1

In the past couple of months I've had 6 of my questions get a net negative score. So I figure it's time to seek the reason for that.

I've gone over these questions now, and the only one I can understand is the first in the following list - since it seems to be a simple mistake (Though I think I'm not the only one who might make this mistake so it might be useful for others). The others, on the other hand - baffle me.

So - please explain what's wrong with my questions. I'm not saying there's nothing wrong with them. I'm saying I don't see what's wrong. Is it the subject? Not enough details? Not clear enough?

Please go easy on the Meta effect. You do want people asking how to improve their questions, right?

  1. How to get IBackgroundTaskInstance?
  2. How to 'Name' a BitmapImage
  3. Keep space for arrays/buffers for repeated use
  4. Decode image to low resolution but keep original number of pixels?
  5. Can WriteableBitmap only be written-to once?
  6. Get file paths for files in Centennial app
  • 13
    I just took a quick peek at those: You don't seem to be a fan of providing code in your questions. For a site focused on coding problems don't you think that is strange? – rene Nov 28 '16 at 20:50
  • @rene I hear you. But I can't really see any code that would help (except in #5 where I did post the pertinent code). If someone knows enough to answer - they don't need code for any of these. If they don't know enough - Why are they voting on a subject they are not proficient in? – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 20:56
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    Don't assume I know nothing about a subject. You can be sure my votes are sane. – rene Nov 28 '16 at 21:02
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    Some of the questions ask for concepts; others ask for concretions. In the concrete questions, code would be helpful to further illustrate difficulties, but the concepts are a lot trickier since they're subjectively okay based on how familiar one is with the subject matter. For instance, if this particular question were asked with a Java context instead of C#, I doubt I'd have an issue with it...but that's really up to the people monitoring/watching the C# tag to decide. – Makoto Nov 28 '16 at 21:04
  • @rene I wasn't referring to you. I was referring to someone who, say, downvotes stackoverflow.com/questions/40705816/how-to-name-a-bitmapimage because he doesn't recognize Name as being a common property for controls. – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 21:04
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    But in all honesty, getting in a huff about these downvotes isn't constructive and will likely invite more downvotes since now more people are looking at your questions and voting more critically of them. The best thing you can do is read up on what to do when someone downvotes your question. – Makoto Nov 28 '16 at 21:05
  • #6 is a bit too concise for my taste. #4 seems irrational, or possibly an X-Y problem ("Yes you can decode, and store only 1 in every 10 pixels. But you still need to decode them.") Ooh but the good part is, I like #3. – usr2564301 Nov 28 '16 at 21:07
  • @Makoto a) Thanks. b) About your second comment - It took several months. I just want to be able to ask without knowing I will probably get downvoted. But thanks. Your point is well received. As for your first comment. I didn't understand what you meant exactly by the concepts are a lot trickier since they're subjectively okay based on how familiar one is with the subject matter. – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 21:10
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    What I meant was, I personally would be alright with these if I were more familiar with the subject material. Truth be told, in regards to a question like this, I'd like to see some of the code you had written, but as a concept in and of itself, it's not terribly broad. It might be considered overly broad now because it's asking a lot, but I could see how this question could be good. – Makoto Nov 28 '16 at 21:12
  • @RadLexus Thanks! That's exactly the type of feedback I was looking for! (About #4 - see the comment there that shows it can be done) – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 21:14
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    @RadLexus: And that's the point I wanted to make. It can be an objectively acceptable question for someone who understands the subject matter. Saying, "You're doing this wrong!" is still an answer so long as it's well-rationalized. – Makoto Nov 28 '16 at 21:15
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    That first question's first comment explains why it's downvoted. "I was trying to do this"? Really? You couldn't take the time to type even the name of the function you were calling? The fact that you were completely dismissive of that commenter's reason does not mean they were wrong. Also, you don't provide any background as to why you need to call that function or anything else. Luckily Cody Gray was able to divine your intentions. – Heretic Monkey Nov 28 '16 at 21:25
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    We have so many comments now, anyone for a CW answer? – rene Nov 28 '16 at 21:30
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    @rene I'd support that. – Nissa Nov 28 '16 at 21:43
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    @ispiro Not if they can't get to MSDN or that link goes stale. – Heretic Monkey Nov 28 '16 at 22:00
5

Below you'll find the comments that are made on the question by various authors

rene:

I just took a quick peek at those: You don't seem to be a fan of providing code in your questions. For a site focused on coding problems don't you think that is strange?

Makoto:

Some of the questions ask for concepts; others ask for concretions. In the concrete questions, code would be helpful to further illustrate difficulties, but the concepts are a lot trickier since they're subjectively okay based on how familiar one is with the subject matter. For instance, if this particular question were asked with a Java context instead of C#, I doubt I'd have an issue with it...but that's really up to the people monitoring/watching the C# tag to decide

I personally would be alright with these if I were more familiar with the subject material. Truth be told, in regards to a question like this, I'd like to see some of the code you had written, but as a concept in and of itself, it's not terribly broad. It might be considered overly broad now because it's asking a lot, but I could see how this question could be good

Rad Lexus:

#6 is a bit too concise for my taste. #4 seems irrational, or possibly an X-Y problem ("Yes you can decode, and store only 1 in every 10 pixels. But you still need to decode them.") Ooh but the good part is, I like #3

Mike McCaughan:

That first question's first comment explains why it's downvoted. "I was trying to do this"? Really? You couldn't take the time to type even the name of the function you were calling? The fact that you were completely dismissive of that commenter's reason does not mean they were wrong. Also, you don't provide any background as to why you need to call that function or anything else. Luckily Cody Gray was able to divine your intentions.

Steve:

too concise. In 3 and 4 your terseness makes your question hard to understand. In 1 and 6 you reference information without summarizing it -- which is annoying. If at all possible, include code (#5 has code and wasn't downvoted!). Help the reader with context as in #2 you are talking xaml but one might think you're asking about .net/c#. So, in general, add more, relevant information. Think about being nice to the reader of your question. Ask yourself: what would they want? Usually, this is the same that you would want if you were the reader.

3

Your posts aren't too concise - They simply do not provide enough information or information in a readable enough way.

One links to code off-site. Don't do that. Provide a minimal complete verifiable example.

See the mousover text for the downbutton. It says:

This question does not show any research effort.

I think your downvoters feel like you're not making enough effort.

I theorize that a few things will cause voters to upvote your question.

  1. Get a good answer. Good answers attract readers, and some will thank you for simply asking the question. You could rely on luck, but I'd suggest doing more.
  2. Educate the reader. Assume most readers won't know as much as you, but you'd like to get them up to speed to set them up to better understand the answer.
  3. Provide some code that demonstrates some effort made in the direction of your goal. If you think you have a concept that sheds light on the answer, provide it. It may be a misconception, but if it elicits a good answer, you'll ride those coattails.
  4. Make your words more accessible. Instead of one or two large paragraphs, take each sentence's idea, make it its own short paragraph, and break it into short bite-sized sentences.

All of these things require effort - effort that you were not demonstrably making. You'll probably be rewarded for making more of an effort. And the vice-versa.

  • 1
    I'm not defending my questions. But I also disagree with some of this answer. A verifiable example is simply irrelevant in these cases. As for the individual points - 1) Good point, though the first one has a very good answer. Didn't help much. 2) Agreed. 3) Agreed. (Though in these cases I think it is a misconception) 4) Agreed. All of these things require effort - effort that you were not making - absolutely not! I spent a lot of time trying to solve all of these, and writing the questions as clear as I could. For me - my questions seem clearer than if I had added to them. (1/2) – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 22:31
  • You are correct, however, that my audience disagrees. (2/2). And by the way, thanks for the answer. – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 22:32
  • I noticed the edit. Thanks. – ispiro Nov 28 '16 at 22:35
  • @Aaron: I find your wording argumentative and exaggerated -- not respectful. For one, some of the questions are too concise -- like the ones with links ... I think sometimes people are too quick to respond emotionally ... to questions that are not written well ... and anything that irks them. I do it too! But, we all should try to do better. ispiro is humbly asking the community for help. We should respect his effort. – steve Nov 29 '16 at 20:34
  • @steve I'm sorry it seems disrespectful, but I'm trying to provide insight to his voters point of view, while attempting to be at least nominally objective. I want ispiro to have success on the site. Asking questions that are readily accepted on the site is not easy. I encourage you to write your own full answer, and downvote mine if you find it unuseful. – Aaron Hall Nov 29 '16 at 21:16

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