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I've asked a question about ASP.NET MVC 5 error pages two years ago. Although I've accepted an answer some time ago, and it was certainly a valid answer in the past, I do no longer think it is the best answer considering today's technology & possibilities.

Is it "good style on SO" to change the accepted answer? I want to give people a hint, that the best answer might have changed. Or is it customary to keep the initially accepted answer locked-in and let the votes speak for themselves?

  • What's the best answer is completely on your behalf as the asker. Do as you like. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 26 '16 at 20:07
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    You can accept any answer you want. You can even unaccept and not accept anything else. – ryanyuyu Sep 26 '16 at 20:07
  • Are there better answers for the version of .NET the question is about, or are there better answers when a newer version of .NET is used? – Gimby Sep 26 '16 at 20:12
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There is nothing inherently wrong with changing the accepted answer.

In this specific case, why would you? The accepted answer is pretty good for that question, and the others aren't very viable without following links.

One angle you could take here, would be to bounty the question and attempt to get a more recent solution to the server error response. That may land some new answers.

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Is it "good style on SO" to change the accepted answer?

As moderator deceze points out in an answer to a similar question, It's entirely the prerogative of the OP to accept any answer they deem most suitable. Since this sounds like a request for moral advice, the best answer is to say that it's highly subjective.

Some people may get hurt from having their accepted answer retracted (example, to which the answer was: Move on and answer some other questions.). If you don't like to risk imposing such feelings, you could check to see if the user has many points, or hasn't been recently active. Many old questions are asked and answered by users no longer active (example; answerer to accepted answer not logged in for 9 years).

You could also place an "Edit: The accepted answer was changed for reason xyz." below your question to address any potential reactions.

Or you can be bold and stick to your intent:

  • I do no longer think it is the best answer considering today's technology & possibilities.
  • I want to give people a hint, that the best answer might have changed.

These reasons are altruistic and serve a greater use to all future visitors of the Q&A.

is it customary to keep the initially accepted answer locked-in and let the votes speak for themselves?

You may let votes (and comments) speak for themselves, or you may let them influence you as a moderator towards a consensus. The drawback of keeping an outdated answer as accepted is that people are biased towards upvoting answers at the top of the list.

It may happen that the best answer is buried because it was given recently. In that case, you risk that future visitors will not read their way to the question or risk wasting their time going through solutions that don't really work or aren't recommended any more.

An example of that (and the reason I've written this answer) is the question How can I safely use regexes from user input? from Jan 2010 with an accepted answer from the same day and a few competing answers. One of them happens to be from May 2015. I like this answer better because it doesn't just outline why this is a problem with a practical counter-example, like the accepted answer does, or with a theoretical argument and reference to documentation, like the most upvoted answer, but actually how to safely use regexes from user input.

The best answer may simply change over time.

We should reward people for keeping a popular resource attractive.

Otherwise, the Q&A becomes a boneyard in the way of an oasis.

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    "You could also place an "Edit: The accepted answer was changed for reason xyz." to address any potential reactions." That is at best a comment, it is quite an unacceptable edit to make. – Gimby Mar 13 '18 at 10:35
  • I intended for that to mean below your question (as I've updated the text to say now). I don't think it is unacceptable to edit your own question. But yes, it is unacceptable to edit answers that aren't your own and say such things, because it violates the space of the answerer. – Simon Shine Mar 13 '18 at 10:50
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    It is absolutely acceptable to edit your own question, it is unacceptable to edit in fluff and/or chatty meta data. It is also absolutely acceptable to edit answers which are not your own. If it weren't acceptable, you wouldn't be able to do so. But you don't go adding things which have nothing to do with the question/answer. – Gimby Mar 13 '18 at 10:54

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