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The answer provided and accepted, was clearly wrong due to being out of date.

However, there was another answer, with equal up-votes that answered it correctly based on up to date information.

Is it right still (for someone else) to change the accepted answer to be a duplicate of the other answer?

See example here: Email verification using Firebase 3.0 on Android

Previous to edit 10 mins ago, it said it was not available, and now changed to say it is. With a link to the exact same source.

Would it not be better to:

  • have the accepted answer flag changed to the other answer.

  • Or leave the answer as it was.

  • Or even delete the accepted answer.

  • Reference the other answer as having an updated info on the matter

Rather than create a duplicate, without reference to the other answer. e.g.( Update: See below for avaliablity since v9.6)

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    I guess it's a huge edit to the answer, it changes it all I think it will be nicer to edit the accepted answer with a note ... to review the other one. – DaniP Nov 3 '16 at 15:30
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    @DaniP Yes. I think that is probably ideal. Possibly in the form of a comment, and having left the answer as was, since it was not his answer. Just wonder what the "offcial" way is. – IAmGroot Nov 3 '16 at 15:36
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    I don't know about what you're asking about, but changing the answer to have a huge Update heading on it just looks hideous. – Heretic Monkey Nov 3 '16 at 15:36
  • I work on the same team as Kato, we regularly edit each other's answers when it is more efficient than asking each other to make the edit. In this case my edit was triggered by the fact that another question referred to Kato's outdated answer as authoritative. I initially added my change as an Update block, but felt it looked horrible and the original answer was useless (not just slightly outdated). I now added said block back with the same original goal: ensuring an up to date answer from an authoritative source. – Frank van Puffelen Nov 3 '16 at 16:03
  • @FrankvanPuffelen In that case, it makes sense what you did. It was just not clear to me that the above was the situation. Apologies for any disruption. :) I was just curious on what the recommendations to such edits was. And the scope above I had not even considered. – IAmGroot Nov 3 '16 at 17:02
  • No problem. I made the edit in a rush, so appreciate the extra eyes – Frank van Puffelen Nov 3 '16 at 17:06
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Let's get some things out of the way.

  • The edit was not made by the original answerer, but by another person.
  • The answer with updated information was provided a few days before the edit.

With those things, I'm not sure I see malice or a blatant attempt to plagiarize anything here; my gut tells me that the editor wanted the most prominent and accepted answer to simply be "correct" and have the most up-to-date information. However, in them doing so, they've made the new answer come across as stealing the existing one at best.

With that in mind...I'm thinking it'd be fine to do these things:

  • Roll back the edit
  • Leave a note to the OP letting them know that the state of things has changed
  • Hope for the best

There's nothing anyone can do to change the accepted answer of a question, but the community may vote on it. Accepted answers only really mean anything to the OP.


For some additional under-the-hood context, Kato actually works for the Firebase team at Google, according to both their profile and the email thread they linked to, so they would definitely qualify as an authority on the matter and any new edits from them would be acceptable.

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  • Yes, i completely agree with that it is not an attempt at plagiarism I just felt it was the wrong way to go about bringing the new information to light, since it already existed as an answer. A comment would have felt more appropriate. Or an addition to the answer, referring to the other answer for updated info. I have upvoted the other answer based on it providing the correct info. As like you say, upvotes can be more prominent. – IAmGroot Nov 3 '16 at 15:43
  • @Makato: I left a comment explaining my reasoning. I also redid my edit to show as a "hideous update block". :-) – Frank van Puffelen Nov 3 '16 at 16:08

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