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I was browsing the C# topic on generics and noticed that there wasn't a good canonical example for how to marry behavior that knows the type arguments with scenarios in which you do not know the type arguments but can still in principle interact with that type in a non-generic way. (perhaps I missed it?)

Regardless, the point of this question is to address the scenario in which a potential documentation-contributor can't offer even an attempt at an example without being confronted with the message, "This topic has the maximum number of examples". I completely understand why this check exists (drowning in examples), but it seems a bit coarse, and, moreover, really kind of puts the kibosh on a contributor's desire to participate.

Confronted with the sentence, "Consider removing superfluous examples or splitting out a portion of the examples here into a new topic." I feel like one is left bereft of any seriously actionable way to provide the content that was volunteered.

I don't know what the solution is, but it seems to me that there needs to be a more effective apparatus such that contributors can still feed their input into the system (too many examples -- perhaps at least allow the example to go into a queue) without forcing the potential contributor with no recourse save saving the contribution for later and engaging in an exercise of community persuasion.

I suspect it's common that effective contributors are not also effective persuaders. I think the status quo prevents too much signal from being processed.

closed as off-topic by pnuts, Stephen Rauch, HaveNoDisplayName, Michael Gaskill, Code Lღver Sep 12 '18 at 5:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, Stephen Rauch, HaveNoDisplayName, Michael Gaskill, Code Lღver
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Officially, you're expected to fix topic organization before adding more content. See meta.stackoverflow.com/a/332350 In my opinion, it's a dirty hack which doesn't motivate good improvements, especially after reputation system update. So, my bad advice of the day: edit a random existing example and add the content you want. There's a (high) chance it'll be approved (hello, roboreviewers) and a (miniscule) chance somebody will fix the topic later. If you don't want to organize the topic yourself, I don't see any better options really. :( – Athari Sep 18 '16 at 1:02
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    If you want to improve Documentation you'll have to do the full work and reorganize the topic before or just do nothing at all. They don't want you to do only the nice part (creating the examples). Unfortunately there is not much rep to be gained by deleting, moving, editing, ... Best may be here to put your example on your own website until Documentation get's better... or do the full work and reorganize everything. – Trilarion Sep 19 '16 at 17:32
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    Yea...the problem is that documentation isn't a list, it's a tree, and it's fractal. Stack Overflow's attempt at documentation hasn't been able to adequately address this structural issue, which leads to questions like this, where the advice is inevitably "split it into more topics". – zzzzBov Sep 19 '16 at 17:33