815

Can one ask questions about homework, and if so, how? What guidelines should members use when responding to homework questions?


Return to FAQ index

Markdown link:
[How do I ask and answer homework questions?](https://meta.stackoverflow.com/q/334822)

1
953

The community has mixed feelings about homework questions. While some feel that students should be able to get an answer to any question they want to ask, others feel that Stack Overflow is not a place for homework questions at all.

This is an attempt to reconcile these two extreme positions in a way that is acceptable to the majority of the community. Note that this post is not the official position of the Stack Overflow administrators, but rather a community-edited effort to provide clear guidelines on how to respond to homework. Individual community members should, of course, use their own judgment.

The guidelines outlined below are rooted in two principles:

  • It is okay to ask about homework. For one, it would be impossible to stop it all even if we wanted to. Stack Overflow exists to help programmers learn and provide a standard repository for programming problems, both simple and complex, and this includes helping students.

  • Providing an answer that doesn't help a student learn is not in the student's own best interest. Therefore you might choose to treat homework questions differently than other questions.

Asking about homework

  • Search for already existing questions about your issue. Try using both the Stack Overflow site search and your favorite search engine. Most search engines allow you to limit results to a single site. For example, you can search Stack Overflow on Google. Definitely try searching for your title and/or the key words in your title along with the language tag for the language your question is working with. Look through at least the first several results. People tend to respond negatively if they can easily find a duplicate to your question, particularly if they can do so by just searching for your question's title..

  • Make a good faith attempt to solve the problem yourself first. Users here respond negatively if your question gives them the impression that you're asking them to do your work for you. On the other hand, questions which ask about a specific issue which you're having a problem with usually receive a much better response.

  • Ask about specific problems with your existing implementation. If you can't do that yet, try some more of your own work first or searching for more general help; your professor is likely to be a better resource at this stage than Stack Overflow.

  • Be aware of school policy. If your school has a policy regarding outside help on homework, make sure you are aware of it before you ask for/receive help on Stack Overflow. If there are specific restrictions (for example, you can receive help, but not full code samples), include them in the question so that those providing assistance can keep you out of trouble. Note that vandalism and/or edits to questions that invalidate existing answers are against policy. Attempts to hide your question after you've received an answer will not be successful and will make it harder for you to get answers to future questions. See also: I've rethought my question about a homework assignment—why can't I get it deleted?

  • Never use code you don't understand. It definitely won't help you later (after school, in later assignments, on tests, etc.) and it could be, at best, very embarrassing if you are asked to explain code you turned in.

  • Understand the difference between "asking a question about your homework" and "asking a specific question about the code in your homework". You should never ask a question about your homework because more often than not it will not meet the recommendations in the rest of these guidelines. Instead, ask the question about the code you wrote to solve your homework problem, and be specific with the inputs, desired outputs, and error messages. It is ideal if you take your code and create a minimal, reproducible example instead of pasting your entire code, especially if it is a long code block.

Answering and moderating homework questions

  • Try to provide explanation that will lead the asker in the correct direction. Genuine understanding is the real goal for students, but trying to provide that is usually appreciated for any question.

  • It's usually better not to provide a complete code sample if you believe it would not help the student, using your best judgment. You can use pseudo-code first, and, in the spirit of creating a programming resource, you may come back after a suitable amount of time and edit your response to include more complete code. This way, the student still has to write their own code, but a full solution can become available after the assignment has ended.

  • Recognize that homework is likely to include artificial constraints, and honor those constraints. Also be aware that these constraints may affect whether or not a question should be closed as a duplicate.

  • Don't downvote others who answer homework questions in good faith, even if they break these guidelines (unless the answer would merit downvotes even if the question weren't homework related). It's not always obvious at first glance that a question is homework, especially when you're not expecting to see it here. It is a good idea to suggest editing the response in a comment.

  • Don't ridicule a student because they haven't yet learned something obvious or developed the good habits you'd expect from a seasoned programmer. Do add a respectful comment or answer that points them towards best practices and better style.

  • Don't downvote a homework question that follows the guidelines and was asked in good faith.

  • It's okay to ask if a question is homework, but be polite.

4
  • 7
    I agree, but often a question on homework is just the homework, only a quote of the assignment. If people wrote real questions about how to solve the problem, maybe we would help with more homework problems. These people make all homework problems look bad in the eyes of the community. – CATboardBETA Feb 9 at 14:20
  • 5
    If everyone fallowed the "Make a good faith attempt to solve the problem yourself first" rule, we wouldn't need to delete half as many posts. – Anonymous Mar 14 at 2:42
  • 1
    This is a really good answer and for good reason this is linked in the FAQ on how to ask questions. Unfortunately, it is not aligned with how questions are being moderated and I think it would be more honest to say that beginners are not welcome to ask questions on SO and members are not welcome to help beginners. Then create a "SO Learners" site for beginners and professionals who want to help beginners. I am in the last category and I clearly feel this effort is unwelcome at SO. – nielsen Mar 28 at 1:18
  • 1
    @nielsen I completely agree. I frequently see what I can only describe as bad, vague, perhaps even lazy, questions, and I often still want to help. A more beginner-friendly, general-assistance-centric sister-site would be an excellent idea, IMO. – Ashley Miller Mar 28 at 5:40

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .