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I want to share and get feedback about a (simple) algorithm that is a pretty popular algorithm (recursive function) written in two programming languages (Python & C++). It's basically a comparison between these languages in terms of this basic program. But I am not sure which site exactly this question belongs to.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Blackwood, user4639281, Stephen Rauch, Cody Gray Aug 27 '17 at 5:04

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    Sounds like it should be a blog post – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Aug 30 '16 at 12:29
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    You could get each implementation reviewed (two separate questions) on Code Review, but if you want to write the review/comparison yourself that doesn't fit anywhere on the SE network. – jonrsharpe Aug 30 '16 at 12:34
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    But I am not sure which site exactly this question belongs to. - You don't even have a question... – Li357 Aug 30 '16 at 12:41
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    This isn't likely to be especially interesting. There is minimal overlap between the purposes of C++ and Python. The fact that you can write an implementation of an algorithm in either just proves that they're Turing-complete. One certainly cannot extrapolate any meaningful comparison between the languages from that. – Cody Gray Aug 30 '16 at 13:20
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    @CodyGray: "The fact that you can write an implementation of an algorithm in either just proves that they're Turing-complete." No, it doesn't even prove that. It only proves that both languages can express that particular algorithm. – Nicol Bolas Aug 30 '16 at 15:09
  • Thank you all for your comments! But I just don't understand why so many downvotes to my question. When I came here and saw this, I became like whoa! and even myself wanted to downvote my own question lol but anyways. I just really want to know and learn from my mistakes. And yeah, I just figured out that it should be a blog post rather than an SE thread as @NathanOliver said above. – Parviz Karimli Aug 30 '16 at 15:12
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    And BTW I see some great programmers/developers/software engineers here, so here is what I meant: when I tried to find the factorial of a number by a recursive function in Python I figured out that the max number that I can find the factorial of is 994; and I tried to do same in C++, where I figured out that the max number can be 170. If we try more than that like 171, it will print out inf. So I'm really curious about its reason(s). Well, I already know that there's some maximum recursion depth but I really want to know why Python can take bigger number than C++ can. – Parviz Karimli Aug 30 '16 at 15:19
  • I know it's a stupid question, but I'm really curious about that. I've been always told that C++ "beats" Python in such "competitions" lol but now, I'm just surprised! Meanwhile, I'm super eager to learn deeper :v – Parviz Karimli Aug 30 '16 at 15:22
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when I tried to find the factorial of a number by a recursive function in Python I figured out that the max number that I can find the factorial of is 994; and I tried to do same in C++, where I figured out that the max number can be 170. If we try more than that like 171, it will print out inf. So I'm really curious about its reason(s).

That is a completely different thing from what you originally stated. You said:

It's basically a comparison between these languages in terms of this basic program.

But it's not a "comparison" of any sort. You would be presenting two pieces of code and asking why the C++ code has a limit of 170. That's not about Python being "better" or C++ being "worse". It's about why the C++ code isn't able to do more than 170 iterations.

Indeed, you could probably just leave the Python part out entirely.

  • I'm sorry for the bad explanation. I was just working with this function in both of them so... but you got what I meant. And yes, my main question is that, as you said, but I also would like to know why Python doesn't take more than that. I said comparison, probably because, I thought C++ would be able to take more than that, at least, more than Python can take. – Parviz Karimli Aug 30 '16 at 15:55
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    @ParvizKarimli concrete questions have much better chance to be on-topic on SO. So if you ask each part separately it likely be on-topic (also most likely duplicate of something as there are plenty of factorial questions for every language... Also I'm surprised you've got such a high numbers to work at all - stackoverflow.com/questions/13222207/…) – Alexei Levenkov Aug 30 '16 at 22:31
  • @AlexeiLevenkov thank you for your comment! Yep, I understand. I was just kind not sure where to ask such questions like why a language doesn't take more than this value etc. I think this kind of questions are considered as low-quality in SO. And yeah, those are the numbers I got at max level. For Python implementation: pastebin.com/VzDLv809 and for C++ implementation: pastebin.com/4LDsfAB0 Again, the method I'm using is recursive function. – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 5:16
  • @ParvizKarimli if you posted question with code like you've provided for C++ I'd expect -10 as starting vote count: I suspected that your question would have nothing to do with recursion nor actually computing factorial... but was hoping for something better. Asking on meta you've avoided very low quality question (but don't try that too often :) ) – Alexei Levenkov Aug 31 '16 at 7:35
  • @AlexeiLevenkov finally, someone understood me lol but wait, what does "question would have nothing to do with recursion nor actually computing factorial" mean? – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 8:42
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    @ParvizKarimli you are expected to narrow down your problem to preferably one issue at a time - i.e. confirm that for C++ limitation is coming from your recursive call and not something else by for example trying non-recursive solution. If you did that you would see it has nothing to do with recursion... And to confirm that it has nothing to do with factorial you could just multiple by 10 each time. Additionally computing "factorial" as floating point number not going to produce what people generally call factorial. – Alexei Levenkov Aug 31 '16 at 17:02
  • @AlexeiLevenkov good spot! Thank you for your advice! But I just want to add something: I didn't actually mean that the limitation is all about recursion. However, I didn't test it in C++ actually but in Python I realized that the built-in math module factorial function can calculate even bigger numbers than by my recursive function can. And yes, that's right, I could observe it just by multiplying by 10 each time to see the limitations, but I figure out this problem while I was trying to calculate the factorials of some numbers. – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 17:34
  • @AlexeiLevenkov additionally, yes, those results of double numbers while I'm trying to calculate the factorial of are not what we would get back in high school lol but I just tried to see how far it could go. I know it might sound stupid but I just got fascinated by how this calculation goes from up to down, then down to up again! – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 17:50
  • But the maximum recursion depth stopped me to calculate more than some number when I used int type (I forgot what it exactly was), so I tried double (the biggest type I guess) and it went as far as it reached 170. Then I tried to run the same program algorithm in Python, and I realized that Python can take bigger numbers than C++ can. That moment became my second wow point after I started to playing with this silly function. – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 17:52
  • So I started to research why Python can take more than C++ can, but got nothing helpful. So I decided to dig deeper like why they have those limitations, and about maximum recursion depth etc. I decided to ask it on SO, but as you mentioned above it would be like suicide lol – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 17:52
  • @ParvizKarimli: But your question is really a simple Python question: what is it about Python's factorial implementation that allows it to go to over 800? There's no reason to mention C++. – Nicol Bolas Aug 31 '16 at 17:56
  • @NicolBolas agreed. I think it came out from my emotion lol so I wanted to figure out an answer for C++ too. Maybe I should ask them in both communities ? :)) – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 18:00
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    @ParvizKarimli: The answer for C++ is obvious: you ran out of precision. doubles only get so big, and you exceeded that. The answer for Python is non-obvious, since the implementation could be doing anything. – Nicol Bolas Aug 31 '16 at 18:02
  • @NicolBolas could you please explain the Python part in a clearer way? "the implementation could be doing anything" – Parviz Karimli Aug 31 '16 at 18:06
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    @ParvizKarimli just ask that question on SO... This comments are already way outside of scope of META. – Alexei Levenkov Aug 31 '16 at 18:08

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