-14

Yes, they have stats and nomination profiles and I can research what they'd done in the past, but stats don't draw the whole pictures and most candidates have good stats. Nomination profiles are kind of OK, but they don't tell everything. And research is hard. If I don't have the time to do research - I probably shouldn't vote, but I'm also not sure if I could do the research in reasonable time.

Could we have a debate among the candidates where they would discuss different questions posed by each other, the voters and the incumbents? It would be a lot easier to choose then.

I'd like to pick a candidate who's more helpful and kind to new users. I've seen too many cases where people close your questions either without stating a cause or with a highly debatable cause on a high value question. I'd like to vote, but I'd hate to accidentally vote on someone who's overly rigid on rules process and not focus enough on the spirit of the community.

  • 5
    Something like this? – Turamarth Nov 14 '16 at 20:42
  • 2
    Or for more debate style, you can simply read through the comments on their nomination. People with concerns over the suitability of a candidate, or simply questions as to their positions on various topics will have been able to ask them there. – Servy Nov 14 '16 at 20:43
  • 5
    You have the Election Questionnaire here on Meta, there's also the Election Chat Room, both linked from the election page. In the nomination phase there are comments below each nomination that you can look at by selecting the "nomination" tab on the election page. Do these not help at all? If not, you should add that to your question and explain why. – Kendra Nov 14 '16 at 20:44
  • Something similar to this has been done before. The questionnaire replaced the Town Hall chat. – HDE 226868 Nov 14 '16 at 20:44
  • 1
    "Could we have a debate among the candidates where they would discuss different questions posed by each other, the voters and the incumbents?" Yeah, a youtube livestream please. Sponsored by FOX News. – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 14 '16 at 20:47
  • 27
    "I'd like to pick a candidate who's more helpful and kind to new users." That's not their primary job. – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 14 '16 at 20:48
  • 5
    "and not focus enough on the spirit of the community" Could you explain that in more depth please? Being rigid of rules is the only way to save the site from decaying into a indefinite slurry mush of sunken VLQ questions and answers. – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 14 '16 at 20:51
  • To me, the most important metric besides the participation stats is candidates' comments. Pick a couple of samples - a couple of pages worth - from a day ago, a couple of weeks ago, a couple of years ago. That'll tell you more about how the candidate interacts with community members (and what kinds of things they pay the most attention to) than any debate. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Nov 14 '16 at 21:01
  • Regular participants of Meta will recognize their names and know their stances on lots of popular topics, as well as how they more casually interact on amore personal basis with once-off visitors who come here with a question they find important enough to raise. – usr2564301 Nov 14 '16 at 21:16
  • 2
    @πάνταῥεῖ Though it's not their 'primary job', everyone is allowed to vote for their own reasons. That's the whole point of elections, you know. If it weren't, we could just skip the election phase and elect moderates based on objective measures. – Rob Nov 15 '16 at 2:03
  • @Rob Yep, you can vote (or not) any way you like, for whichever reason you wish. But if you (or anyone) focuses on wrong qualities we may end up selecting bad moderator. Just as you can select wrong person for president if you focus on how good golfer he/she is and not on how good president he/she might be. – Dalija Prasnikar Nov 15 '16 at 8:14
  • @DalijaPrasnikar That entirely depends on what you define as 'wrong'. Clearly in the absurd case of voting for someone based on golfing abilities, it doesn't make sense. But it's very reasonable to want a representative of a site you like to be friendly and helpful to new comers, even if they aren't required to be – Rob Nov 15 '16 at 8:17
  • 1
    @Rob I get your point. It is reasonable to have moderator that is friendly, helpful and fair. Someone you can respect. It would be hard on all if moderators would behave any other way. My point is, first definition of what nice is varies greatly between people - some will say that you are not nice if you close and/or delete bad questions, and second if being nice is only quality moderator has, then he can be very bad in his moderating job. I don't want such moderators no matter how nice they are. – Dalija Prasnikar Nov 15 '16 at 8:30
  • I've just seen so many cases when a question gets closed when it's format is maybe not formally within the realm of acceptable Stack Overflow questions, but is a very useful question to have answers for and a question many people might ask. I've also seen people come in here for the first time and ask a question in a slightly wrong way. There are many ways to deal with these cases - some people just close it and maybe indicate why, while some others will help guide the newcomer to how to improve the question or how and where otherwise to find the answer. – Filip Skakun Nov 15 '16 at 16:09
  • The point I'm trying to make is - I don't like the behavior of the former and if you behave like that as a user - I am not sure I'd like you as a moderator. I get that moderation is tough and keeping the conversation civil requires establishing some rules, but I'm more of a "spirit of the law" than a "letter of the law" person. As long as you're honestly looking for help or trying to help and not posting junk - you're welcome here and deserve to be part of the community. We should help people fit in rather than punish them. – Filip Skakun Nov 15 '16 at 16:13
12

First of all, be sure that your expectations of moderators are in line with what moderators actually are, especially considering that the bulk of moderation on Stack Overflow is done by community members like yourself with sufficient reputation.

Second, note that debates have been done before to the tune of "Town Hall" chats, but this was deprecated in favor of a questionnaire. I'm not certain as to the reasons why, but one that comes to mind is that not everyone can make it to the Town Hall at the same time, as time zones are very much a thing, which would preclude many from both participating and partaking.

Finally...

I've seen too many cases where people close your questions either without stating a cause or with a highly debatable cause on a high value question. I'd like to vote, but I'd hate to accidentally vote on someone who's overly rigid on rules process and not focus enough on the spirit of the community.

This is something that we as the community can address anyway with our reopen votes, or discuss if the community as a whole felt like that the closure was justified, and explain/rationalize why. Being kind and being reasonable are different things, and while we can be kind when moderating, we have to be reasonable, too.

But, if you're really nervous about it, you can check out the candidate's stats and audit their actions for yourself, as well as read up on their responses to some of our questions for moderators.

Above all, don't vote if you're uncomfortable to. There's no sense in putting support behind a candidate that you don't agree with.

  • 6
    Big problem with the THCs was that most folks just read the meta posts generated from the transcripts... And by the time we could schedule them, hold them, and generate the meta posts, the election would be well underway already. The hope is that by getting the Q&A out early, folks may actually be able to read the answers. – Shog9 Nov 14 '16 at 21:19

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .