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There are many places where cryptographic code is provided as an answer to a cryptographic question. There is of course little wrong with providing code to answer a question. We often understand the answer better if code is provided; we're software developers after all.

The problem with cryptographic code is that it is often used as source for copy/paste programming. Many code samples however deviate far from the given question and introduce additional features. Some even don't answer the question at all and just provide a random sample. And - predictably - almost all of these code snippets introduce huge security issues and bad cryptographic practices.

And although we cannot reliably keep people from shooting themselves in the foot, we should make sure that it is hard to shoot themselves in the foot. We can together do this by doing the following, in my opinion:

  • comment below the question regarding security issues encountered in the question - that way they are less likely to be addressed in the answers;
  • upvote answers that answer the particular question, even if they do not give additional security related advice;
  • edit or comment answers that do answer the question but introduce new features (and upvote once those have been fixed);
  • downvote, comment and flag answers that do not actually answer the question.

Note that cryptography is a bit special in the sense that it may be programmed perfectly, supplies the right answer 100% of the time and be utterly insecure.


Related is the following discussion about security advice. This is however more about sample code.

And, to show what happens if we don't act on this, the following question. Note that there is nothing wrong with the question (apart from possible dupes, but that's beside the point). I was asked by one of the answerers to add my own sample code, but that was not what was actually asked. Besides, can you spot the perfectly correct answer with the low score?


So, what do you think about above solutions? Are they OK? Are there better options of getting rid of these code snippets? Or should we let people simply shoot themselves?

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    The flagging part as NAA is most likely to fail because the answers will seem legit to any reviewer, even moderators. See: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/225370/… – rene Sep 6 '16 at 21:24
  • @rene Hopefully not in the question of the link shown, as none of them actually answer the question about what is wrong in the code. They just provide entirely different code samples. But it may well be that I'm too optimistic about that. I have flagged them, so let's see what happens – Maarten Bodewes Sep 6 '16 at 21:27
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    Also in the question of the link shown. In the SOCVR room we have had enough declined NAA flags that I can speak from experience, not only from hearsay – rene Sep 6 '16 at 21:29
  • ... and I don't mind being downvoted of course, especially on meta, but please indicate why. – Maarten Bodewes Sep 6 '16 at 21:39
  • I don't think we need a policy on this. People should be free to shoot themselves in the foot. If security is not high on a company's priority list, it will be when their feet start going missing. That said, all of your suggestions are fine, except I don't think that editing code in others' answers is necessarily a good thing in general, and flagging isn't appropriate if the answer is not otherwise flaggable. You might create a feature request to add a "this code is insecure" flag/close reason, but the appetite for changing those is little to none... – Heretic Monkey Sep 6 '16 at 22:48
  • @MikeMcCaughan The percentage of cryptographic questions being closed is already next to zero. A close reason doesn't work because closing in itself doesn't work for cryptography related questions :( Besides, close reasons are for questions, not answers. So closing is out... – Maarten Bodewes Sep 6 '16 at 22:52
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    Cryptography and encryption aren't special. There's plenty of insecure code on the web for all kinds of applications. Disallowing code samples just robs people of an opportunity to learn from other people's mistakes, forcing them to make their own. – Bill the Lizard Sep 7 '16 at 23:57
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    @BilltheLizard Currently the code samples are learning people how to make mistakes, rather than the other way around. 97 upvotes on a crypographically insecure asnwer. I see the same thing on other sites, with the Android code snippets blunder being the highest one. Code samples are OK, I said so right in the post, but they should be confined to the problem at hand in my opinion. – Maarten Bodewes Sep 8 '16 at 12:06
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This is a troublesome issue. It goes way beyond mere security: it shows that votes don't indicate post quality.

In this particular case, the votes on said answers most definitely aren't votes from security experts who though "Wow, this answer explains encryption very well and shows a reusable code sample".

You can bet your ass the upvotes mean "I was looking for a copy-pasteable encryption snippet, and after running this code, I couldn't read the output as plaintext, so it must be secure! Thanks!".

An answer presenting copy-pasteable code and introducing a security vulnerability or bad practice without explicitly mentioning that at the beginning should be downvoted into oblivion.

Yes, it shows "how not to do things", but then doesn't mention that the presented way actually is the way not to do things. You can only know that by thoroughly examining the answer being an expert, which you probably aren't if you found it through a web search engine. So it's a bad answer.

Yes, it's the copy-paster's fault for copy-pasting without understanding the code. But face it, copy-pasting off the web is here to stay, and do we or do we not want to be a site full of exploits?

But on the other hand, a lot of answers don't cause immediate harm to your product, but add bad practices or technical debt in one way or another. The question "How to access TextBox1 on Form1 from Form2" gets answered by default with "Add a static variable, update it from the TextChanged event and read Form1.TextBox1Text from Form2".

If I had to downvote every instance of that answer, I'd have no reputation left.

So what's the solution, you ask? I'd say let more subject matter experts review posts. Let them stamp an answer as "This one is really good", or alternatively, "You should never do this" or something like that. Some kind of "seal of (dis|ap)proval". But that's a feature request I still don't dare post.

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    I'd say let more subject matter experts review posts. We could have gold-badge holders posting their comments inside the answer, not unlike the 'post notices' reserved for moderators. – Glorfindel Sep 7 '16 at 15:47
  • Seal of approval is a bad idea I think but wouldn't meta be good place to address the issue raised by the OP on my answer where you use a meta question to explain the many things that the OP find wrong about an answer(s) and where meta answers become the seal of approval from the SME's? That might end into the meta-effect being put to good use for once... – rene Sep 7 '16 at 17:20
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    I think comments serve as a seal of (dis)approval. I'd rather see an explanation why an answer is good or bad than just a stamp. – Bill the Lizard Sep 8 '16 at 0:00
  • "If I had to downvote every instance of that answer, I'd have no reputation left." Or you just do what I do: stop reading these low-quality questions and the answers they attract. Ctrl+W is free. If you want subject experts to review your posts, make them interesting and high quality. – Cody Gray Sep 8 '16 at 7:54
  • @Bill Interesting; that's how I feel, too. However, when I made a similar claim recently, I was told in no uncertain terms that is not what comments are for. – Cody Gray Sep 8 '16 at 7:59
  • @Bill of course it's not as simple as a gold thumbs up or brown thumbs down next to a question. I'm thinking more like actual reviews (as on shopping sites): "User X (who appears to know about this subject according to [tag badge/repuation/election/...]) has deemed this post worthy/not worthy, because ...". But like I said, I have been playing with the thought, but haven't fleshed it out enough to post it as an actual feature request. – CodeCaster Sep 8 '16 at 8:26
  • @Cody yes, I can close the browser, but the naive Googler who lands on that question will not know it is a bad approach demonstrated in that answer, especially if it has a couple of upvotes and the code seems to work. – CodeCaster Sep 8 '16 at 8:26
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We live in a free world and everyone is free to shoot at anything.

It can be valuable to have answers around that are wrong, especially on delicate topics that are hard to grasp for the inexperienced on the topic. The bad answers probably demonstrate the same faulty reasoning the visitor makes. Seeing answers with down votes and comments explaining where the mistake is, is helpful for the OP, the answerer and visitors. All learned a lesson.

In that sense the following options you presented are all OK:

  • comment below the question regarding security issues encountered in the question - that way they are less likely to be addressed in the answers;
  • upvote answers that answer the particular question, even if they do not give additional security related advice;
  • edit or comment answers that do answer the question but introduce new features (and upvote once those have been fixed);

The last one of your options needs a bit of work:

  • downvote, comment and flag answers that do not actually answer the question.

The flag answers is a problem and is guaranteed to lead to declined flags on your profile and the frustration that things aren't resolved. The problem with flags is that they go to reviewers (and moderators) who are trained (from who we expect) to keep anything of slightly value. As they are only presented with the answer to judge on (yes, I know they can see the question if they want but hey ...) they probably choose Looks Ok instead of Recommend Deletion. The bad answer after all IS an answer to some question. Read Your answer is in another castle: when is an answer not an answer? to get the deeper meaning of that.

So I would restate the last option as:

  • downvote and comment answers that do not actually answer the question.

Once they have a score of -1 or less cast a delete vote. If they are really crap organize delete voters, with a meta post or a message in chat rooms that are open for such requests.

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    I probably will have to agree on your note about flagging the answer, but "downvote and comment answers that do not actually answer the question" is, on its own, not going to help against "answers" like these, with 97 upvotes and 5 downvotes. And writing down all the problems with the code in the answer would be daunting and, in my opinion, just as off topic as the answer itself. – Maarten Bodewes Sep 6 '16 at 22:47

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