that period. It may well be that the questions simply need a more defining tag rather than a catch-all "android" tag. – Gimby Dec 6 '16 at 13:55
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  1. Provide a new answer on an existing question? This will be much lower ranked and hard to find, but continues an existing question.

This is usually the correct option. Given some time, people will upvote your answer and it will rise to the top eventually. I'd combine that with

  1. Comment on the selected-correct answer?

if the old answer is really deprecated (as opposed to being merely a suboptimal solution). Something along the lines of

As of Android API level xx, the usage of yy is deprecated. Please see my answer for a modern solution.

('my answer' should link to your answer, of course)


I would like to update the information to help others in my situation.

In some situations, e.g. if the API change is really minor, editing an existing answer (as advocated by Braiam) is an option. However, one should be very careful – a related discussion is currently being held here.

  • "You shouldn't update the question" - sorry, I meant "question" in a more general sense, including the question and all following information. I've edited to clarify. – FazJaxton Dec 5 '16 at 16:23
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    @FazJaxton I've updated my answer accordingly. It's apparently a hot topic, see the question I linked to now. – Glorfindel Dec 5 '16 at 16:28
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    One of the biggest benefits of adding a new answer is that the question remains fully backwards-compatible. For as long as older versions of the API are available, there will always be a possibility that any given user may need a solution specifically relevant to an obsolete version (especially if they're interested in retrocomputing, or aiming for compatibility with older platforms). If the question continues to accumulate new answers as the API is updated, it continues to provide a solution for both current and outdated versions of the API. – Justin Time 2 Reinstate Monica Dec 5 '16 at 21:41
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    @FazJaxton- If you do make an edit to an existing answer, please don't replace the existing code with your own. Label your edit with 'update,' a date or version, etc. I'm trying to find some angular 2 beta questions, and google is good at that based on date range; however, certain users have been overwriting the correct answers (according to the timeframe that aligns to the beta) with the newer answers that only work with the final or rc versions. I've been reverting them as I see them =) – ps2goat Dec 5 '16 at 23:50
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    I think an edit to the top of the accepted answer saying "This answer was correct for versions up to x.y.x. Please see the updated answer below." Is the best way to help the most people. – TecBrat Dec 6 '16 at 19:50
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Update the answers. That's basically what the edit button is there for:

  • Fix mistakes
  • Improve posts
  • Update answers.
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    I think the OP is asking about questions where the old answers are not by him/her. Updating such an answer with the new solution would, in many cases, be a too major edit. – Glorfindel Dec 4 '16 at 17:46
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    @Glorfindel Recommended read: How do we encourage edits to obsolete/out of date answers? – Braiam Dec 4 '16 at 17:48
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    Thanks, I wasn't aware of that post. The problem is that editing a post without changing the intent of the OP is hard, and everywhere else we're explicitly teaching people not to do it. Posting a new answer is the safest option. – Glorfindel Dec 4 '16 at 17:55
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    @Glorfindel intent doesn't matter: the intent of the answerer is to answer the question, if it no longer do that, then what we are supposed to do? – Braiam Dec 4 '16 at 19:02
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    The answer might still apply for people using older versions of the API. – Glorfindel Dec 4 '16 at 19:04
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    @Glorfindel try to create an app using the v1 of SE api. Hint: you can't. – Braiam Dec 4 '16 at 19:12
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    For the SE API, it doesn't make sense. But for Android (like the OP's case) it certainly does; a lot of devices are still running on prehistoric versions of Android. – Glorfindel Dec 4 '16 at 19:14
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    @Glorfindel Exactly, you can't say "don't edit answers ever" because you will run into corner cases. – Braiam Dec 4 '16 at 19:19
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    Yes. It's very hard to give black and white rules :) – Glorfindel Dec 4 '16 at 19:22
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    @Glorfindel that's the point I'm trying to make. Editing is Good™, specially if you know what you are talking about, so discouraging editing can have far more damages with no counterpart good. (Authors are always notified of any edit on their answers, so that's largely a non-issue) – Braiam Dec 4 '16 at 20:01
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    Making large changes to other people's answers is Not Ok, regardless of context. If you feel like you need to add a lot of content, post your own answer. Going around rewriting people's answers will only get you flagged for vandalism. – ssube Dec 5 '16 at 20:07
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    @ssube Serious question: do you think we should edit someone post to add an addendum? How about to update the post as it ages? Hint: read the help center before answering. – Braiam Dec 5 '16 at 20:16
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    One of these days Braiam will lead one of the sides in the Great Wars of Editing Others' Posts ;) – Andras Deak Dec 5 '16 at 23:18
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    The really crazy thing is, I will be on Braiam's side in that war. I had no idea that this was such a contentious issue. It wasn't in the early days of the site; people seemed to welcome improvements and didn't have the same greedy notion of ownership that is so often referred to nowadays. I wonder if this is a sentiment that has arose from a bunch of low-quality edits having been accepted? – Cody Gray Dec 6 '16 at 12:04
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    @AndrasDeak I don't believe it should be that controversial, it's said in the help center and something meta has been very vocal about: if you don't like other people editing your post, SE is not the place for you. – Braiam Dec 6 '16 at 13:13

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