3

It was very discouraging for my second edit to be rejected for such a hard-to-prove reason as "not preserving original intent" -- I mean I guess technically the answer's original intent could have been "trying to subtly mislead OP to advance a plot for world domination" I can't really tell -- when it demonstrably improves the value of the answer.

From this related question (Clarification regarding editing answers of other users) it appears that:

"There's nothing wrong with fixing a minor bug / edge-case in an answer, especially when the problem has already been discussed in the comments"

which is the exact type of improvement this edit made: "fixing a minor bug / edge-case"

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/13848130

Using my best judgement, I determined the original intent of the answer to be two-fold:

  1. Show the set of inputs that lead to IndexErrors
  2. Show the user how to avoid such errors.

However, the answer was imprecise in delivering on intent 1.

The following inputs

title_case("foo  bar")
title_case("foo bar ")
title_case("foo  bar", "foo")
title_case("foo bar ", "foo")

all throw IndexErrors (as unedited answer would indicate), however

title_case("foo  bar", "")
title_case("foo bar ", "")

do NOT throw IndexErrors, although according to the unedited answer, these inputs should cause IndexErrors as well.

I believed that my edit (which only clarified that IndexErrors only occur when minor_words != "") preserved the intent of the answer, and improved the quality/correctness of the answer in a meaningful way.

Is there any rigorous, well-defined approach I can utilize to ensure my edit won't be rejected for "not preserving original intent", or is it always just a flip of the coin whether reviewers feel a demonstrably valuable edit goes against "original intent"?

  • 1
    Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/313761/… – Shog9 Oct 2 '16 at 17:01
  • So from the accepted answer to that question: "There's nothing wrong with fixing a minor bug / edge-case in an answer, especially when the problem has already been discussed in the comments." Also from accepted answer: "That said, some folks are extremely paranoid about this." So I have to hope reviewers aren't paranoid? – stevenjackson121 Oct 2 '16 at 17:03
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    Assume that they will be, steven - and do your best to put them at ease with your edit and comment. – Shog9 Oct 2 '16 at 18:47
4

If you change the meaning of someone's answer, you changed the original intent. Answer edits should be used for things like fixing typos, spelling, grammar, etc. Use a comment if you think the answer needs a correction or clarification.

  • Could you cite that answer? There are a LOT of questions on this site related to "Not Preserving Original Intent", and I did try to sift through them, but I did not see that definition anywhere. As a new editor, I would expect to see "Not Meaningfully Equivalent to Original Answer" for changes which DO preserve intent, but change the functional meaning. – stevenjackson121 Oct 2 '16 at 16:57
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    Especially since this conflicts directly with the highest voted (and accepted) answer to the related question referenced by @Shog9 meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/313761/… and corresponds almost precisely with the most-downvoted answer to that question. – stevenjackson121 Oct 2 '16 at 17:05
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    @stevenjackson121 Shog's answer doesn't say that it's OK to change the meaning of an answer. It says it's OK to fix a minor bug or edge case if that change has already been discussed in the comments. It also goes on to say that (basically) if in doubt don't edit. – ChrisF Oct 2 '16 at 17:24
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    "There's nothing wrong with fixing a minor bug / edge-case in an answer, especially when the problem has already been discussed in the comments." Emphasis on the word you selectively left out. English is my first language, but I'm not an English major, so perhaps you could clarify. In this context, does "especially" mean "only"? I thought "especially" carried meaning akin to logical "if" (sufficient but not necessary condition). But you are suggesting its meaning is closer to logical "iff" (both sufficient and necessary)? – stevenjackson121 Oct 2 '16 at 17:33
  • Also, I don't mean to repeat myself, but if you could cite your answer, it might have a chance at being accepted. I (clearly) don't like it, but if it's the definition used by this community, I will learn to live with it. Even if it directly contradicts the related answer I'm using as supporting evidence, if it has more upvotes (community support) behind it, I will accept your answer. – stevenjackson121 Oct 2 '16 at 17:40
  • @ChrisF Shog goes the extra mile to not even mention "meaning", because that's an slippery slope, how can you change "meaning" if the author doesn't make it clear what they meant in first place? – Braiam Oct 2 '16 at 18:36
0

What to do if you find yourself in a similar situation:

Do try more extensive documentation in the revision comments in the future, to ease the burden on the reviewer and also to improve the likelihood that the edit gets accepted. Consider adding a comment on the original answer explaining the problem, but weigh whether the comment will still provide utility after the edit is accepted.

Don't stop making these types of edits, as other answers might suggest.

In Summary:

  1. Nothing wrong with these types of edits.
  2. These types of edits are preferred over adding a new answer, which adds overhead to every subsequent reader
  3. These types of edits are often rejected by folks who are "extemely paranoid", so documenting the change really well is a good idea to get it accepted.
  4. Almost certainly ok if the problem has already been discussed in the comments
  5. If the problem has not already been discussed in the comments, over-documenting the edit in the revision comments is preferred. Possibly also adding a comment to the original thread, although that adds overhead to every subsequent reader as well.

Thorough Answer Based on Similar Question

Clarification regarding editing answers of other users

Because of some very selective citations in the current discussion (which do not preserve the intent of the original answer... oh the irony), I'm copying the entire most upvoted answer from the related question, and will analyze it in the context of this question.

There's nothing wrong with fixing a minor bug / edge-case in an answer, especially when the problem has already been discussed in the comments.

The first paragraph makes it explicit that edits which change the meaning of the answer are ok to fix a minor bug / edge-case in the answer.

The word "especially" highlights the case where the problem has already been discussed in the comments, but does not suggest that it is a requirement that the problem must have already been discussed in the comments.

That said, some folks are extremely paranoid about this. I find it's usually worth erring on the side of caution and over-documenting your change in the revision comments and possibly even the comments on the post itself. You did the latter, but a revision comment explaining your change (instead of the default " added n characters in body") wouldn't have hurt.

The second paragraph helps solve my problem, although it does not answer the question "How is original intent determined":

Over-document the change in two places so that folks who are "extremely paranoid" can see that your edit which changes the meaning of the answer does not change the original intent. It does not say that you err on the side of caution regarding what to edit.

If there's a technical problem with the change, that's different... But so far as I can tell, the change you made was respectful and preserved the intent of the author. If anything, the fact that the author is still active on the site makes this less of a problem - the system has automatically notified him of the change, and if he dislikes it then he's free to roll it back.

This is more targeted at the other users exact situation, and is not directly relevant to my case.

As Stack Overflow grows and ages, the chance that individual authors will be able to maintain their past work becomes increasingly slim. In some cases, it suffices to post a new answer, but for trivial corrections this imposes an awful lot of overhead on every subsequent reader. The ability for editors to make corrections and for those corrections to be vetted by the community is an essential part of the site and must be preserved.

Emphasis added. Editing is encouraged over posting a new answer in certain circumstances, due to the reduced burden it places on new readers of the question.

Making comments prior to editing which become obsolete as soon as the edit is made, for the sole purpose of justifying the edit clearly causes extra overhead for every subsequent reading, and I would argue that this should dictate proper procedure when the problem has not already been discussed in the comments:

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