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I have two questions here, but I think they're sufficiently closely related to combine them.

When reviewing suggested edits, I came across one that I thought was an "attempt to reply". I was about to reject it as such, but I noticed that there actually were various little things that could be improved about the post, so I chose "reject and edit" instead. My edits were applied immediately, and the suggested edit was correspondingly rejected, with a message from Community♦. I understand why it happened this way, because I have sufficient rep to apply edits without review, my edit superseded the suggested edit, but it made me wonder about a couple of things.

First, is it right that my edit should override the review process? I assume "Improve edit" works the same way, but with automatic approval instead of rejection. If reviews of suggested edits are supposed to be like voting, Couldn't people abuse this to cause their desired outcome of the edit review even though their vote was in the minority? Or is it just assumed that, since I can edit anyway, I should be able to do this?

Second, why can't I apply a rejection reason when I pick "reject and edit"? I would still prefer to indicate why I was rejecting. The message from Community♦:

This edit did not correct critical issues with the post - view the revision history to see what should have been changed.

is not accurate at all here. There weren't critical issues with the post. The edits I made were fairly minor. The issue was not about what the suggested edit didn't fix, it was about the fact that it was trying to add something that (in my opinion) it shouldn't have. This part of my question is very similar to this question, but I'm asking specifically for the option to select a reject reason.

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    Couldn't people abuse this to cause their desired outcome of the edit review even though their vote was in the minority Sure, but I have a feeling meta will have something to say once someone ask why was this rejected? – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Aug 17 '16 at 15:11
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    Possible duplicate of some email I sent to the SE team at some day I don't remember - their reply was that abusers are suspended swiftly so there doesn't seem to be a need to take extra measures for preventing abuse. – dorukayhan wants Monica back Aug 17 '16 at 19:53
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First, is it right that my edit should override the review process? I assume "Improve edit" works the same way, but with automatic approval instead of rejection. If reviews of suggested edits are supposed to be like voting, Couldn't people abuse this to cause their desired outcome of the edit review even though their vote was in the minority? Or is it just assumed that, since I can edit anyway, I should be able to do this?

Yes, this is correct. It would be silly to block someone with full edit rights from exercising those rights. It used to be this way, and it finally is no longer with the addition of the "Improve" and "Reject and Edit" buttons.

Second, why can't I apply a rejection reason when I pick "reject and edit"? I would still prefer to indicate why I was rejecting.

I have no idea. Probably because no one has written the code to enable this. Indeed, it does seem reasonable to be able to choose a different one of the canned rejection reasons for cases like this. Plus, it's fun to put words in the mouth of robots.


As for the more general question of "is this how it's supposed to work", I'd say yes. The general idea behind "Reject and Edit", as is obvious from the default rejection reason, is so that you can reject a suggested edit that is "too minor" or otherwise fails to fix the glaring flaws with a post, and then move immediately to actually making those changes yourself. This serves a dual purpose: first, it ensures that the post actually gets improved, and second, it allows your edit to (potentially) serve an instructional purpose for the person who originally suggested the edit (following the logic that suggested edits are "training wheels" for full editing privileges).

That said, I don't think you are abusing the feature in going outside of this narrowly conceived original purpose. It is obviously correct to dispatch an invalid suggested edit, and as already mentioned, since you have full edit privileges, it doesn't make sense to block you from editing the post as you see fit. That just hurts the site.

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    Technically, this was always possible via a very convoluted route... But it wasn't at all obvious, and the message displayed was even more confusing / even less helpful. The logic involved here is surprisingly complicated due to a few obscure rules about which rejections "count" as rejections; I'd have to say it's probably fine that the message is a bit inaccurate on occasion as long as it conveys the rough intent to reject. – Shog9 Aug 17 '16 at 16:32
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    It occurred to me that I could probably achieve the result I want by just picking "reject" and applying the appropriate reason in cases like this, and then editing the post outside the review queue. Do you think that would be appropriate, or should I still just use "reject and edit" if I'm going to edit it anyway? (Or am I worrying too much about a minor thing that no one really cares that much about?) – Don't Panic Aug 17 '16 at 17:34
  • @Don'tPanic You can, but for most edits default message seem to be reasonable. I think tiny portion of edits where custom rejection reason is required (instead of somewhat vague current one) does not deserve special case from SE development team. Assuming you've made corrections to fix the edit the editor should be able to see and reasons themselves (if they actually care). In corner case of that tiny portion editor will come to META for explanation - which can be handled on one-of basis. – Alexei Levenkov Aug 17 '16 at 21:01
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On "possible abuse": since edits are accepted under your name it is no different than going on editing rampage on your own directly. Your name will be in the history and everyone will have chance to flag your edits.

Reject and edit/Improve are essentially shortcuts to make an edit yourself from someone else's comment.

  • The possible abuse I was wondering about was not so much the edit itself, but the enforced approval or rejection of the edit suggestion despite any other approve or reject votes. e.g. If someone didn't like a particular user, they could single-handedly reject all their suggested edits. But as others have said, such a case would probably end up in meta and get sorted out pretty quickly. – Don't Panic Aug 17 '16 at 21:03
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First, is it right that my edit should override the review process? I assume "Improve edit" works the same way, but with automatic approval instead of rejection. If reviews of suggested edits are supposed to be like voting, Couldn't people abuse this to cause their desired outcome of the edit review even though their vote was in the minority? Or is it just assumed that, since I can edit anyway, I should be able to do this?

Yes, to all of that. It's really a convenience thing for the reviewers. I use it all the time, since I see things that need to be fixed.

I think there's only minimal potential for abuse. Bad reviewers, especially robo-reviewers, are likely to pick one of the fast options: approve or reject. The rep gain (or not gained) for the original editor is very small. The original editor (or anyone who sees the post), if they see anything wrong, may also @ping you or come to meta.

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