2

Looking at Documentation right now, I think it's failling to accomplish one of its main prupouses: give the community the power to document for themselves technologies (or libraries, frameworks, etc.) that, for example, have that kind of technical documentation:

A hidden link in a badly designed page takes you to a PDF file, you scroll down to the 500th page, close the file and tell your client "I'm sorry, but this is cannot be done, it is technically impossible because of [insert a lot of lies the client doesn't understand here]".

Have in mind that badly documented technologies usually don't get much attention from developers, and are only used by the few people who actually read all that documentation and got something out of it, or paid for an excessively over-priced training.


Why are people not documenting these types of technologies (personal opinion):

  1. Doc tags are created from QA tags, this excludes a lot of the badly documented stuff right away
  2. On top of 1, you even need 500 questions asked on the tag, which excludes the possibility to create the QA tag and then the Doc tag
  3. On top of 1 and 2, you need 5 users with at least one positively scored answer to commit to the tag. This is not the right way to do it, take advantage of bandwagon behaviour, people are going to commit to document on a specific technology once they see others already started doing so.
  4. Badly documented technologies belong to a "part of the software industry" where understanding the technology is a competitive advantage, and those who have it will not give it away for free
  5. On top of 4, most of that "part of the software industry" comes to SO to get solutions, not to provide them

1, 2 and 3 can be addressed by re-thinking the system for creating new tags on Doc.

4 and 5 cannot be addressed, but at least we would be giving the tools for anyone in that "part of the software industry" to make the difference.

I'm not sure how a new system to create tags would work, but I'm sure Doc is having less active users every day and most of its content is already very well documented on other sites.

closed as off-topic by pnuts, jhpratt, Nissa, peterh, Robert Columbia Nov 8 '18 at 2:03

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, jhpratt, Nissa, peterh, Robert Columbia
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    "this excludes a lot of the badly documented stuff right away" yet, it seems to not exclude the generation of badly regurgitated bad documentation anyways. I prefer having one less problem to deal with. BTW, the restriction is meant to prevent the creation of ghost towns.... while creating ghost towns since the ones that have the more to share, simply gave up. – Braiam Sep 8 '16 at 15:15
  • @Braiam I agree reputation in doc can be earned withouth any valuable contributions, and I also agree people who want to make good documentation get frustrated because of the "rep whores", but that has nothing to do with this question. I believe the fact that you are helping others can be much more powerfull than an artificial measurement of belonging (reputation). – Marco Scabbiolo Sep 8 '16 at 15:31
  • 3
    Part of the current restrictions on creating documentation areas based on qualified tags are temporary while documentation is in Beta. It's very likely that some of those restrictions loosen or change completely once it's out of Beta. – Kurtis Beavers Sep 8 '16 at 16:52
2

The purpose of these rules is to ensure that there are sufficient numbers of motivated users who regularly come to SO. These are the only users who can be relied upon to both regularly contribute to such documentation and curate it.

While drive-by users are not unwelcome, what will keep a documentation tag going are the frequent users. And they, more often than not, will be regular SO users. As such:

Doc tags are created from QA tags, this excludes a lot of the badly documented stuff right away

Stuff that would not get documented because there's nobody here to do it.

Also, this is Stack Overflow. If there's not even a single question on that subject here, then it's too unused of a technology to be even worth documenting. We have a tag for Logo.

On top of 1, you even need 500 questions asked on the tag, which excludes the possibility to create the QA tag and then the Doc tag

There are two types of things that haven't reached the 500 questions asked level. One are things like the above, where the number of users is vanishingly small. So that falls under the above category of "nobody here to document it."

The other are for new technologies. There might be some case to be made that there are users of that new technology on SO who might be willing to produce documentation.

But you cannot prove that. A tag that has some minimum number of questions has proven that there is a group of people on SO that might be willing to document it.

On top of 1 and 2, you need 5 users with at least one positively scored answer to commit to the tag. This is not the right way to do it, take advantage of bandwagon behaviour, people are going to commit to document on a specific technology once they see others already started doing so.

If the only way to get people to commit to something is to see other people committed to it, then nobody would ever start anything.

If a user can't commit themselves to building documentation from scratch, then Docs.SO cannot work. As an example, take OpenGL documentation tag.

has over 26,000 questions. It has a cadre of top users who help get answers to questions and/or close them when appropriate. By all rights, this should be an ideal documentation topic.

The OpenGL documentation tag contains all of five topics. Two of them are comprised solely of garbage examples that have been downvoted. It hasn't had any activity since mid-August.

If a tag with 26,000 questions can fail as spectacularly as this one has, what does that tell you about the importance of finding people who are committed to something? If you cannot find a core of people who are going to be willing to take responsibility for getting things done, then that documentation tag won't fly.

  • Take the avaya dmcc library for example, the core tool to integrate with the most important and widely used telephony services provider in the world, it has 1 question on SO, and it's a perfect example of a badly documented technology, and with the current tag creation system, it is impossible to document it. The people properly trained to use that library demand you to pay thousands of dollars for bad software, because they have partnerships with avaya. If the tag gets created and some people start working on it, we might change this for good. There are more examples like this one, trust me. – Marco Scabbiolo Sep 9 '16 at 2:39
  • 1
    @MarcoScabbiolo: "If the tag gets created and some people start working on it, we might change this for good." And if the tag gets created and nobody does anything, then it will change nothing. The lack of questions on SO shows plenty of evidence that there is no expertise on this subject here on Stack Overflow. So there is every reason to believe that it will go undocumented. Or worse, be like the OpenGL docs tag. The purpose of culling that out is to prevent the creation of empty docs tags that would only be filled in by random luck. – Nicol Bolas Sep 9 '16 at 2:43
  • I would document it, because I work on the call center industry and I don't want other to have to go through what I had to. I know colleges who would gladly help, and they don't actually have a SO user. The current tag creation system and your arguments exclude potentially great contributors who don't actually use SO, but would if the opportunity to change things for good was given to them. All I'm proposing is to make Doc more new-user friendly, by attracting people with expertise on incredibly useful and badly documented technologies who don't use SO. – Marco Scabbiolo Sep 9 '16 at 2:49
  • All you need is one single person to start with the right foot. Others will see that, and eventually some will join them. I'm talking about great contributors, who don't care about reputation that could open doors to everyone that have been closed for too long. I think that's a pretty big deal for Doc, and the system is not preventing empty and forgotten tags right now... Just go through some pages and you'll see. The current system is not working, and it's so bad it's actually excluding good documentation that's not available anywhere. – Marco Scabbiolo Sep 9 '16 at 2:59
  • @MarcoScabbiolo: "the system is not preventing empty and forgotten tags right now" But the system you're talking about will simply create more "empty and forgotten tags". While this one is far from 100%, it's at least stopping lots of them. – Nicol Bolas Sep 9 '16 at 3:08
  • I haven't proposed a specific system, but you're right, maybe it'll backfire even harder than the current one. I would do it anyway, the opportunity to make this technologies available for everyone is worh it, at least that's what I think. One way to start would be to implement exactly the same system Q&A has, and have an automatic tag-cleanup for the ones that failed to get going. That would be way better than what we actually have, what do you think? – Marco Scabbiolo Sep 9 '16 at 3:14
  • 4
    @MarcoScabbiolo: "All you need is one single person to start with the right foot." As the person who almost single-handedly turned the OpenGL Wiki from a wasteland of FAQ-style drek into a legitimate catalog of information, I have to say that this has not been my experience. Merely building some good documentation will not by itself attract others. And if these people were out there, champing at the bit to make good docs, they would have made them already. Cheap website space isn't hard to find. – Nicol Bolas Sep 9 '16 at 3:16
  • 2
    @MarcoScabbiolo: "That would be way better than what we actually have, what do you think?" I thought my post made that clear. No, it will not make things better. It'll solve your problem, while creating lots more work for other people. Searching for empty/useless Docs.SO tags and cleaning them up is not a task we should hand off to other people. – Nicol Bolas Sep 9 '16 at 3:17
  • Looks you really have experience on this, maybe I'm being too naive. Thanks for the discussion! – Marco Scabbiolo Sep 9 '16 at 3:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .