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After taking some time to go through the review queue every day or two I saw that the button Requires Editing is actually for other members of the community and not for the OP himself.
That in mind what to do about questions that are interesting but lacking code, additional information?

I somewhat feel bad immediately flagging the question and to do that for almost every question there without code.
I also did not want to skip it as this problem would then land at another person.

So question is: What to do about questions, leaking code or additional information? An opportunity for a new button like Give it time or am I actually supposed to use the daily flags I got for the review queue?

If I misunderstood feel free to tell me so!

Somewhat related question and the accordingly marked answer tells to not use Requires Editing as other cannot provide the code that the problems are possibly in.

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    That is what "unsalvageable" is for. It really means "unsalvageable by the community". If only the OP can salvage it, choose unsalvageable. Questions can always be reopened after they've been closed, and the most helpful thing you can do for the OP in these cases is to close it as off-topic for the correct reason. This provides the OP with the information necessary to fix their question, or at the very least tells them why questions like theirs are not allowed here if even the OP cannot edit it to be on-topic. – Tiny Giant Nov 29 '16 at 7:15
  • So flagging is actually the supposed operation for such cases? That seems harsh but understandable especially with the background of reopening. Feel free to add this as an answer! – geisterfurz007 Nov 29 '16 at 7:18
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    The answer below is sufficient, as well as I'm sure this is covered elsewhere and will probably be closed as a duplicate. As a side note, only debugging questions explicitly require code. A question may be too broad or off-topic for other reasons if it does not include code, but you should not be closing every question that does not include code solely for that reason. It is up to you to make sure that the OP gets the information necessary to correct their mistake, you do this by selecting the most appropriate close reason. – Tiny Giant Nov 29 '16 at 7:22
  • Yup it was almost immediately posted after my comment. I thought so as well but could not find something on the quick side except the linked question... And IMO especially for batch where scripts are not that long, commands that have been tried should definitely go into the question as well. That I should not flag everything is clear, but one- or two-liners asking for help on a certain program should include what they have tried so far. – geisterfurz007 Nov 29 '16 at 7:27
  • Research effort and usefulness are measured by post score, on-topicness is measured by closure and deletion states. Questions that show a lack of research effort or usefulness should be downvoted, but that alone does not make them off topic. Just make sure that you read and understand the close reasons before applying them to a post, think about how that information will help them get an answer, not necessarily make the question useful, and you should be fine. There are thousands of posts in the close vote queue, not enough reviewers to review them all, and false positives exacerbate the issue – Tiny Giant Nov 29 '16 at 8:04
  • May I ask: why the downvotes? – geisterfurz007 Nov 29 '16 at 10:52
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Thats what "unsalvageable" is for. Triage is only there to determine if something is generally OK, if it needs attention from other unrelated users, or if it needs attention from OP to become OK. (Unsalvageable).

Generally, unsalvageable results in close (the option makes you close vote / flag), and questions that need further attention from OP should be closed. If OP edits them into shape, they can easily be reopened (there's a queue for that, too).

I somewhat feel bad immediately flagging the question and to do that for almost every question there without code.

Don't feel bad about that, it's part of the game. If OP decides to step up and make a proper question out of it, it can always just be reopened.

You're right though in that you shouldn't use "requires editing" in such cases, as "requires editing" is only for cases that other unrelated users could fix (not OP).

  • Well then! Thanks for the closer look on that. It was just somewhat weird for me to go through the queue and basically mass flag... But if that is intended! Your mark will appear in around three minutes :) – geisterfurz007 Nov 29 '16 at 7:22
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    @geisterfurz007 Well, thats what the queue is for, basicly. It gives questions a look to categorize them. As it happens, the criteria that picks what to put in there results in lots of tosh being put in there, so it's normal that you use many flags in that. – Magisch Nov 29 '16 at 7:24
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    Keypoint: Don't feel bad about that, after all posts don't have feelings. – rene Nov 29 '16 at 8:04
  • @rene Well they do not but the users might have ;) – geisterfurz007 Nov 29 '16 at 8:44
  • @geisterfurz007 we don't care about users. The licence under which they post their content makes that they no longer own it. If they feel emotionally attached to it they should have posted it somewhere else. We moderate content here, not the emotions of users. We have more then enough work from the content posted. – rene Nov 29 '16 at 8:47
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    @rene we do care about users. – Aaron Hall Nov 29 '16 at 15:27
  • Also, to be pedantic, although the license to the site is irrevocable (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/18221/…) they still own the content, and so they can do whatever they want with it off-site. – Aaron Hall Nov 29 '16 at 15:51
  • @AaronHall sure, I don't care about users. – rene Nov 29 '16 at 18:14

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