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I recently voted to reopen a question because it was, in my opinion, closed erroneously. Two people downvoted, three people offered completely incorrect (now deleted) answers, and five people voted to successfully place the question on hold. I believe that's because they were somehow unable to infer the issue or they mistakenly wrote it off as a duplicate selector specificity question.

Unfortunately, the question is actually about the counter-intuitive behavior of !important CSS styles inherited from ancestor elements. Now, the OP didn't know that... and neither did most of the people who read his question. So, I voted to reopen after revising it for clarity (although, I thought it was pretty clear to begin with).

With so many failures surrounding the reception and understanding of this question, I felt that maybe a moderator flag was warranted for reopening. However, I received a canned rejection:

should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention

I'm a little perplexed. When am I supposed to engage a moderator if not when there's a community failing? From the help center:

To be fair, the question has gained two more reopen votes; so, maybe there's hope that the review queue won't let it die over the weekend. Apparently it's dead already.

marked as duplicate by user6263819, Michał Perłakowski, Anthon, Blackwood, HaveNoDisplayName Dec 3 '16 at 1:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    The question got pushed into the reopen queue (see the timeline), where the consensus was 'Leave Closed'. A moderator isn't needed to reopen questions where the community can do it. – Aurora0001 Dec 2 '16 at 20:29
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    It shouldn't be reopened in its current state; the user has not provided the CSS code necessary to resolve the issue. – George Stocker Dec 2 '16 at 20:44
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    @GeorgeStocker you don't need the CSS given the HTML and the computed style information... but I will synthesize the necessary CSS if that somehow satisfies you. – canon Dec 2 '16 at 20:46
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    @canon And how do you know that it's representative of the OP's actual code? A given symptom can almost always have any number of different causes. If you just pick one, it's rather likely that you pick something different than the OP's actual problem. – Servy Dec 2 '16 at 21:03
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    @canon The problem with you syntesizing it is that it may be what the OP is doing, and it may not be. If there were only one way to generate a given output with CSS, I don't think we'd have so many problems with CSS as a language. – George Stocker Dec 2 '16 at 21:23
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    Note that the question is actually a duplicate, so it can be closed for that reason... – Heretic Monkey Dec 2 '16 at 21:30
  • @MikeMcCaughan Perfect, is it really? Uggh.... – canon Dec 2 '16 at 21:30
  • I think it's a dupe of stackoverflow.com/q/6129304/215552, but they are slightly different... – Heretic Monkey Dec 2 '16 at 21:31
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    @MikeMcCaughan Well apparently we're just editing questions so that they ask what we want them to already, regardless of the OP's actual situation, so why let that stop us now. – Servy Dec 2 '16 at 21:32
  • @servy my edits were based on the OP's markup and debug information, interaction in comments, and his acceptance of my answer. If you're uncomfortable following a very clear path back from that information, that's fine. I'm not. – canon Dec 2 '16 at 21:34
  • @Servy that does appear to be the case ;) – Heretic Monkey Dec 2 '16 at 21:34
  • @MikeMcCaughan I don't know if I'd close it as a dupe of that question after having read all the answers. Hmm. – canon Dec 2 '16 at 21:36
  • @canon Yeah, that's why I didn't vote. One of the answers on that question answers with much the same info as yours, but is a much worse question overall. – Heretic Monkey Dec 2 '16 at 21:39
  • @canon If you want to take what you feel is a sufficiently educated guess at an answer, that's one thing, but to edit the question to change it from what it was asking to what your guess is that it's asking, then that's very different. If you want to ask your own question, then ask your own question, don't edit your question into a question someone else is asking. – Servy Dec 2 '16 at 21:43
  • @Servy I don't know what to tell you, Servy. I'm pretty confident that's what the OP was asking. I wasn't trying to tailor his question to suit my answer... I was trying to make his question palatable to the down-voting, close-voting masses while preserving his intent. – canon Dec 2 '16 at 21:46
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Seconds after I posted this, you re-wrote the entire question to include an actual, runnable test case, thus fulfilling the requirements for a debugging question - I've responded by reopening. Leaving the answer below as an explanation for why your previous efforts were insufficient.


Quoting that help center list, so I can add emphasis:

  1. Leave a comment on the question itself calling for it to be reopened. Be detailed: explain why the question shouldn't have been closed. Be constructive: name-calling is as likely to drive folks away as it is win them to your cause. Remember, anyone on the site with at least 3,000 reputation points can vote to reopen a question - even if a moderator closed it.
  2. Be sure that you've read the close notice and any comments on the question so you can address any concerns raised there. Addressing the concerns often means editing the post, which any user may do.
  3. Flag the question for moderator attention. Again, explain why it should be reopened. There is more than one moderator, and moderators do reconsider their decisions.
  4. If you have at least 3,000 reputation points, vote to reopen yourself.

Now, the first problem here is... This was your flag:

Please reopen this question; it shouldn't be on hold. The question is clear and on-topic.

That's... Not very detailed. Your argument appears to be that the close reason doesn't apply, so let's quote the close reason too:

"Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers.

Let's see...

  1. Question is seeking debugging help.
  2. Question does include desired behavior (computed size 16px).
  3. Question does include a specific problem (computed size 22px).
  4. Question DOES NOT INCLUDE CODE NECESSARY TO REPRODUCE THE PROBLEM.

Here's the code in the question:

<div id="content">
  <div class="stec">
    <p class="stec-layout-month-daycell-num">31</p>
  </div>
</div>

That's... Not enough to reproduce the problem.

Now... You might be able to synthesize a test case based on that screenshot, but so far no one has done so. Your edits - and your less-than-detailed justification for reopening in the flag - were insufficient.

There's another issue here too: suggestion #3 in the help center was sorta aimed at questions that a moderator had closed; this is hinted at by the "moderators do reconsider their decisions" bit, but not very explicit; I should probably edit that.

  • Yeah, sorry about that. I jumped on George's comment regarding the missing CSS and just added a stack-snippet. Now, the flag description wasn't very detailed because I hoped that the edits had made the question clear enough to stand on its own merit... and, failing that, a mod would see my comments, the edit history, etc. Another important lesson in expected perception, I guess. Thanks for the response (and reopening the question), Shog. The OP may never come back but others might. – canon Dec 2 '16 at 21:08
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    And if they do, the question now provides an example of how to include a succinct test case. Something we could certainly use a lot more of. – Shog9 Dec 2 '16 at 21:14
2

If you think a question should be reopened, then vote to reopen it. If the community feels that it merits reopening, it can be reopened. The community is more than capable of dealing with the situation, if the question does in fact merit reopening. You should only be flagging for moderator attention when there is a problem that community moderation isn't able to solve.

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    I have no trust in the community in this instance. :/ – canon Dec 2 '16 at 20:29
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    @canon well that doesn't change how the system behaves. Diamond mods don't really get involved in stuff like that that the community can handle. :/ – Patrice Dec 2 '16 at 20:32
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    Then they should really remove "flag for moderator attention" as one of the options in the Help Center. So, when the community fails, that's final. Great. – canon Dec 2 '16 at 20:34
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    @canon there are things the community CANNOT handle. These are when you should flag for moderator attention. If it's a matter of "I'm right, the community is wrong", most of the time you'll have to convince people.... – Patrice Dec 2 '16 at 20:41
  • So, there's an imporant distinction between "cannot handle" and "fail to handle"? :/ – canon Dec 2 '16 at 20:44
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    @canon to be fair at least eight different users voted to close or leave closed (5 to close + 3 in the queue) - the consensus seems to be that the question is indeed not that great... – Aurora0001 Dec 2 '16 at 20:45
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    @canon here, it seems like you are just disagreeing with the community. It's not a "fail to handle", it's a "people are disagreeing with you". You need to be convincing I guess... – Patrice Dec 2 '16 at 20:56
  • @Patrice that's fair. In my frustration I overlooked my own failure. – canon Dec 3 '16 at 1:46
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    @canon and imean i can guess it's frustrating when you are trying to make the site a better place and it feels as if the community who would benefit from your actions is fighting you. However... Trying to force the systemto work the way you want is never likely to produce a good outcome:/. But yeah I can definitely empathize with the frustration – Patrice Dec 3 '16 at 1:52

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