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In connection with the moderator elections, we are holding a Q&A thread for the candidates. Questions collected from an earlier thread have been compiled into this one, which shall now serve as the space for the candidates to provide their answers. Not every question was compiled. We elected to select 9 questions from the community, under the idea that 8th and 9th place were pretty close in score and both were nice questions. Also includes 2 pre-set questions from us... which were supposed to have actually been visibly posted on the question collection post but were apparently missing. They'll be the last two in the list as a result.

As a candidate, your job is simple - post an answer to this question, citing each of the questions and then post your answer to each question given in that same answer. For your convenience, I will include all of the questions in quote format with a break in between each, suitable for you to insert your answers. Just copy the whole thing after the first set of three dashes. Please consider putting your name at the top of your post so that readers will know who you are before they finish reading everything you have written, and also including a link to your answer on your nomination post.

Once all the answers have been compiled, this will serve as a transcript for voters to view the thoughts of their candidates, and will be appropriately linked in the Election page.

Good luck to all of the candidates!

Oh, and when you've completed your answer, please provide a link to it after this blurb here, before that set of three dashes. Please leave the list of links in the order of submission.

To save scrolling here are links to the submissions from each candidate (in order of submission, i.e. most recent comes last):


  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

  2. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

  3. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

  4. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

  5. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

  6. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

  7. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

  8. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

  9. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

  10. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

  11. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

  • 16
    Aren't questions 1 and 10 mostly the same? – yellowantphil Nov 7 '16 at 20:15
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    @yellowantphil shh that's part of the test – Machavity Nov 7 '16 at 20:20
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    I can't stand how the answers have been formatted, with each list item in a blockquote and the answer being misaligned from the question. Personally I'd either get rid of the list numbers altogether, or move each list number out of the blockquote and make the answer part of the list item. – BoltClock Nov 8 '16 at 5:33
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    @BoltClock: I'm glad I'm not the only one that gets a bit obsessive about proper blockquote/list nesting. – Nathan Tuggy Nov 8 '16 at 8:04
  • Can I answer these questions even though I'm not going to nominate myself? – dorukayhan Nov 8 '16 at 15:22
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    @dorukayhan We'd like to keep the answers here focused on the people running in the election. – Undo Nov 8 '16 at 15:38
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    @BoltClock at least they didn't use code formatting for emphasis. – JAL Nov 8 '16 at 16:43
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    @JAL you mean code formatting for emphasis? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Nov 10 '16 at 5:15
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    @AJ That wasn't a typo - it was a deliberate misspelling... – Jon Clements Nov 10 '16 at 13:12
  • Why don't you add a question like "How would you take the election result, if it is unfavourable to you?" – Nagaraja Thangavelu Nov 14 '16 at 3:01
  • @Naga2Raja you could have participated in the earlier meta post linked above, while the possible questions were still being compiled and voted upon. However, you can still go ahead and ask each candidate in the comments. – Samuel Liew Nov 14 '16 at 4:01
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    Can we get rid of a moderator? – Rocco The Taco Nov 14 '16 at 22:01
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    This election needs an electoral college. The masses can't be trusted. – canon Nov 17 '16 at 21:45
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    i will vote only a person who aims to disable "downvoting without comments" – Victor Nov 18 '16 at 21:39
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    @Victor Yes, It is very important , when you disvote , you should tell your reason for disvoting . – user3383267 Nov 19 '16 at 11:18

10 Answers 10

287

I'm Andy, and these are my answers (and here is my nomination post). I've tried to keep most of them short but informative. I know there will be a lot of text for everyone to read as more nominations come in.


  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

No one has an exemption from the Be Nice policy. I think the first step is to understand why nothing has already been done about the user. 4-5 a day seems like the user has moved beyond the "nuisance" stage. I think a temporary ban is appropriate, with another explanation as to what is expected when interacting with others. While some users are more sensitive than others, a stream of this many flags across an extended period of time doesn't lead me to believe the problem is with the community users.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

There is a process for both sides - community and moderator - to deal with these types of decisions. Meta is useful for airing these discussions. It's also a good place to politely educate a moderator in the ways they are wrong... or a moderator to educate the community in the policies they were following. Sometimes these policies aren't known by everyone. Sometimes they've evolved over time to mean something else. In either case, the discussion needs to take place.

The fact that this takes place in a chat room doesn't change the answer. Chat happens at a faster pace than meta. My goal when I've been involved in chat rooms is to engage in a discussion. If both sides can keep the discussion civil (and this does not mean that you have to agree with me or that I have to agree with you), I'll happily explain decisions that were made in chat.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

Yes, I'll be able to effectively moderate. I disagree with guidelines at work, yet can effectively perform my job. I disagree with guidelines on Stack Overflow and can already effectively use tools I have at my disposal - downvotes, close votes, meta posts - to perform community moderation tasks. As a moderator, I will be able to moderate the same way.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

I do not delete the question. Unfortunately, for the poster, by posting the question they licensed it to Stack Exchange under the CC-SA. However, I will explain that they do have a few options. Option 1 is to request disassociation from the specific post that may get them in trouble. This removes their name from the post. Option 2 is to change code in the specific post to something more generic that still exhibits the problem the question is focused on. A combination of these two options may be appropriate as well. In rare cases, it's appropriate to ask for the original revision to be deleted.

If the question and answers are not good (i.e. everything is down voted), I'm more willing to remove the entire post from the site. I do not like the idea of removing multiple good answers simply because someone didn't realize they can't post proprietary code on a public web site.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

Not an answer (NAA) are for answers asking new questions, providing one line of troubleshooting help, or posting a link to another site with the note that "this tutorial helped." Very Low Quality (VLQ) answers are posts like "You should look at fancyMethod" (maybe with a working link to fancyMethod). Technically, if the user squints or spends enough time reading the linked documentation, it does answer the question. But... it sucks as an answer. This is different than "try this tutorial", because it contains just enough information to be slightly helpful.

NAA flags should be acted on by deleting the answer. Very low quality takes a little bit more brain power. Theoretically, it could be corrected. But if the post has existed for months and is lingering at a zero score or lower (especially when there are upvoted, competing answers), I think it can be safely deleted. If the post is newer, I'm more likely to downvote and comment.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

I have participated in the Smoke Detector/Charcoal community spam detection project for a couple of years. I've seen spam, inappropriate content, and questionable content from my work machine behind a corporate firewall countless times. It has yet to tell me that I'm a horrible person.

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

I have two answers for this question, based on the user's history. If this is a first offense, up to this point the user hasn't been pushing limits and attempting to disrupt others, and the ban isn't related to voting fraud, then I'd be willing to remove the ban. Sometimes a ban is put in place to get the user's attention. Once the situation has been resolved, the ban is no longer appropriate and should be removed.

On the other hand, if the user has a history of crossing the line and looking for a reaction, or if the ban is related to vote fraud, I'd simply not reply and the user will return in a week. Stack Overflow has enough "voting irregularity" bans that I imagine the responses to such bans are all similar (and invalid). I see no reason to change that policy.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I'm proud of many of my posts on Meta.SO and around the network. Here on MSO, two that I am particularly proud of are:

In both of these, you can see that I care about quality on Stack Overflow. I've spent time analyzing the problem, as I see it, and present my findings to the community. I participated in the discussions that both posts generated.

Elsewhere on the network, my participation in meta has helped to shape communities. For example, on Hardware Recommendations, my meta post about "What type of hardware is allowed" helped to set the scope of what the community accepts as on topic hardware. I've also helped to set up the high quality guidelines for questions and argued against certain types of tags and hardware.

With all of these, I've presented my arguments and logic and strived to remain professional. I believe the community on HardwareRecs has seen that as well.

As a moderator on Community Building, I've been involved in many discussions. I was involved in the discussions to rename the community from Moderators.SE to CommunityBuilding.SE. I've been involved in discussions about slow growth of the community. I've also presented arguments that go against other moderators, and walked away still feeling like a moderation team.

On Open Source, I made a post about how moderators had implemented a policy to watch the reviewers. It was similar to the long removed "flag weight" option that used to exist. I believe the post was presented in a way that questioned the decisions of the moderators, yet remained professional.

Through these meta posts across the network, I think you can pick up on my moderation style and personality. I like data and I try to present my thoughts in a way that is understandable to all. I'm also willing to speak my mind, but want to work with those involved as we try to solve the problem.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This is a two step process, but I don't know if the community would ever see any of my actions. The first step would be to get a second/third/forth opinion from other moderators. Am I doing something wrong? If so, I'd need to adjust what I was doing. Assuming it's required, I'd also apologize to the user and explain what I'd be changing in the future. However, if the other moderators don't think I'm doing anything wrong, we move to the next step. Stack Overflow has many moderators and they don't work in isolation. To avoid a conflict of interest, I'd request another moderator handle the response to the user.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

No one has an exemption from the Be Nice policy. The posts are valued but the behavior isn't. I'd encourage the user to adjust the behavior. If this doesn't work (or hasn't worked repeatedly over a period of time), then a series of escalating bans - which is the common policy - would take place. With these bans, a mod message explaining that their behavior isn't acceptable would be sent, regardless of the quality of their posts. While it's unfortunate to lose a user that has contributed good content, if they are driving away other users with their behavior, it makes sense to eliminate the problem. A toxic atmosphere of abusive comments should not be something a user of any level of experience has to deal with.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

There is only one way to handle this: talk with the other mod. I'm certainly not a mind reader and I'm guessing they aren't either. I'll take a few minutes to talk with them about my concerns, listen to their reasoning and, I imagine, we'll come to some kind of agreement on what to do with the post.

  • it's appropriate to ask for the original revision to be deleted - mods cannot delete a revision, but they can edit it. The edit then has to be approved by another mod. Besides that, I like your approach to question 4. :) – Nick Volynkin Nov 8 '16 at 6:09
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    If this is a first offense... I'd be willing to remove the ban - I stongly advice you against doing so because 1. this breaks the equality of consequences (some other user might do the same and yet spend the whole week in suspension) 2. this makes the user feel like their behaviour was not a real trouble; – Nick Volynkin Nov 8 '16 at 6:48
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    3. for their next issue (if it happens) they get a 30-day suspension, which is kind of a surprize, when the first one lasted for an hour; 4. this can make the user feel like the mod actually made a mistake by suspending them, but later realized the mistake and removed the suspension. And that's what they'll be able to tell everybody about the whole situation. – Nick Volynkin Nov 8 '16 at 6:50
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    1. "I think a temporary ban is appropriate, with another explanation as to what is expected when interacting with others." - to me this reads like an inappropriate escalation and knee-jerk decision making. I could see an incredibly productive user making lots of short, constructive comments every day, and due to the number of them and perhaps a bit of inelegance in communication, getting that number of flags. A suspension, to me, seems a poor response. Perhaps a bit of communication on your part could make for a better outcome for everyone. – Aaron Hall Nov 8 '16 at 12:48
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    @NickVolynkin, I am going to disagree with the unwillingness to remove the ban. SO Moderators have done so on previous occassions after talking with the users. Sometimes it's been because of faults on the user others on the moderator, but the idea is to make sure the user has understood the actions have consequences. I'm not saying every "I'm sorry..." gets out of the ban, but there are times when compassion is ok – Andy Nov 8 '16 at 13:44
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    @AaronHall, I think the point here is that the user has a history of rudeness. I don't think that's a knee-jerk reaction. I think that is finally forcing the user to confront how they are interacting with the community. – Andy Nov 8 '16 at 13:46
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    @NickVolynkin, Finishing my thought - If the user performs the same action again and gets a 30 day suspension...that falls entirely on them. They were banned, apologized and said they wouldn't do it again and then abused the trust the moderator (me) gave them. By abusing the trust, they've lost all good will they had. In such a case, yes I would have made a mistake, but the system reacted correctly. The next suspension is increased. If the user can't learn and abuses a bit of trust, then the compassion I mentioned earlier is not going to be available and both sides learned something. – Andy Nov 8 '16 at 13:56
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    @Andy I think that you may not need to force the user - by interacting with the user, you may not need to escalate to banning. And you are skipping that step in the process. You shouldn't ban first, and then communicate later, unless behavior is definitively over the line - and here it explicitly isn't. – Aaron Hall Nov 8 '16 at 14:03
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    @AaronHall, You aren't wrong that communication is good. But, in this scenario, it sounds like private communications have already not worked. A short suspension, while continuing to communicate, changes the situation a bit. Instead of talking to the moderator and then going to continue the behavior generating flags, the suspension puts a temporary stop to the behavior and allows the user to focus on what the moderator is saying. – Andy Nov 8 '16 at 14:08
  • Instead of taking the time to communicate, you'd rather humiliate an otherwise strongly contributing user by banning them? I think you'll achieve better outcomes for everyone by fully communicating the gravity of the issue (which the prior communication obviously has not done), before escalating to a ban. – Aaron Hall Nov 8 '16 at 14:25
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    "Humiliate" is not the word I'd use. "Educate". I trust that the gravity of the issue has been communicated previously. The moderator templates in the mod messages make it clear that behavior isn't ok. The key to my answer has to do with the history of the user. 4-5 flags a day is not ok. I'm not banning a user on their first rude comment flag. I'm banning them after a lot of rude comment flags and after communicating with them has failed. With that ban comes a mod message explaining - again - the reason for the ban. – Andy Nov 8 '16 at 14:31
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    I think @Aaron and Nick just put too much weight on the notion of a ban/suspension. I got a suspension for something. It was the right thing to do to quickly get my attention at minimal cost to the moderators (whose time I don't want to waste) and not "humiliating." I understood why the suspension was triggered, explained my reasoning (which I realized was flawed) and that I would stop. The mod lifted the suspension and I wrote one of my top answers that day. It all turned out fine -- no big deal. Others in the R tag have been suspended for various reasons with no real stigma or anger either. – Frank Nov 8 '16 at 15:12
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    @NickVolynkin, I think we are going to disagree on this point. There are times when I believe a ban can be lifted early. I don't believe every ban can be and I don't believe every offense lends a user to being unbanned early. I provided some examples of when it's happened before. – Andy Nov 10 '16 at 5:46
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    @Andy you got my Vote (100th) , Some answers are impressive , Looking forward to see as MOD !! – Webruster Nov 10 '16 at 10:28
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    Andy, your dedication to Quality Assurance and the tools you built for this purpose are truly impressive, analytical and (imo) a huge step for improving and cleaning up lower quality content. I'd be very glad having you as a moderator, though I must add, excessively analytical based decisions may upset more "emotional" based decision users. Your #9 answer gives me the confidence that you'd know when to delegate decisions to other moderators that may rely less on analytical analysis. – CPHPython Nov 10 '16 at 12:14
159

I'm David, and these are my answers:

  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

Since from the given description nobody's clearly in the wrong, this is a somewhat touchy-feely situation. What we certainly want to avoid is souring the general mood in the community. If the offender is noticeably contributing to a decline in "morale" around the site, it is important to step in. However, since they're not doing anything objectively wrong, there's no need or point in "punishing" them in any way. Keeping an open dialog to them and making them understand the consequences of their actions would be my preferred approach.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

Let the community judge the standing policies and my actions pertaining to them. If I can confidently say that I've acted in accordance to established consensus, it appears the consensus must have drifted somewhere and it's time to reevaluate standing practices. I'd open a topic on Meta SO laying out the situation and inviting discussion.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

I've seen the policies evolve dramatically over the years, and I've seen the consequences of each change. I believe the status quo is a pretty well tweaked set of policies and the community mood is largely harmonious (I mean, I've seen much worse…). I'm completely on board with a) having policies, b) arriving at the right policy over time through community consensus and c) enacting the policies. There's no point in going rogue and ignoring policies; that's not a democratic community, that's anarchy.

Long story short: sure, I'd stick to the policies. If I disagree with a policy, there's a process to change it. Ignoring it is not helping anyone.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

It's none of our business what anyone's honour code is. A personal or institutional honour code is no excuse to poop all over our codes. The user is responsible themselves for sorting out their honour without trampling all over ours. The question gets locked to prevent further back and forth and/or the user gets a suspension, depending on how egregious their behaviour is exactly.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

Not-An-Answer is something which is not attempting to answer the question, e.g. an extension to the question (user mistakes SO's model for a forum thread) or entirely off-topic gibberish.

Very-Low-Quality is something which attempts to answer the question, but falls terribly short of meeting minimum quality requirements like coherent sentences, formatting or minimum useful content.

If a post has been flagged and thusly brought to a moderator's attention, I deal with it on its own merits; i.e. a NAA is still NAA even if flagged as VLQ. A single false flag is hardly worth worrying about. If the same user continuously raises false flags, it would be time to explain the difference to them.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

I have no issue with that. I'm responsible for my own machine and internet access, so there's no corporate hurdle either.

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

A ban is not something I'd deal out lightly to begin with; if I have reached the conclusion that it's the best course of action, then it's something I have to stick with. If any offender could simply weasel their way out of punishment by typing the right words into an email, the system would be pretty useless.

Does it show that I have two young kids…?

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I'll pick these:

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This somewhat goes back to answer 2. If said user is the one and only person having issues with my actions, I'll happily accept their feedback, but cannot bend over backwards to please them. If on the other hand the community at large is seconding the user's opinion, it appears I have areas to improve myself.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

This is rather similar to the first answer: if nobody is clearly in the wrong, there's little for a moderator to do except trying to moderate. If I see potential for improvement in the user's actions, I'll point them out. Divisive personalities aren't necessarily something anyone can do anything about; only if it clearly hurts the community is there a clear need to step in.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

That depends on whether that feeling is based on facts, or is merely an opinion. A clear misjudgement on the moderator's part (which can happen to anyone) should be rectified and the moderator notified; a mere difference of opinion is just that, and I won't lose much sleep over it.

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    +1 on #7. Very good. – anonymous2 Nov 10 '16 at 0:44
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    #7, the best answer from all and specially that line :) – Leo the lion Nov 10 '16 at 9:52
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    I was surprised (and a bit disappointed) you didn't get elected last time. Certainly a great candidate! – P.P. Nov 11 '16 at 10:20
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    @P.P. I mean, elections, right? What could possibly go wrong…? ;) – deceze Nov 11 '16 at 10:21
  • @deceze very timely remark O>O – Yvette Colomb Nov 11 '16 at 12:40
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    you will definitely win this time :) – Bhavin Nov 19 '16 at 5:03
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    @Bhavin If the primaries are any indication, I may be trumped at the last minute… 😉 – deceze Nov 19 '16 at 8:00
  • Personally, I don't like the response to #7. To use the term "offender" and "weasel" shows the individual may travel down the path of confrontation thank someone who would guided and help the user. Of course, this means if the poster is unwilling to negotiate then other means are warranted. – lordhog Nov 22 '16 at 1:39
  • @deceze. congratulations big bro. I told you na you will definitely win this time ;) – Bhavin Nov 22 '16 at 20:32
134

I'm Bhargav and these are my thoughts on the queries asked. I've tried to answer this after drinking a cup of coffee, so I hope that they are coherent.

  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

I believe that any action of moderation has an escalation procedure. The first task, as mentioned in the question, would be to inform them that they are rude. If they continue the next step would be to contact them in a private chat room and make them understand that their comments are not that suitable for a constructive site, like ours. Providing them examples of their flagged (and now deleted) comments and then informing them about other alternatives would be the best. (Yes, This is similar to our Kindergarten teachers). If the action does continue, then there's a special reason provided to pacify them. Yes, Suspending them "to cool down" would be the best way. It is at this point when the scores of answers that they have contributed is very insignificant compared to their attitude. And if they continue doing the same, We all know what's the last resort.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

Whenever there's a lot of users disagreeing to my point, It does suggest that I need to introspect my stand on that point. However, if I feel that my stance was 100% sure, then I'll try to make them understand my point of view. If they again disagree with that, I'd call in another moderator to review my stance. Moderators work as a team and if any one of the members are unsure, then the others would certainly chip in. In any case if the dispute still remains, I'd ask them to bring it out on meta.

If the ruling was in a chatroom, It's a bit harder as there are many more users who are aiming at you. The first would be to check if the users are following the CHAT FAQ and the Be Nice policy. (If they really did follow that, Then there would have been no troubles.). Secondly, I'll try to explain them again regarding my stance. Again, if the dispute is not solved, I'll add a full fledged answer to the meta post that would be made. (Yep, I'd follow the good example set by TheLostMind).

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

Yes, There are a few policies of Stack Exchange that I do disagree with. As an ardent follower of the Theory of Moderation and the Rules and Regulations of the site, I will certainly respect those rules and enforce them fully. However, One of the first tasks would be to ask the other moderators in the Lounge (Teacher's) about the particular rule. I might be able to either, Understand the idea and motivation behind that rule, thereby changing my stance, or inform the CMs that the rule isn't practical anymore and ask them for their views. In this way, I can wholeheartedly take decisions regarding that rule.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

Well, we all know that vandalism is not the right way to delete one's post and also there is no official moderator policy that mentions that we must delete a post based on the OP's request. One of the ways is to temporarily lock the post and wait for the dispute to be resolved. However this again is not a very good solution. Ultimately, it all comes down to the quality of the post. Is it worth to keep it and Would it be helpful to the future users? Then keep it. Speak to the user that it is not the right way and inform them about the correct way to dissociate a post. If they still continue, Then we might need to take stricter measures, like suspending them for Rule Violations.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

Star Wars vs Star Trek, Apple vs Microsoft, Coke vs Pespi, NAA vs VLQ

NAA and VLQ is one of the greatest debates. However, After the experiance of nearly 13,000 flags, I can safely state that.

NAA :

  • Asking new questions on as answers.
  • Asking clarifications as answers.
  • Trolls (like "Hehe, I don't know the answer").

VLQ :

  • Link only answers. (Yes this is the main debating point, but the mentions clearly that they are VLQs)
  • Non English posts that seem not rude/abusive. These posts have a scope of improvement that can be done by the post author alone but cannot be salvaged through mere editing.

I've created a small table to explain those flags that I'd like to decline.

Flag Type | Flagged As | Condition      | Action
------------------------------------------------------
NAA       | NAA        | Edited or not  | Helpful
VLQ/NAA   | VLQ        | Edited         | Auto helpful
VLQ       | NAA        | Not Edited     | Helpful
VLQ       | NAA        | Edited to be   |
          |            | made an answer | Declined

This just gives a rough idea, But the action does depend on the post in particular.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

Yes, There are no filters in my office that block adult content. It is not that risky, as I've watched Game of Thrones in one of the office systems (and the manager joined in too). Lastly, I work in a domains and registration department, fixing the DNS issues. Everyday I open numerous adult web sites, as a part of my work. (Don't ask me for a list of them, though ;) )

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

This depends a lot on the use case. If the user is a new user and has not been experienced with the rules (and not been warned before). Then yes, removing the ban would help. However if the user was already given multiple warnings, then I'd just reduce the length of the ban. If the user repeats the same offense again and again, then it's not worth to spend a time writing back a constructive reply. The user must be aware by now that such an attitude is not tolerated.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This is a tough question to me as most of the answers of mine on meta are support questions or feedback to SE community. However I do leave a lot of constructive comments asking for clarifications from the moderators so that it'd enhance my moderation abilities. (Few of my comments have become meta posts too). One of the meta post that I like is this where in which I clearly explained as to why Stack Overflow still receives a lot of NAAs. It does not demonstrate my moderation style, but does display my commitment to moderation.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Again, as I mentioned previously, If a user constantly finds some fault with me, then I'd like to introspect and find out as to why I am wrong. Similar to 2., I'd call in another moderator to review my stance. If that moderator also agrees with me, then I'd talk to that particular user in person and try to understand this strange behavior. If I feel that I'm at fault, I'll accept that and correct myself. If not, then I'll try my best to convince the other user that I'm following the SE rules, and explain those to them.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I'd like to slightly tweak an age old idiom, Rule is a Rule, even for a high rep user. Thanks to being a member of the SOBotics team that has designed the HEAT Detector, I've been spending a lot of time persuading users to lower their harsh tone and flagging those comments that are out right rude. The only way to deal with this situation is to 1. Speak to them and make them understand 2. If they don't reprimand them by suspending them 3. If they still don't extend the ban for a longer period. And again as I mentioned in 1., It's a fine line between being helpful and being rude. If a user steps beyond that point where he no longer seems helpful but rude, then it's better to stick to the Be Nice Policy.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Talk to them in the Lounge. Moderators are chosen after many many filters and are (assumed to be) level minded. I'll speak to them and clarify my queries. In this way, I'll confirm whether I was wrong or whether they have fat-fingered in that particular case.

  • 1
    What's that "year", @yellowantphil? I've only heard of decades. Joking apart, Yes, An extended ban. :) – Bhargav Rao Nov 7 '16 at 21:32
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    You only drank one cup of coffee? Clearly not moderator material! – slugster Nov 7 '16 at 23:48
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    @slugster Oops, It was 3 hrs past midnight and I had no one to help make another cup. :-( .... I promise that I'll be a good guy and drink more coffee. – Bhargav Rao Nov 8 '16 at 8:48
  • Non-English answers should be flagged as NAA, not VLQ; see How do I deal with non-English content? – Michał Perłakowski Nov 8 '16 at 15:51
  • 1
    @Gothdo, I had flagged a non English post as NAA, Few minutes later the OP edited it. Then I had a declined flag. That was the reason for my choice of putting NE as a VLQ flag. But as the faq mentions that, I'll accept that as the norm. Thanks for bring that to my notice, and I'm sorry for that part (I'll not edit my answer as it'd be wrong on my part to do so now.). – Bhargav Rao Nov 8 '16 at 16:02
  • @BhargavRao I asked one question but got deleted, any reason? – Leo the lion Nov 8 '16 at 18:15
  • I'm not sure, @Leo. Was the question closed as off-topic or any other reason? Do give me a screen shot of the deleted question, I'll help you understand why it might be deleted. :) – Bhargav Rao Nov 8 '16 at 18:17
  • 4
    @BhargavRao "I'll be a good guy and drink more coffee." You know my avatar ;). – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 9 '16 at 14:32
  • Oh Totally @πάνταῥεῖ, Your avatar is an inspiration to all of us :D – Bhargav Rao Nov 9 '16 at 14:39
  • 4
    " It does suggest that I need to introspect my stand on that point." great line there. But I've always known you to be a reasonable and level headed person on all fronts. – Yvette Colomb Nov 11 '16 at 13:06
  • 1
    Thank you for those kind words @YvetteColomb, :) – Bhargav Rao Nov 11 '16 at 13:06
  • What do you mean by this trick: Remember that this user rocks and I will always upvote them! ?? – haccks Nov 15 '16 at 20:10
  • 1
    @haccks It's just a small easter egg provided by Stack Exchange. All it does is, make people think as to why on earth would I always upvote them and then later realize that the URL always links to the logged in user. That's it. (And Nope, I dunno who all has clicked that to target them with upvotes ;) ...) – Bhargav Rao Nov 15 '16 at 20:12
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    It seem deceptive, specially when moderator election is going on. You know why! – haccks Nov 15 '16 at 20:20
  • Haha, I understood. It's always been there, Since 2 years. I'm a bit reluctant to remove it :( ... But as you've mentioned it, I'll remove it tomorrow as soon as I get up. :) ... I'll put it back after the elections are over! – Bhargav Rao Nov 15 '16 at 20:23
108

I'm Cerbrus, here's my nomination.
I'll be answering the questions here:

  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

It depends on if this user has a history of moderator intervention on this subject.
If the user has a record, I'm inclined to suspend the user (1 step longer than the previous one), with a clear message why the behaviour isn't tolerated.
If the user has a clean slate, I'd contact the user personally to give them a warning, first.

The user's reputation is irrelevant, in this case.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

First of all, I'd ask another moderator's opinion. For all I know, as sure as I am I'm right, I might still be wrong.

In my experience on chat, sometimes, a "group of users" like that try to pressure moderators in letting them go. When a different moderator also tells these users the ruling was correct, they usually "submit".

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

If it's policy, it's policy.
I may not agree with it, but that's how it works. I wouldn't have an issue moderating like that.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

Assuming the question was edited into shape, I'd revert the vandalization, and lock the Q/A from further editing. (Content dispute lock, what's it called?)
No university forbids users from asking questions online. As long as you're not letting other people do your work for you.

If you do get into trouble, in my opinion, that's your own fault.
That said, if it's SO's policy to oblige and delete the question, see question #3 (I doubt that though).

(I haven't read any of the other candidates' answers before answering myself. I believe that would have influenced how I answer these. As such, I didn't think about disassociation on this question, but that's a good option for the user. The content would still be on Stack Overflow, though.)

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

Oh boy, I get to answer my own question!

NAA is for "answers" which do not attempt to answer the question. They ask for clarification, tell us they're having the same problem, or contain something utterly unrelated to the question.

VLQ is for answer which more or less (attempt to) answer the question, but are of such abysmal quality that they should either be deleted, or completely revamped.

I'm of the opinion that both flags mean "This should probably be deleted". Since the possible resulting actions of both flags are the same, I wouldn't mind if the incorrect flag was used.

If I notice the mis-flagging becoming a pattern, I would decline one with a small explanation.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

There is no such filter, but I'd be taking care when moderating from the office. At home, I'd say: "Bring it on. I moderated a furry community, you can't shock me."

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

I'd reply to the user, voicing my appreciation of his apology. However, I would also explain that we can't make exceptions, just because someone feels sorry.

To be blunt, "being sorry" is very easy to fake online. It's a pity for those that are genuinely sorry, but we can't be lenient to some, and not to others.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This must be the most difficult question out of all of them...

I have a few answers that more or less illustrate on how I would act in certain scenario's:

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

As I'm the subject of this user's criticism, I wouldn't "handle" it myself. I would answer the meta discussions where necessary, to explain my actions and own up to my mistakes. For all I know, the user may have a point here and there. If the user keeps bringing up issues, I'd discuss the case with other (more experienced) moderators. I'd try to learn something from the criticism, but when it becomes bullying / harassment, I'd ask another moderator to step in.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

This is basically the same as question #1. I would handle it the same way.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I'd start a re-open/close/(un)delete war with said mod. It will be glorious!

Silliness aside, if I strongly disagree with the action taken on the question, I'd ask the moderator why they took that action. Never just revert it, discuss it first.

  • 13
    Note: I haven't read any of the other candidates' answers, before answering myself, as I believe that would have influenced how I answer these. As such, I didn't think about disassociation on #4, but that's a good option for the user. The content would still be on Stack Overflow, though. – Cerbrus Nov 8 '16 at 6:44
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    I like the last sentence of your answer to question 1 (The user's reputation is irrelevant, in this case.) - I think it's a very good way to see things like this. – TuringTux Nov 8 '16 at 14:43
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    I actually like that you posted a counterexample in #8, of a type of post you wouldn't write as a mod. – Ajean Nov 9 '16 at 20:37
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    You have a lot of strengths, you are intelligent and have a strong sense of justness. I believe your bluntness is in part cultural and as I've gotten to know you, I've grown more and more fond of you and to realise that you are reflective and do take counsel. You are active in moderation and I think you would make an asset as a mod on SO. – Yvette Colomb Nov 11 '16 at 13:09
  • Hi @Cerbrus, I do agree with Yvette that you have a lot of strengths, you came to help me and Shaneis for our sql room and sh**, you were not suppose to. For that, I owe you my gratitude. However, as it is an election, I have to push a bit like any candidates I support for the fairness of the election. You said you can be blunt. SO's mod job can be a tough one, from what I can see in the SO close vote room. However let's say, you are in bad mood one day. You are dealing with a user with poor programming skills and you feel that suddenly, he/she is becoming a "rash" 1/ – Andy K Nov 14 '16 at 21:48
  • How would you deal with that person? Would you resort to bluntness? Thanks for your answer and all the best for this election. 2/ – Andy K Nov 14 '16 at 21:48
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    @AndyK: Thank you for your kind words & question. If I'm in a bad mood, I'd be reluctant to moderate, in the first place. Hoever, I can under no condition let emotion dictate how I respond. If a user isn't willing to cooperate, I will remain polite, but I'll probably be less inclined to go the extra mile to help said user. – Cerbrus Nov 14 '16 at 21:53
  • 1
    While I didn't vote for you because of our mutual love of horses, the fact you mentioned it on your election profile made me go back and re-read this post, which did cause me to vote for you. Equestrians for life! – Barker Nov 19 '16 at 16:04
76

I'm ArtOfCode, and these are my answers.


  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

This is one of those particularly thorny issues. As a moderator, you need to balance the fact that this user is a valuable contributor with the fact that they're disrupting the community. If you do nothing, you'll lose users who are offended by the 10k'er and annoyed that you didn't do anything; if you take action, you'll lose that 10k user.

Ultimately, the policies are there for a reason, and if someone is generating a consistent pattern of complaints, then they need to be stopped. Even if they haven't explicitly broken any rules, there's also an unwritten rule that says "don't break the community" - and annoying everyone you come across definitely counts as breaking the community. If this user has been asked to stop before and continues their trend ignoring the warning, they need to be removed. A suspension is in order here.

Of course, there are 19 (soon to be 22) moderators here, whom you can discuss this with to come up with a proportional response.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

This is exactly what meta is for. The first thing I'd be doing is asking the group of users to post about their concerns on meta. While they're doing that, I can be discussing my own actions with the other mods to gauge if I really did do the wrong thing or not. I can use that discussion to post my answer to the meta question, explaining why I did what I did, and why I stand by it (or why I understand that it was the wrong decision and I have reversed it).

This doesn't change in chat - it's a bit more real-time and more prone to heightened tempers, but I can always draft in another moderator to calm chat down while meta does its thing.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

Definitely. I can refer directly to experience here - on Hardware Recommendations, we have a rather limited and convoluted scope. I don't like it, but the community either does, or just doesn't want to go through changing it, so that's what we have. I'm still perfectly capable of enforcing that scope, whether or not I agree with it.

If there's a policy that both I and a majority of the community disagree with, why is it still there? Unless it's one of the SE-dictated policies (which I generally find to be sensible), that policy needs to be changed yesterday. TO META!

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question:

    Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university
    honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out
    

    The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

Unfortunately for this user, they should have thought of that before they posted on Stack Overflow. I temporarily lock the post (the mod tools allow locks that automatically get released after 24 hours, which is what I'd be using), decline the flags, and add a comment advising the author that self-vandalism is frowned upon, but if they want to dissociate the question from their account, they can do that by contacting the SE team. From there, it's up to them what they want to do.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

There is some overlap between the two. However, NAA flags are generally for things that have nothing to do with the question, such as comments-as-answers or completely new questions. VLQ is more about posts that do address the question, but are unhelpful or uninformative - Andy's example of "Look at fancyMethod" is a good one.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

I'm fine with that. I already moderate spam, so I see a lot of advertising for certain, ahem, supplements. If university IT have noticed, they're certainly going to be giving me strange looks, but nobody's said anything about it. Much of my moderation is done from home, anyway, where there are no filters and I'm the net admin.

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

No, the ban doesn't get lifted. If I go and murder someone, and get 23 years in jail, but tell the prison officers that I understand it was wrong and won't do it again, I'm still not getting let out until that 23 year sentence is up.

Moderators apply the same principle - you have to serve out your punishment.

If this is a second offence for the same thing, you clearly haven't learned your lesson, so the suspension is definitely not getting lifted.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

My answer to "Moderator attention needed" on HR meta was a good one. (TL;DR: someone complained about my closures of their questions discouraging their participation, my answer explained the situation without turning it into a confrontation.) There are a number of posts in that spirit on HR meta.

Since Andy mentioned his post on Open Source meta, I may as well mention my answer, which is a good example of my ability to own up to my mistakes and do something about them. That was early on in my moderating career, and I think I've only got better since then.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This actually happened to me fairly recently - for the protection and anonymisation of those involved, I'm not going to say where, when, or who - but the important thing here was communication. There were a couple of comments between him and me, addressing the issue, and there was a brief chat about it - "here's what it seems like to me" -- "here's what I'm trying to do". I also talked to my fellow moderators about it, and they helped out by responding to meta posts and eventually we encouraged him to make his meta posts more about actions than people. That was enough for me, and it still worked for him.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Ah, the standard question. Shouldn't we change these now that everyone knows what to say?

This is sort of the same question as number 1 - users like these, while valuable, are not worth the effort they require in placating users and responding to incidents. They need to be warned about their behaviour, and if they can't shape up they may need to take a holiday.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Communication. Surprisingly enough, it's the answer to almost every moderation problem. I'd go talk to the moderator in question in the moderators' private room to find out their reasons. If we can't agree, either one of us needs to let it go, or create a meta post to debate the issue with the community.

  • 3
    About no 7, you said you wont lift the ban but what if you post 1 month of ban on user and user asked to remove with genuine reason then? you mentioned that 23 year of jail becaues of murder but keep in mind, some time due to good behaviour they are getting free in half amount of year too so why not here? it might happen that user did not too that point intensely, then? Don't you even think twice? – Leo the lion Nov 8 '16 at 9:30
  • You shouldn't be so punishment-oriented. Anyway, I will vote for you. – user6820627 Nov 8 '16 at 13:52
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    @Leothelion If there's a genuine reason to remove the suspension, sure, it can be done. Just being remorseful isn't a valid reason to get out of jail free, so to speak. – ArtOfCode Nov 8 '16 at 14:04
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    @LearnHowToBeTransparent I don't think I am overly punishment-oriented. They have their place, and are an inescapable part of moderation, but I'm not one to over use them. – ArtOfCode Nov 8 '16 at 14:04
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    I like your point of view concerning the second part of question 3 (If there's a policy that both I and a majority of the community disagree with, why is it still there?). To me, this seems like a good way to handle such policies. – TuringTux Nov 8 '16 at 14:37
  • @ArtOfCode happy with your thought..good luck..will be happy to see you in mod list :) – Leo the lion Nov 8 '16 at 18:10
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    WRT #5: So would you decline a NAA flag that, in your opinion, should have been a VLQ flag? To use an example, let's say you see a NAA flag on a post that is "check this [link]", where the link is to some helpful blogpost and isn't spam. Do you decline the flag? – Nic Hartley Nov 14 '16 at 20:29
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    @QPaysTaxes No. This is controversial - many awesome moderators would decline that kind of flag; many others wouldn't. My personal take is that if a flag leads to me taking action, then it helped me do my job and should be marked helpful. – ArtOfCode Nov 14 '16 at 20:51
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    @ArtOfCode You should edit your answer to say that, then, because as it is it's unclear. – Nic Hartley Nov 14 '16 at 20:53
  • @ArtOfCode I sympathize with your personal take. In the absence of a specific policy to the contrary, I would do what you do. But there does seem to be a specific policy to the contrary. Here are the reasons why we have been told to take a strict approach to evaluating flags: Why are the moderators being so strict with quality related flags recently? Let me know what you think. – MetaEd Nov 15 '16 at 16:19
  • @MetaEd On the contrary. I do what I do because that's what the moderator documentation tells us to do. "unless the flag was entirely against the spirit of the site or shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the network and the purpose of flagging, you should mark any flag as Helpful if it leads to you taking any sort of action" - see /help/mod-flags on your site, specifically the last section. – ArtOfCode Nov 15 '16 at 17:46
  • As I interacted with this candidate as a moderator... well, he's following the rules as he understood them and doesn't consider any arguments even most clear, politely. This isn't well when it's going about the vague rules as about a convoluted scope or is it opinion asking or not. Won't vote, this is what I don't want at SO. – Les Nov 18 '16 at 10:44
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    @Les I don't understand what you're saying. Perhaps you could clarify? – ArtOfCode Nov 18 '16 at 10:47
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    @smci I'm not trying to be evasive, I'm deliberately trying to make a statement about how policy should be treated in general, without a focus on any particular policies. Having general ways of doing things is important. But, since you ask, yes, there are plenty of policies that are poorly-defined or subjective. I'm not so sure about arbitrary, though - they all have their reasons, whether they're good reasons or not. – ArtOfCode Nov 22 '16 at 12:42
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    @smci as a remark, this isn't an issue for this candidate, but, for, example, vagueness of the "opinion based" policies are irritating as well. It leads to a bot-style unarguable judgements, the same question could be closed or not with a little change in the last string. – Les Nov 22 '16 at 15:34
73

I'm Aaron Hall, here's my nomination.

These are my answers to the questions. Note that they represent my instincts based on my knowledge of how the site works. If we have a policy that requires immediate actions on my part, I will take the required action with all deliberate speed.

Also, I expect to create and follow a process that covers every situation, to try to ensure optimal outcomes for everyone.

  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

Here's the steps I would take in this situation:

  1. I review the content that led to the flags. Sometimes people leave constructive comments that just come across harshly. If you leave lots of constructive comments, not all of them will be well received, so it may be that at least some of the flags are completely unjustified.

  2. If possible, I try to identify the aspect or aspects of the communication that leads to the negative perception. Perhaps they can cut back on redundant commentary. Perhaps they're adding unnecessary emphasis. Perhaps they're just being combative and over-the-top. Perhaps they're dripping with snark and sarcasm. There's no need for that kind of communication.

  3. I let them know about the flags. I explain that the flags are not something they want to be getting. I give them suggestions based on my analysis and ask them try to eliminate the behavior that is causing the flags.

I believe that the goal for moderation is compliance and cooperation with the community, not punishment.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

My decisions must stand to scrutiny. Perhaps I am wrong. No moderator on this site is infallible. They are welcome to bring it to meta and have me explain my decisions.

If the ruling was in a chatroom, there is very little difference. Chat is still moderated first by the community. If a chatroom gets outside of community standards, they are liable to having a moderator get involved.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

Yes. I do not usually disagree with Stack Overflow, its employees, or the community. However, I will enforce their decisions, in that order of priority.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

They can request to have their account be disassociated from the question, but the content is licensed to Stack Overflow by virtue of the terms of service (CC-BY-SA), and the site is entitled to have the question. If they still objected, I would likely escalate it to a Stack Overflow employee.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

Not An Answer (NAA) means that the "answer" does not answer the question, and is not actually an answer.

Very Low Quality (VLQ) means that the answer attempts to answer the question, but it is so deficient as to make its value to the site negative, and worthy of deletion.

Depending on the severity, I might delete them in either case.

If it was a Very Low Quality answer, I would see if they had been told to improve the answer, if they had, and been given sufficient time (a week?) but had not, I would delete it.

A Not An Answer would get deleted altogether.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

Yes. This should not be a problem.

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offense for the same behavior, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

That's great that they won't do it again. They still need to wait out the period. If they don't wait out the suspension period, we will teach them that there may be no consequences in the future if they do the same thing. That could actually encourage the risky/poor behavior to happen again.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This question demonstrates my organic moderation style up to this point. This question illustrates my interest in preserving and creating great content.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Maybe I'm making a mistake, and no one but this user is willing to tell me.

Maybe the user is offended by an action of mine, and is engaging in flagrant recrimination.

Maybe it's a little of both.

I'll discuss with other moderators, perhaps offline, and determine what I should do about it.

Perhaps I need to adjust or change my style.

Perhaps this person needs to drop the vendetta.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

See my response to question 1, assuming that their comments are not over the line. To expand without the details from question 1, I'll assume that at least some of these comments are now definitively over the line.

I would then tell them that while their answers are quite valuable, their comments are unacceptable - and I would quote them so that they can see exactly what I'm talking about.

I would tell them that sometimes it's just best not to engage in the comments - and that goes doubly so for them. If I can persuade them to cooperate with the site and stop the flaw-worthy comments, then we can move forward. If they don't cooperate, I will have to invoke whatever options the system makes available to me - up to and including suspensions.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would probably ask them about it, since I'm not shy. I certainly don't have time to give second guessing a priority.

Nevertheless, I will investigate things that do not pass smell tests, look at the evidence, and escalate to other moderators and the community as necessary. If groups of users have a problem with a moderator's decision, that's certainly worth investigating.

Moderators have to make decisions. Those decisions aren't always clear-cut and easy, but they must be made. Once they're made, it's unlikely to unmake them. I suppose it has happened, but not very often.


If you find any aspects of my answer you wish me to expand upon, please leave a comment!

  • 22
    "... I certainly don't have time to give it the same amount of scrutiny that he or she should have given it" If you don't have time to give questions the scrutiny that a moderator should, can you explain why you feel you'd be an effective moderator? – anaximander Nov 8 '16 at 9:43
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    @anaximander That's going to be my time to scrutinize decisions made by other mods. I'm saying that I'm not going to prioritize second guessing. – Aaron Hall Nov 8 '16 at 11:29
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    I may not have communicated my position here very well. I have updated my answer on this matter: "I would probably ask them about it, since I'm not shy. I certainly don't have time to give second guessing a priority. Nevertheless, I will investigate things that do not pass smell tests, look at the evidence, and escalate to other moderators and the community as necessary. If groups of users have a problem with a moderator's decision, that's certainly worth investigating." – Aaron Hall Nov 10 '16 at 15:31
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    Talking about bullying on Stackoverflow. Sometimes you can observe instances where a person and his friends vote to close the questions from a particular poster for no specific reason. What would your decision in that case? – Simple Fellow Nov 15 '16 at 10:41
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    I know more action (like election) got a non-democratic results. Teaching is learning so also Learning is teaching to. I'am only hope a "High level humanity" from a moderator. A lot user, a lot things and a lot characer but point is what is big learning ?. Good luck on mod-election. I hope you selected. – dsgdfg Nov 15 '16 at 11:17
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    I voted only for you because you are the only one who promised to be fair. – Billal BEGUERADJ Nov 15 '16 at 14:28
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    Just a comment for giving support to your nomination. I have just started to participate in SE and since then I have read a lot and I have read many of your answers. I think you are the kind of people who likes (and love) our profession. If to be moderator is what you want I hope you achive it. Anyways at the moment of this comment you have +10K votes :-). Good luck! – Laiv Nov 15 '16 at 18:07
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    You got my vote, @AaronHall. – Thank you Nov 18 '16 at 20:40
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    "I believe that the goal for moderation is compliance and cooperation with the community, not punishment." - Do you believe that suspension is just a punishment instead of a way to keep the discussions in the community civil and constructive by suspending the user who is constantly causing them to be otherwise? – Anuswadh Nov 19 '16 at 4:36
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  • I like almost all of what you write, however I think your view of users is sometimes way too charitable. "4. ... I would likely escalate it to SO employee" strikes me like total abjuration. Some users are trying to game SO, for a multitude of reasons. Why would you not immediately lock the post, tell them how to apply for dissociation, tell them the copyright policy, and if they're seriously unreasonable or do this habitually, suspend them? – smci Nov 22 '16 at 11:24
  • We're a gamified site, so being gamed is something we should expect. Also, most sites allow you to control what content you put out, but if I have to tell them the copyright policy, they apparently haven't read all of our rules, and will feel like we're bait-and-switching them. A second instance would be another matter, but before suspending them, I would ensure that they were communicated the gravity of their actions on the previous occasion in a very explicit way "This is serious - next time you will be suspended. The system remembers, even if you forget." – Aaron Hall Nov 22 '16 at 12:06
52

I'm Magisch, this is my nomination and these are my answers to your questions.

1 - A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

Being a 10k user obviously doesn't absolve them from having to follow the "be nice" principle. If they can't do that, I have to temporarily suspend them. There has been plenty of precedent for this. If someone absolutely cannot abide by the basic rules our site is governed by, and if they fail to change when being alerted about it (for someone with no prior record of this, that is usually the first step), that is where a suspension has to come in. Starting short at first, then increasing in length if they fail to change their ways.

Ultimately the users need to be protected from continued rude language and a hostile atmosphere, regardless of whom it comes from.

2 - How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chat room?

First of all, verify with other fellow moderators in the appropriate chat room for this. I'm not perfect, and I can overlook things, so I'll always entertain the idea that I may be wrong and double check my own decisions when prompted.

If it indeed turns out that these people are disagreeing with long standing policy and are harming the site because of it, then I will take the necessary action to abate that behavior, whether they agree with it or not.

Ultimately, if they have a substantial disagreement with site policy, the proper way to redress these grievances is to raise the issue on meta, not to discuss with a moderator in chat about it.

3 - Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

Absolutely. I have disagreed plenty of times with standing policy, and raised these disagreements on meta. Ultimately, now or as a moderator though, I'm absolutely not making policy of my own. As a moderator, my primary task will be to enforce current policy. If I want to change policy due to disagreement, I'll have to address that in the same way that other members of the community do.

4 - A user vandalizes their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

If the answers are decent, the question stays. The user does not have the right to just unilaterally remove their question from the site once it's been answered.

That said, there are ways to help such users. I would lock the question (Content dispute) and send the user a moderator message outlining what they can do to resolve their situation (contact the team for disassociation, anonymizing details carefully without invalidating answers, etc.). Usually this will succeed in resolving issues they may have. Ultimately, though, it is the user's responsibility that the measures they take to anonymize the post do not invalidate good answers.

If they absolutely cannot be reasoned with, a short suspension is in order.

5 - Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

NAA is fairly straightforward. It's a flag that indicates that an answer is not even close to an actual answer. It's not even an attempt at an actual answer. These are fairly easy to identify (what with all the excellent guides on this topic floating around on meta.)

VLQ means "Very Low Quality" and indicates just that. A post may be an attempt at an answer but completely unsalvageable due to quality issues. It may be a question that is completely unsalvageable due to quality issues. That means the quality of the post is so bad that no amount of editing can reasonably make it stand as a non-garbage post.

Ultimately, when I come across a question or answer that necessitates mod removal to keep the site clean, I'll do that. As for the flag, usually I'd just dismiss it as helpful. For lots of people, the line can be blurry between NAA and VLQ, and if the purpose is served of alerting me to a post that requires my attention, that is good enough for me.

If a user had a pattern of completely wrong flagging answers (lots of them), I would decline one with an explanatory text.

6 - Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

Yes, and yes. Images are another issue, but I can handle those separately. All in all, that will pose no issue for me at all. I'm already subject to some of the most vile stuff on the site due to my involvement in the Smoke Detector project (a chat bot that detects spam), and this isn't my first time moderating things. There is relatively little the internet could throw at me that would pose an issue.

7 - You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behavior, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

In almost all situations, I will not lift the ban. Users have to discharge responsibility for their actions, and the ban is temporary. I imposed it in good faith and according to guidelines, and the user knows what they did is wrong, and why. It's a low duration temporary ban, and part of the learning opportunity would be lost if I just rescinded it on request.

I would however reply and explain this to them.

8 - Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

There would be this one, which exemplifies (in my opinion) one of the main purposes of meta. The user came here after feeling wronged by a site moderation decision, and meta can help with that by providing clear and extensive reasoning. I like helping people understand and appreciate why we do things. It breeds less resentment and generates more cooperation from users, and makes for an overall better user experience.

9 - A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

A user generally has a right to question me on meta. As long as the posts are constructive, I shall address any concerns raised in them to the very best of my ability. Certainly I won't take adverse moderation action against someone just because they question my decisions a lot.

It's me who is serving the community, and I will always strive to be fully accountable for my actions. It is paramount for the users to retain trust in our community moderation system, and transparency in these decisions is one of the site's primary strengths and vital in maintaining that trust.

10 - How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Most smart people can be reasoned with. Most users can be educated about bad behavior. That's always the first choice when dealing with problematic users.

However, if the user cannot stop to adversely affect the site in negative ways, then even a stream of valuable answers does not grant them immunity from a timeout.

For very high profile users, I'd definitely double-check my decisions with a second moderator first, and maybe a community manager, as I know has been done before.

11 - How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would address it with them first. Unless it's completely and blatantly wrong, I assume good faith on the part of my fellow moderators. Even then, I'd probably take it to the moderator himself first. Maybe they had information or reasons to do this that I'm not privy to at the moment.

  • 4
    Hi Magisch, I have found you to be an enthusiastic participant on SO, and SE, assisting in moderation activities. My only concern is you are a bit new to the site and perhaps you might not be quite ready for a mod position, but may be down the track. How do you feel about my take on this? – Yvette Colomb Nov 11 '16 at 13:18
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    @YvetteColomb You raise a legitimate concern that I respect. I think I can do it regardless. If not this time, maybe the next time. I decided that I want to do this, so I'm giving it my best shot now, though. – mag Nov 11 '16 at 14:22
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    Good luck, from what I have seen, you are maybe new around here but you seem to be competent enough to do the job. – Her Majesty Queen of ARC Nov 12 '16 at 10:28
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    Hi @Magisch, thanks for your nomination. I'd be honest, you are one of the people I support, most likely because you are famous in the SO vote close room. However, one thing bug me a bit about your nomination is the feeling (and it it is a personal one) that you are a bit going straight to the business, without understanding the context. Mods from what I'm understanding needs to have a mixture between knowing the technical and having enough empathy to deal with any users , regardless of their questions , their tones etc ... What would you prove that you have that spark, 1/ – Andy K Nov 14 '16 at 21:39
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    that would prove that you can handle any "poor" users who are asking poorly formulated questions? All the best for this election. 2/ – Andy K Nov 14 '16 at 21:40
40

I'm Samuel Liew, and these are my answers to your questions:

  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

I would err on the side of caution here, and not simply apply suspensions for having multiple flags. I would take a closer look at the comments, try to understand both sides of the conversation, while attempting to continue handling the comment flags individually depending on it’s own severity - leaving a gentle reminder for all users to remain objective, deleting the non-constructive ones, and declining flags for those that do actually help to clarify or improve the question. If the comments are hostile and offensive, then they may warrant a short suspension with a warning. Suspensions should be used sparingly, especially if it’s not a rule violation.

This explanation by Brad Larson regarding a light touch on suspensions resonates well with me, as our objective is to serve the community by keeping Stack Overflow orderly and not to turn people away.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

This depends on context of the situation. I would bring up proof of the policy, and will also consult other moderators on whether I applied the policy correctly. If said policy is unclear or could be interpreted multiple ways, I will raise a post on meta to further discuss the issue with the community. If I realize I made a mistake, I will revert my actions and apologize sincerely.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

Yes, the existing policies are there for a reason, and most of them have extensive meta discussions around them. If anyone has a disagreement with an existing policy, they are free to take it up on meta for further discussion.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMOVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

I will lock the question, decline the flags and post a comment explaining that we do not tolerate vandalism, as content submitted by users are licensed to Stack Overflow. Also, that if the user has an issue, to contact support for their case to be reviewed.

I believe there are certain actions mods can take from here, like disassociating posts and editing post history, which will be used appropriately based on the sensitivity of the copyrighted information. The reason we avoid nuking the question outright is to protect useful answers and the time spent writing them.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

NAA: When a user posts on update or comment as an answer, and it should be edited into the question or converted to a comment.

VLQ: A user attempts to answer the question, however the explanation is lost due to poor content/formatting and cannot be salvaged/made useful by editing. VLQ is basically a “remove this content” flag where the reporter believes no other alternative action could be taken to improve the answer.

If a post is wrongly flagged but upon investigation that it was a post that required moderator intervention, I would still accept the flag as “helpful”, and take appropriate action. However, if the content of the post doesn’t warrant an instant delete and could be handled by downvotes/close votes, I would decline the flag and let the community decide.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

I will be able to handle flags in the privacy of my home most of the time outside of office hours. While at work, I will be able to handle flags on my personal devices, and will have the privacy to do so. Throughout the day, I will not just be focusing purely on flags, but cleanup and meta participation as well, which is allowed (from the IT security and usage policy).

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

I would unlikely suspend the ban and advise the user take the week to cool off and reflect on their actions and how they can improve their behaviour after the suspension. I do not see any benefit of lifting bans early, unless it involves a policy that is not black/white (one which can be further discussed on meta). Furthermore, I would be already holding back on suspensions (refer to first question) unless the user is very disruptive or has a malicious intent.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I do not have any to single out in particular now. I will be more active on meta to engage the community as part of the responsibilities of a moderator. If you are wondering why I have few SO meta posts, that is due to the migration to Meta.SE.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I will assume good faith and treat the user with respect, as well as reflect on the user’s comments. I do not see any issues with constructive and logically sound advice. As for other rants about a specific action, I would advise the user to bring it up on meta or chat for further discussion with the community and other moderators.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Similar to the first question, I would treat each flag individually. No user should be granted immunity or special treatment based on their reputation, as it will divide the community. Appropriate action will be taken based on the severity of the situation, including warnings and leading up to a suspension.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I will discuss it separately with the moderator to ascertain the logic behind the action, and if necessary, I will let the moderator take the remedial action on the same post. Displaying conflicting moderation styles/actions does not portray professionalism.

  • 14
    If you have reached here, thank you for taking the time to read the answers. Feel free to ask me any questions or clarify your doubts. – Samuel Liew Nov 13 '16 at 5:35
  • "However, if the content of the post doesn’t warrant an instant delete and could be handled by downvotes/close votes, I would decline the flag and let the community decide." That's not how flags or moderating is supposed to work. This could easily result in a declined flag on a post that later gets deleted, leaving the flagger in a state of confusion, and which I feel is an unfair decline. I think VLQ flags are also not necessarily a "delete this" flag; it can also be seen as a request for an edit so the content is no longer VLQ (e.g. link-only answers). – Keith M Nov 14 '16 at 22:33
  • I'm confused by your response. Why are you talking about custom flags? The question was about VLQ and NAA flags, which a moderator CAN handle, but do not exclusively handle. And you say "certain flags"... You are applying to be a moderator, but you don't even know which flags non-moderators can handle? What do you mean by that? – Keith M Nov 14 '16 at 22:53
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    @KeithM apologies, I misunderstood your question and wrote a terrible response. I agree that VLQ declined flags that later gets deleted by others, will cause confusion for users who are not familiar with the system. In fact, a couple of my VLQ flags previously has this outcome. A moderator could skip that flag or accept as helpful, but let 20k users vote to delete instead. This answer explains the policy in more detail meta.stackoverflow.com/a/305798/584192 – Samuel Liew Nov 14 '16 at 23:00
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    Really good to see your late nomination. A worthy candidate. – Yvette Colomb Nov 15 '16 at 4:52
  • 2
    @YvetteColomb Thank you for your kind word of encouragement and support. – Samuel Liew Nov 15 '16 at 4:55
  • On «licensed it to Stack Exchange under the CC-SA»: ok, I get your point; but the CC-BY-SA is a license to everyone, not just Stack Exchange. That's the point of a public license. – Nemo Nov 15 '16 at 22:42
  • Hi @Nemo, thanks for pointing that out. Yes, I should have made that clearer. I meant Stack Overflow as a site which also includes the users (including public guests), and did not mention Stack Exchange (company). – Samuel Liew Nov 15 '16 at 22:48
29

I am vaultah. Here's my nomination.


  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

No one is exempt from the Be nice policy. Additionally, comments should be used for requesting clarification and constructive criticism. Incoming flags are a clear indication that the user uses them wrong.

Obviously, the high reputation and valuable contributions of the user will increase the number of messages I'll send to them before taking any actions, and any serious action will require an agreement of other moderators.

As they have already been warned, I would start with a week-long suspension and a message reminding them about the previous warnings. Subsequent suspensions may or may not be longer.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

First of all, I'll inform them about the rules I followed when making that decision. Since the conversation in chat is very dynamic, I may impose a short timeout (60 seconds?) to do that without any interruptions.

If the explanation doesn't satisfy them, I'll advise that they raise this issue on Meta, which is the right place for extended discussions. It will let community members and other moderators weigh in with full-fledged answers, and will increase the possibility of positive outcome.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

In my opinion, moderators are here to ensure the site grows the way it was intended by the company behind it. As a community moderator I'll have to put community interests before my own, and I'm fine with it.

If I ever have to enforce too many Stack Overflow policies that the community and I disagree with, I will likely step down.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

All content users post on Stack Overflow is "perpetually and irrevocably licensed to Stack Exchange under the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike license" (source). This gives Stack Exchange the right to use it in practically any way they see fit, and the policy is to avoid deleting useful content, in this case answers.

I may delete the question, but the OP's request won't play a major role in making this decision. It will come down to the quality of the question and answers.

If I see anything worth saving, I'll send (or tell the OP to send) a dissociation request to the CM team (see this for more info). In the meantime, I'll restore the post to the last "normal" revision and lock it. Disassociation isn't meant to be used often, though, so I'll see if I can remove identifying content first.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

NAAs are posts that are completely unrelated to the question OR do not contain even a slight (but perceptible) attempt at solving the question. This category includes

  • follow-up questions
  • questions about the question
  • "Thanks!"
  • "bump", "I have the same problem"
  • answers written in languages other than English

VLQ answers do attempt to answer the question, but are just very bad at it. This includes answers that are very hard to understand because of poster's poor English or formatting skills.

All NAAs and the majority of VLQs should be deleted, and since in some cases the line between NAA and VLQ is blurred, I'll mark the flag as helpful and perform the necessary action regardless of type of flag used. But I'll find a way to explain the difference to those who frequently use the wrong flag.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

I will be moderating from home, which is also my workplace, so there shouldn't be any problems.

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offence for the same behaviour, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

Honestly, I can't give a definite answer. I would judge each case individually based on the answers to the following questions:

  • How long has the user been on Stack Overflow?
  • What offence did the user commit?
  • Does the user have a history of bad behaviour?

In principle, I have no objections to lifting the first ban if the offence was minor. But then, 1 week isn't that long.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Frankly, I rarely post answers, but I like asking well-thought-out questions. Some of them become moderately popular. For example, this one may show my familiarity with site rules regarding comments.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I'm totally fine with constructive criticism, even if all of their posts are directed at me.

On the other hand, rants may be an indication of personal dislike, caused by misunderstanding of my words or actions. In that case, I'd ask another moderator to handle the problem to avoid aggravating it further. In the meantime, I'd reach out to the user and try to settle the issue privately.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Same as 1.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

It's best to ask a third moderator for their opinion.

I definitely won't confront them openly -- the team of moderators is supposed to behave as a whole, with no apparent contradictions. Instead, I'll discuss my concern privately with them and other moderators as soon as possible and try to understand their reasoning. However, if it's decided that the action was inappropriate and the moderator has a long history of improper actions, I'll pass it on to the CM team.

  • 1
    Non-English answers and link-only answers should be flagged as NAA, not VLQ. See How do I deal with non-English content? and Your answer is in another castle: when is an answer not an answer? – Michał Perłakowski Nov 11 '16 at 14:19
  • @Gothdo: I stand corrected. Thanks! – vaultah Nov 11 '16 at 15:32
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    "I'll contact them via an off-site method of communication..." (Q9) - this is not something a moderator should do. Moderator messages or private chats are your options for private communication with users; using off-site methods opens you and your moderator team up to allegations of abuse which SO can't investigate. – ArtOfCode Nov 11 '16 at 17:45
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    @Gothdo except see this too: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/183603/… – Keith M Nov 11 '16 at 20:10
  • @ArtOfCode I see your point, thanks. I edited my answers a bit. – vaultah Nov 12 '16 at 11:43
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    Hi @vaultah, thanks for your nomination. You know what they said, the help matters as much as the personae of the helpers. I'll be honest, you are not invisible but your interaction with other participants are not really visible, you helped a lot but like any political event, we need to see you. In such visible role as the SO mod, you need to be able not only to form good judgement but also to be able to stand up, regardless of doing something or nothing. The community needs someone who will not shy away, retreat behind their screen. How can we know, you will do that e.g 1/ – Andy K Nov 14 '16 at 21:34
  • meddle and also take decisions instead of "shying" away? Thanks for your answer and all the best for this election – Andy K Nov 14 '16 at 21:35
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    "I flag, close vote, delete vote, downvote and upvote generously, and use my python duplicate hammer (among the top 100 hammer users)." - Interesting that query also shows @vaultah as having the 3rd highest error rate among those 100 — 20%(!) error – sehe Nov 15 '16 at 8:17
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    @sehe: yes, indeed. My error rate would not have been so high, if I hadn't bothered to admit and fix my own mistakes. – vaultah Nov 15 '16 at 8:47
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    @vaultah That's nice. I do that too, although I very much doubt that changes the picture much. Patience is a very important virtue. – sehe Nov 15 '16 at 9:13
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    @sehe: I somewhat agree. Sometimes I guess the error in questions without proper MCVE or the problem in unclear questions -- this prevents users from posting their guesses as answers. I usually favorite questions I closed to receive updates and reopen them as soon as people clarify things. Sometimes I pick dupe targets in rush and then find better dupe targets 1 minute later. In such cases I reopen them and ask my friends to rehammer them with better target. I don't really consider such cases as errors, however I admit that they don't make up 100 percent of my errors. – vaultah Nov 15 '16 at 10:18
  • @vaultah I'm surprised you think answering based on a guess is premature, but dupe-hammering is not. I say, put it on hold. I know about speed mis-hammering :) I'm rarely in a hurry though. – sehe Nov 15 '16 at 11:13
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    @AndyK: I understand the concern, and I can assure you -- I'm not afraid to intervene when the situation calls for it, and I aim to collaborate with the community closely in chat, Meta, and on the main site (consider this a promise!). Yet, I believe that sometimes it is apt to draw back, especially if you suspect that your actions may do more harm than good. I apologise for the delay and hope this answers your question. – vaultah Nov 15 '16 at 17:22
  • It does @vaultah. Thanks. – Andy K Nov 15 '16 at 17:35
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    @Nemo: poor wording on my part. Thanks, I fixed it. – vaultah Nov 18 '16 at 18:14
-3

I am Neal aka Naftali and here are my answers to your questions:

  1. A 10k+ user regularly has their comments flagged as "rude or offensive" or "not constructive", to the tune of 4-5 flags a day. No comment by itself is particularly offensive, but their general tone causes them to be flagged by multiple users. You've contacted them privately about this, but they believe that they aren't doing anything wrong and that people are being too sensitive. The flags keep coming in on their comments. What, if anything, do you do next?

This is a "sticky" situation as it is a "high reputation" user. But I can say from experience that high rep does not mean much as I have just gained so much from old questions and answers that have become canonical over the years.

Reputation should not stop a moderator for putting some sort of "ban" or stoppage of a user from posting comments for a little bit of time as long as it is in agreement with one or two other moderators.

  1. How would you, as a moderator, deal with a situation where a group of users unanimously disagree with your ruling while you're 100% sure you based your decision on the standing policy? What if your ruling was in a chatroom?

Nothing I say can always be the one "truth" I have to adhere to the restrictions of the community.

If they agree (and other moderators also agree) that I may have been in err, I will try to show my point of view and accept the other view also and try to come to a mediation.

  1. Not everyone agrees with every Stack Exchange policy, guideline, section of scope, etc. As a moderator, do you think you'll be able to effectively moderate and enforce Stack Overflow policies you may personally disagree with, but which the community strongly supports - or, as Aaroninus suggested, perhaps which you and the community disagree with?

I will try to to the best of my ability.

As with any job there comes parts that you really do not want to do, but if that is your job you do it. And I think the same applies to moderation.

  1. A user vandalises their post and enters a "rollback war", trying to change it to simply read "QUESTION REMUVED FOR PRIVACY". They had also submitted (rejected) suggested edits to do likewise to the answers. By the time you see it they've also flagged or commented on the question: Please delete this ASAP, it's super urgent that I remove this because my university honor code demands that I do and I'm going to get kicked out The question was pretty poor to begin with, but received 3 decent answers and had been edited a little before the vandalism started. What do you do?

I would try to have some sort of private messaging with the user, if that goes unresolved and it seems like the question is salvageable I will try to work with them in removing the sections that may be dicey.

If either of those don't work I would try to work with other moderators to come up with a solution -- whether it be disassociating the original author from the question or deleting it outright if need be.

  1. Please explain, in your words, the difference between these flags: NAA and VLQ. How would you act on a "NAA" answer which is flagged as VLQ, or vice versa?

NAA -- It mean that the answer is not an answer -- not that it does not answer the question correctly or that the answer is just not right, it means that most probably the user did not use the site correctly and is posting a comment rather than an answer - or may be spam.

VLQ -- The answer could be answering the question, and it could be a very good answer, but maybe it is a link only answer or it was written with terrible grammar and is very misunderstood. In the grammar case the flag should probably be declined and the answer edited to make a little more sense.

  1. Moderation sometimes entails seeing some questionable content. Are you willing to take that risk? If you'll be moderating at your workplace, do you have a corporate filter that will take issue with this?

We do not have a filter where I am, but I would be careful and light on my feet when I moderate during working hours.

  1. You impose a temporary ban (say 1 week) on a user for what you judged as reasonable and valid reasons (the user gets notified by email of your action and the reason). The user replies to your email acknowledging the transgression, says they won't do it again and asks for the ban to be lifted. The user sounds genuine. Do you remove the ban? Do you even reply at all? Explain your reasoning. The context of this question applies to longer bans too. If it helps get the juices flowing, consider the situation of a second offense for the same behavior, which has a default ban period of 1 month.

As someone who has been in this situation quite a few years ago and learned from it, I would ask for them to wait the week of their ban. It will give them time to think and maybe even an opportunity to come back smiling.

When it happened to me 4-5 years ago it did help me reflect on things and come back with a newer sense of how the site worked.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

One of the meta posts I am most proud of is this one as it gave me the experience of being a new user and how people react and try to help new users. I really hope I can do experiments like that again in the future.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Probably in the same vein as I would handle it in question #2.

Although it is possible that the user has some other issues -- I would ask if another moderator can act as an intermediary to work out the issue so that it would not just be a one-on-one and seem like an altercation.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Some people (like myself) sometimes do not realize that when they make a comment it can be perceived as hurtful or mean as they are not aware of how others can read those comments. Recently I have had the same issue and someone pointed out a better way that I can word my comments so that they are not taken in the wrong light.

I would try to work with those particular users in that fashion, and if that does not work I would try to work with other moderators in coming up with a solution, whether it be a temp ban or something less severe.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would talk it over with them -- I would NOT post and rant about it on meta as they may lead to more unrest.

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    Spam should be flagged as spam, not as NAA. Also, a link only answer should be flagged as NAA, not as VLQ. – Michał Perłakowski Nov 10 '16 at 5:48
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    @Gothdo I am not saying that span should not be marked as spam, I am just answering the question as to what it could mean when someone marks an answer as NAA – Neal Nov 10 '16 at 15:14

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