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I've noticed that the documentation jumps around in it's programming style. It bugs me.

This mainly applies to C-like languages with relaxed syntax, but can apply to any programming.

DANGER: OPINIONS AHEAD

I think we should use the K&R style simply because it's just about the only one we could agree on:

int foo(int condition)
{
    if(condition) {
        do_something();
    } else {
        some_other_thing();
        //brackets around single-line blocks like this one are optional.
    }

Edit: @Trilarion is right. Mods: Close?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Frédéric Hamidi, Glorfindel, ArK, user6263819, Toto Oct 26 '16 at 9:22

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    "I think we should use the K&R style simply because it's just about the only one we could agree on:" The reason some people don't use K&R style is because they don't like it. And therefore they wouldn't agree with using it here. So I don't see how you could expect everyone to agree with it. – Nicol Bolas Oct 26 '16 at 3:27
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    I've noticed that the documentation jumps around in it's programming style. It bugs me. - so? The style is independent to everyone, it also shows that documentation is made up many people who happen to have different style... it doesn't prevent anyone from understanding a certain topic – Li357 Oct 26 '16 at 4:35
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    I understand programming style as a way to programm. You probably just mean a formatting style. As for formatting styles, is there a standard? Everything that is possible could be a standard. – Trilarion Oct 26 '16 at 7:41
  • @AndrewLi That is not true. It surely makes understanding several topics harder if they are using different layout conventions. Why do you think books have the same style everywhere. With the same argument I coould change the font type for every second word. – Trilarion Oct 26 '16 at 7:42
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    A standard style would prevent rep-farming by cosmetic style changes. It's just that <insert criticism of your favorite formatting style here>. – S.L. Barth Oct 26 '16 at 7:54
  • I just recently read in a book that every good programmer should have no issue with reading code in a different formatting style. As long as it is consistent in itself I don't see how people should have an issue with different styles. In the internet you stumble across so many different styles. You get used to it at some point. – Hayt Oct 26 '16 at 9:57
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    Primarily... opinion based? We're on meta people, this question is asking "Should we adopt a consistent style for Docs?" which I personally disagree with, but that's for downvoting, not closing. – hichris123 Oct 26 '16 at 11:37
1

Not sure, there is a standard layout style for C code. There is valid style and invalid style but standard style?

The advantage of a common convention would be that readers have it a bit easier digesting the topics because they do not need to adopt to different styles.

The disadvantage would be that Documentation creators may need to put more effort into the creation and that whatever style the convention should be, some may not like it.

We have to balance the advantage and the disadvantage and currently I would say that enforcing a rule is not helpful. Adopting to different formatting styles is not too difficult but requiring everyone to use the same style, possibly editing lots of posts which may be a lot of work.

So I think we should use whatever style we want as long as it is sufficiently readable.

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