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What kind of flag should be raised when we see a questions such as: How to randomly select an enum in Swift (no code questions - asking for us to write code).

I generally leave a comment telling them that SO is not a code writing service, and that we need to see so far. Is there a set flag that should be raised, should we leave a comment, or should we add a flag for questions without code?

marked as duplicate by tripleee, πάντα ῥεῖ, Tiny Giant, Luke, HaveNoDisplayName Sep 20 '16 at 5:54

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    It's already available in the off-topic close reasons. If the question isn't about existing code, it's most likely too broad. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 20 '16 at 4:01
  • @πάνταῥεῖ I have occasionally flagged it as too broad. – techydesigner Sep 20 '16 at 4:01
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    As mentioned that's most probably the correct reason for these cases. – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 20 '16 at 4:02
  • @πάνταῥεῖ Could we have it as an official answer please? – techydesigner Sep 20 '16 at 4:03
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What kind of flag should be raised when we see a questions such as: How to randomly select a String in Swift (no code questions - asking for us to write code).

You are making a (false) assumption that questions asking how to do something without including an attempt to solve the problem are inherently off-topic.

You are wrong.

The only questions that explicitly require code are debugging questions. Those questions require an MCVE (Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example) in order to be on-topic.

How-to questions do not require code. Including a failed attempt in a how-to question turns the how-to question into a debugging question. Contrary to popular belief, Stack Overflow is not solely a code debugging service.

How-to questions can be too broad, unclear, primarily opinion based, or off-topic for other reasons, but they are not off-topic just because they don't include a failed attempt to solve the problem.

Some of the most useful questions on this site are short how-to questions that do not include an attempt to solve the problem.

I generally leave a comment telling them that SO is not a code writing service, and that we need to see so far.

This is also incorrect. Contrary to popular belief Stack Overflow is a code writing service. We write code for people, all day long, all night long, and everything in between, on-top, beside, and underneath. We write code, that's what we do. If we aren't a code writing service, what are we?

Is there a set flag that should be raised, should we leave a comment, or should we add a flag for questions without code?

No, there is no "One Flag To Rule Them All". If an existing close reason applies to a question, use it... after you do everything else you can do to improve the question.

Yes, you should leave a comment if you want to ask for clarification or more information, or to inform the user of how you believe that they can improve their question.

No, we should not add a flag for questions without code, that is nonsense.

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    "Including a failed attempt in a how-to question turns the how-to question into a debugging question." Not really. Debugging questions want help making the preselected approach work, while "how do I" questions are looking for approaches different from the ones tried. Just because both ask for help turning failure into success does not make them equivalent. In fact, if a failed attempt on a how-to question is properly investigated before posting, it usually isn't expressed as complete code, but as "fopen-then-fread-then-sscanf doesn't work when a block boundary breaks a field" – Ben Voigt Sep 20 '16 at 6:01
  • so asking for users to write a program is an acceptable post for SO? – CodingNinja Apr 30 '17 at 8:28
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    @theProgrammer101 in a nutshell. if the topic is too broad, unclear, etc then it is off-topic for that reason; but questions arent off-topic solely because they ask how to do something with the intention of receiving a code example demonstrating the answer. – Tiny Giant Apr 30 '17 at 14:10
  • @TinyGiant but if you give them the answers for their homework, isn't it plagiarism? – CodingNinja May 2 '17 at 6:35
  • @theProgrammer101 Giving them the answer is not plagiarism (unless you are copying it from somewhere without attribution). If they were to submit the answer as their own work, that would be plagiarism; but there is nothing that we can do about that. Anyone can plagiarize anything. – Tiny Giant May 2 '17 at 14:47
  • @tinyGiant Thank you, that clears it up. – CodingNinja May 2 '17 at 22:24

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